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Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Melbourne, Victoria

The Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has a membership of more than 80,000 nurses, midwives and carers employed in a range of health services including hospitals, aged care, community health, mental health, maternal and child health, medical clinics and prisons.

The core business of the ANMF (Vic Branch) is the representation of the professional and industrial interests of our members and the professions of nursing and midwifery. Additionally, the ANMF (Vic Branch) provides both nationally accredited courses and offers face to face and online professional development for nurses, midwives and personal care workers through the ANMF (Vic Branch) Education Centre.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 12600 A'Beckett Street Melbourne Victoria 8006 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 9602 8500

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 8:45am-5:00pm. The library is closed on weekends and during public holidays.

Location

Level 1 535 Elizabeth St Melbourne Victoria

View on Google Maps

The library holds specialist print collections relating to nursing and midwifery practice, education, history and working conditions. Our special collection includes primary materials from the historic 1986 50-day Victorian nurses strike and UNA, the journal of the Victorian Trained Nurses Association (1903-1974).

These records are digitised by this organisation on Victorian Collections for the purposes of education and preservation. If you believe that we have infringed your copyright please contact us and we will remove the material from the site.

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78 items

'Ask me! I'm a nurse' nursing badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with white text 'Ask me! I'm a Nurse'.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The title for a 'Grade 1' nurse is now a 'Division 1' or (more commonly) 'Registered Nurse'. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right).

Australian Nursing Federation pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular white, blue and silver pin. Printed with 'AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION' and a large logo ['ANF'].

Historical information

Pin that was likely distributed to union delegates/job representatives of the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF). Job representatives, or 'job reps', represent nurses and midwives and the union in the workplace. They provide information and advice on employee rights and conditions to their colleagues and referrals to the ANF when appropriate. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this pin is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch 'Jeff Kennett' protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue, red and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'I've been 'Jeffed' and I'm paying the Penalty!' and 'ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] VIC. [Victorian] BRANCH'. 'Jeffed' refers to the then Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett (1992-1999).

Historical information

Badge campaigning against the Victorian Liberal government's widespread privatisation of the public health service (and other public services) in the 1990s, which resulted in job cuts and site closures throughout the state. The Australian Nursing Federation, the union representing nurses in Victoria, was a strong opponent of these cuts and closures, that resulted in pressure applied on an already overstretched and poorly resourced group of workers. "In a context of high unemployment and an ideological commitment to small government, there were widespread job losses and people affixed stickers to their cars saying 'I've been Jeffed', i.e. made redundant. The cuts were not confined to government employees and many staff of private enterprises also lost their jobs. This was the era of the 'consulting poor' as professional staff struggled to make a living as independent consultants, rather than employees. They were well paid for short term contracts, but continuity of work was hard to find." (Sally Wilde, 'The History of Prahran 1990-1994', 2000)

Australian Nursing Federation 'Proud to be a nurse' badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue, green and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Proud to be a NURSE' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for greater professional recognition of nurses since its inception as the Victorian Trained Nurses’ Association in 1901. The front cover of the July 2006 issue of the Victorian Branch newsletter 'On the Record' features a nurse wearing a sticker with a similar design as this badge, suggesting it was manufactured and distributed around this time.

Australian Nursing Federation/Western Hospital delegate/member badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular orange/red badge with blue writing and logo. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'ANF at the Western Hospital' the number '45' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn amongst Australian Nursing Federation members employed at Western Hospital (now Footscray Hospital). Possibly worn only by delegates/union representatives at this workplace, and/or celebrating 45 years of the Western Hospital (this occurred in 1998). The Western Hospital changed its name to Footscray Hospital in July 2014 and is located at 160 Gordon St, Footscray, Victoria, Australia.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

'Save our hospital' homemade protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with the hand-drawn red text 'SAVE OUR HOSPITAL' and an image of a bandaged patient in tears.

Australian Nursing Federation WorkChoices protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow, red and white badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue and white ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the black text '[then-Prime Minister John] Howard targets nurses' and a Ron Tandberg cartoon of a nurse with a 'sniper target' overlay.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as part of a 2006 campaign protesting the controversial 'WorkChoices' federal industrial relations laws that were introduced by the Liberal John Howard government in 2005-2007. These laws saw the weakening of unfair dismissal laws, giving employers significantly more powers to strip existing rights and wages away. The laws were repealed following the election of an opposition Labor government in 2007 under Kevin Rudd. The 'Howard Target Nurses' campaign was featured in ANF Victorian Branch newsletters around late 2006. During this period, a number of enterprising bargaining agreements were set to soon expire, leaving nurses vulnerable to have rights stripped away under the new IR legislation. A large campaign began, with rallies across the state of Victoria. The August 2006 Branch newsletter featured images of the Tandberg 'Howard targets nurses' design on placards, shirts and badges worn by nurses at these rallies. The illustration by The Age cartoonist Ron Tandberg made reference to John Howard's involvement in wars in the Middle East throughout the early 2000s, and linked this to the 'war' on unions and worker rights.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1987 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio, featuring audio recording of a members mass meeting at the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre. Historical information on program taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1985 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'The History Show' broadcast about nurses in World War I featuring historian Katie Holmes

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

29 minute audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'The History Show' on 3CR Community Radio. Features feminist historian Katie Holmes speaking on the experience of nurses in World War I.

