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Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Melbourne, Victoria

The Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has a membership of more than 80,000 nurses, midwives and carers employed in a range of health services including hospitals, aged care, community health, mental health, maternal and child health, medical clinics and prisons.

The core business of the ANMF (Vic Branch) is the representation of the professional and industrial interests of our members and the professions of nursing and midwifery. Additionally, the ANMF (Vic Branch) provides both nationally accredited courses and offers face to face and online professional development for nurses, midwives and personal care workers through the ANMF (Vic Branch) Education Centre.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 12600 A'Beckett Street Melbourne Victoria 8006 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 9602 8500

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 8:45am-5:00pm. The library is closed on weekends and during public holidays.

Location

Level 1 535 Elizabeth St Melbourne Victoria

View on Google Maps

The library holds specialist print collections relating to nursing and midwifery practice, education, history and working conditions. Our special collection includes primary materials from the historic 1986 50-day Victorian nurses strike and UNA, the journal of the Victorian Trained Nurses Association (1903-1974).

These records are digitised by this organisation on Victorian Collections for the purposes of education and preservation. If you believe that we have infringed your copyright please contact us and we will remove the material from the site.

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78 items

1987 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio, featuring audio recording of a members mass meeting at the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre. Historical information on program taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Smash and Grab' broadcast featuring nurses and guests discussing Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Three audio files (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'Smash and Grab' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1985 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'The History Show' broadcast about nurses in World War I featuring historian Katie Holmes

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

29 minute audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'The History Show' on 3CR Community Radio. Features feminist historian Katie Holmes speaking on the experience of nurses in World War I.

29-minute video documentary on the history of the Victorian nurses union - The rise and rise of the Victorian nurses' union

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

29 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original DVD. In colour, with sound. Original distributed (not sold) on DVD.

32-minute video documentary on 1986 Victorian nurses strike - Breaking point: the 1986 nurses strike, 10 years on

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

39 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original videocassette. In colour, with sound. Original was released with a booklet explaining the broader context for the documentary.

Historical information

In October 1986, Victorian nurses began an historic strike action which was to last 50 days. Breaking Point (1998) is a retrospective work, reflecting on the 10 years following the 1986 Victorian strike. It was produced by Mark Bird and Nicholas Bird (of Waterbyrd Filmz, the production company that, as outlined above, also made Vivien Bullwinkel, Nurse TV and Australian Nurses). In this film, it is not primarily images of striking nurses and the words of striking nurses that tell the story, but the voice-over. The narrator (Patrick J. Bonello) positions the strike alongside other national and world events of 1986, ‘the year that changed the nursing profession in Australia forever’. In this film, the strike is framed as a pivotal one in the history of Australian nurses, and one that affected individual nurses deeply and transformed their profession irrevocably. There is a conscious discussion on the emotional effects of the 1986 strike – relationships broke up, people had no money, unionists could not feed their families, it was hard to keep going, families fought over the strike, picketing nurses recalled getting spat at, and there was even a death threat. [Description adapted from Milner & Brigden, 2014, pp. 116; 118]

28-minute video documentary on nurse to patient ratios in Victoria - Battle : the road to ratios [legislation]

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

28 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format). In colour, with sound. Original produced digitally.

Historical information

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Branch (Vic Branch) members achieved staffing ratios in the Victorian public health system in 2000 and campaigned throughout 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2011-12 to keep them in workplace agreements. After strong campaigning, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. The short digital documentary, 'Battle: The Road to Ratios [Legislation]', tells the story of this campaigning, from the nurse shortage crisis in 2000 to ratio laws in 2015. The documentary, produced by Black Sheep Films, was first shown at the 2016 Annual Delegates Conference to more than 700 ANMF Job Reps and Health and Safety Reps. The documentary features interviews with current and former ANMF leadership and Job Reps, academics, and journalists.

44-minute video documentary on 1986 Victorian nurses strike - Running out of patience : the 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

44 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original videocassette. In colour, with sound. Original was released with a booklet explaining the broader context for the documentary.

Historical information

In October 1986, Victorian nurses began an historic strike action which was to last 50 days. This video is the nurses version of the dispute. Despite widespread condemnation mainly from the media, the nurses eventually won out for an appropriate career structure including significant pay increases. Actual strike footage together with nursing training films and old photographs explore vocational stereotypes and place the strike in the context of the current crisis in the health care system.

Australian Nursing Federation aged care recruitment fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and blue fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSING keeps the CARE in aged CARE', 'Join the [Australian Nursing Federation] ANF', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and red fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'The ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] represents Nurses ... ALL NURSES', 'For advice & assistance', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and red fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSES. you can't live without them!', the Australian Nursing Federation logo and phone number ('03-9274 9333').

Australian Nursing Federation keyring

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rounded rectangular keyring. Keyring is printed with the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo and text, 'the key to nursing'.

Historical information

Merchandise from the Australian Nursing Federation, given/sold to union members and staff.

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and blue fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'ANF [Australian Nursing Federation]', 'Caring for NURSES', 'ALL NURSES', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch Enrolled Nurse badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and orange plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge bordered with blue text 'ENROLLED NURSES & THE AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION VICTORIAN BRANCH' and the italicised, centred text 'The Future is in our Hands'.

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with text 'I'm losing patient with industrial changes' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Australian Nursing Federation International Nurses Day badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow and blue badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the blue text 'International Nurses Day', '12 May 2002', and 'Celebrating Nursing'.