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow, blue and red badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with '5-4-20' and a blue and red triangle design.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as part of a 2003-2004 campaign to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. The '5-4-20' denotes a minimum of five nurses for twenty patients in a general medical or surgical ward. During this period, staffing ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. This campaign was featured in ANF Victorian Branch newsletters from late 2003 to early 2004. Entitled the '5-4-20 campaign', it was officially launched on 19 November 2003. Advertisements and shirts from the time featured the slogan, '5 nurses for 20 patients. Nothing less!' along with the ANF logo and illustrations by The Age cartoonist Ron Tandberg. The campaign was to promote the role of minimum nurse to patient ratios in ensuring patient safety and encouraging nurse recruitment and retention.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red, white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'FUND NURSING PROPERLY FOR A BETTER STATE OF HEALTH', 'EBA 07' [enterprise bargaining agreement 2007] and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] website address of the time (www.anfvic.asn.au).

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members during the bargaining process for Victorian nurses' wages and conditions in 2007. Enterprise bargaining is the process of negotiation generally between the employer and employees (often represented by a trade union, professional association or other bargaining representative) with the goal of making an enterprise agreement stipulating the wages and conditions of work. The 2007 public sector campaign entitled 'Fund nursing properly for a better state of health' involved the ANF bargaining for members employed in the public acute and aged care sector, public psychiatric services, the Australian Red Cross Blood Service and the Royal District Nursing Service. The 2007 campaign focused on improved workloads and skill mix and a minimum 18 per cent wage increase to address the wage disparity between Victorian nurses and nurses working in other Australian states.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

32-minute video documentary on 1986 Victorian nurses strike - Breaking point: the 1986 nurses strike, 10 years on

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

39 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original videocassette. In colour, with sound. Original was released with a booklet explaining the broader context for the documentary.

Historical information

In October 1986, Victorian nurses began an historic strike action which was to last 50 days. Breaking Point (1998) is a retrospective work, reflecting on the 10 years following the 1986 Victorian strike. It was produced by Mark Bird and Nicholas Bird (of Waterbyrd Filmz, the production company that, as outlined above, also made Vivien Bullwinkel, Nurse TV and Australian Nurses). In this film, it is not primarily images of striking nurses and the words of striking nurses that tell the story, but the voice-over. The narrator (Patrick J. Bonello) positions the strike alongside other national and world events of 1986, ‘the year that changed the nursing profession in Australia forever’. In this film, the strike is framed as a pivotal one in the history of Australian nurses, and one that affected individual nurses deeply and transformed their profession irrevocably. There is a conscious discussion on the emotional effects of the 1986 strike – relationships broke up, people had no money, unionists could not feed their families, it was hard to keep going, families fought over the strike, picketing nurses recalled getting spat at, and there was even a death threat. [Description adapted from Milner & Brigden, 2014, pp. 116; 118]

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch Enrolled Nurse badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and orange plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge bordered with blue text 'ENROLLED NURSES & THE AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION VICTORIAN BRANCH' and the italicised, centred text 'The Future is in our Hands'.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and yellow badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'no more than 1 to 4'.

Historical information

Button worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as an ongoing campaign in the 1990s to 2000s to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. 'no more than 1 to 4' denotes a ratio of one nurse to a maximum of four patients. During this period, staffing ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015.

'Hands off Medicare' protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and green plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with the green text 'HANDS OFF MEDICARE'.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation aged care campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular pink and black plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Aged care WORTH MORE NOT LESS' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. 'NOT LESS' is underlined.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for more funding and qualified nurses to improve the quality of aged care for the past several decades, and continues to do so. The 'Aged care nurses worth more not less' campaign was run throughout 2005-2006 during private aged care enterprise bargaining negotiations. Claims focused on unsafe staffing levels and an inadequate skill mix of registered and unregistered staff. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue and white plastic button. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'WHITE LIES = WAGE CASUALTIES' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victoria]'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, probably during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The 'White' in 'WHITE LIES' refers to David Ronald White, who was a state M.P. and the Victorian Minister for Health from 1985-1989. David White regularly featured in Branch newsletters around the time of the strike, and was regularly portrayed as a magician, skilled in 'white magic' that made 'nurses wages disappear'. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'hands off nurses' awards!' and 'AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation members campaigning against changes to nurses awards. The minimum wages and conditions an employee is entitled to are set out in awards (also known as modern awards). Awards don’t apply when an employer has an enterprise agreement or other registered agreement and the employee is covered by it. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Smash and Grab' broadcast featuring nurses and guests discussing Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Three audio files (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'Smash and Grab' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch delegate pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Red, black and gold pin in the shape of the state of Victoria, Australia. Printed with 'ANF AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION REPRESENTATIVE'.

Historical information

Pin awarded to, and worn by, union delegates/job representatives of the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF). Job representatives, or 'job reps', represent nurses and midwives and the union in the workplace. They provide information and advice on employee rights and conditions and referrals to the ANF when appropriate. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this pin is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with an illustration of patients, a triangle design and with the words 'PROFESSIONAL', 'PRACTICE', 'STANDARDS', 'CARE' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation]'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.