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Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Melbourne, Victoria

The Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has a membership of more than 80,000 nurses, midwives and carers employed in a range of health services including hospitals, aged care, community health, mental health, maternal and child health, medical clinics and prisons.

The core business of the ANMF (Vic Branch) is the representation of the professional and industrial interests of our members and the professions of nursing and midwifery. Additionally, the ANMF (Vic Branch) provides both nationally accredited courses and offers face to face and online professional development for nurses, midwives and personal care workers through the ANMF (Vic Branch) Education Centre.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 12600 A'Beckett Street Melbourne Victoria 8006 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 9602 8500

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 8:45am-5:00pm. The library is closed on weekends and during public holidays.

Location

Level 1 535 Elizabeth St Melbourne Victoria

View on Google Maps

The library holds specialist print collections relating to nursing and midwifery practice, education, history and working conditions. Our special collection includes primary materials from the historic 1986 50-day Victorian nurses strike and UNA, the journal of the Victorian Trained Nurses Association (1903-1974).

These records are digitised by this organisation on Victorian Collections for the purposes of education and preservation. If you believe that we have infringed your copyright please contact us and we will remove the material from the site.

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78 items

Royal Australian Nursing Federation strike remembrance badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
industrial action
strike action
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
1986 victorian nurses strike
trade unions
labour history
royal australian nursing federation

Circular red and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'I FOUGHT NURSES STRIKE 1986' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses who took part in campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, particularly those involved in the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. In October 1986, Victorian nurses began their longest strike after the failure of repeated talks with the health minister David White who was committed to reducing the classification and pay of almost half of Victoria’s nurses. Skeleton staff were left in the wards while picket lines, tents and caravans were set up outside hospitals in both metropolitan and regional Victoria. After 50 days of industrial action, Victorian nurses voted to return to work on 20 December 1986. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, and the strike concluded in December 1986, suggesting this badge was produced sometime between 1987 and 1989.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Key words

nursing
nurses
unionism
trade unions
merchandise
fridge magnet
magnet
australian nursing federation

Rectangular gold and red fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSES. you can't live without them!', the Australian Nursing Federation logo and phone number ('03-9274 9333').

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation mental health campaign badge

Key words

nurses
mental health
nursing
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
australian nursing federation
funding

Circular red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'UNSHACKLE MENTAL HEALTH', the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo and an image of broken chains and shackles.

Historical information

nurses, unionism, badges, buttons, pins, trade unions, labour history, australian nursing federation, staffing, workforce, patient care

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation aged care campaign badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
unionism
aged care
lobbying
funding
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
staffing
workforce
patient care

Circular pink and black plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Aged care WORTH MORE NOT LESS' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. 'NOT LESS' is underlined.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for more funding and qualified nurses to improve the quality of aged care for the past several decades, and continues to do so. The 'Aged care nurses worth more not less' campaign was run throughout 2005-2006 during private aged care enterprise bargaining negotiations. Claims focused on unsafe staffing levels and an inadequate skill mix of registered and unregistered staff. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Key words

nursing
enrolled nurses
division 2 nurses
nurses
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
patient care
australian nursing federation
victoria

Circular green and purple badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'A.N.F. [Australian Nursing Federation] securing a future for Enrolled Nurses'.

Historical information

Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) badge promoting Enrolled Nurses (also known as Division 2 Nurses, ENs). ENs are registered health practitioners who have completed, at a minimum, a diploma qualification in order to practice. ENs typically work under the direction and supervision of a registered nurse to provide support and care for patients in a range of healthcare settings. This badge was possibly distributed to ANF EN members attending the 1999 Annual ANF Division 2 Conference that focused on pathways to the future for this group of nurses. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, further suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation/Western Hospital delegate/member badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
badges
buttons
pins
western hospital
western health
footscray hospital
melbourne
victoria

Circular orange/red badge with blue writing and logo. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'ANF at the Western Hospital' the number '45' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn amongst Australian Nursing Federation members employed at Western Hospital (now Footscray Hospital). Possibly worn only by delegates/union representatives at this workplace, and/or celebrating 45 years of the Western Hospital (this occurred in 1998). The Western Hospital changed its name to Footscray Hospital in July 2014 and is located at 160 Gordon St, Footscray, Victoria, Australia.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
unionism
royal australian nursing federation
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
lobbying
trade unions
labour history

Circular black and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with an illustration of patients, a triangle design and with the words 'PROFESSIONAL', 'PRACTICE', 'STANDARDS', 'CARE' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation]'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Customised Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Key words

nursing
industrial action
nurses
strike action
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
1986 victorian nurses strike
trade unions
labour history

Circular white and blue plastic badge, customised with black permanent marker. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right). (Unknown) former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

Inscriptions & Markings

Former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

'Save our hospital' homemade protest badge

Key words

politics
protest
public protest
hospitals
public institutions
political protest
campaigning
badges
buttons
pins

Circular white and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with the hand-drawn red text 'SAVE OUR HOSPITAL' and an image of a bandaged patient in tears.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Key words

nurses
nursing
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
australian nursing federation
wages
working conditions
employment

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'hands off nurses' awards!' and 'AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation members campaigning against changes to nurses awards. The minimum wages and conditions an employee is entitled to are set out in awards (also known as modern awards). Awards don’t apply when an employer has an enterprise agreement or other registered agreement and the employee is covered by it. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation nurse training campaign badge

Key words

nurses
nursing
badges
education
training
qualifications
university
australian nursing federation
workforce
midwives
midwifery
undergraduate
registered nurse
registered midwife
buttons
pins

Circular blue and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with the white text 'University education for all Div[ision] 1 RNs [Registered Nurses] and [Registered Midwives]' and a small black and white image of a square academic/trencher cap.

Historical information

Button worn and distributed to staff and interested parties as part of a campaign that supported maintaining bachelor of nursing and midwivery programs in the university system. In late 2007-2008, regulatory authorities in Victoria were considering the possibility of education providers from the Vocational Education & Training (VET) sector (e.g. TAFEs and RTOs) receiving accreditation to offer bachelor-level nursing and midwifery qualifications. The Australian Nursing Federation (Victorian Branch), the peak industrial and professional body for Victorian nurses and midwives, resisted these moves, arguing that the approval of VET providers to offer Bachelor programs would have an adverse impact on the supply of registered nurses into the Victorian health workforce. Completion of a bachelor of nursing or midwifery remains a precondition of practising as a registered ('division 1') nurse or midwife in Australia.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
ratios
workforce
staffing
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
safe patient care (nurse to patient and midwife to patient ratios) act 2015
victoria

Circular black and yellow badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'no more than 1 to 4'.

Historical information

Button worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as an ongoing campaign in the 1990s to 2000s to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. 'no more than 1 to 4' denotes a ratio of one nurse to a maximum of four patients. During this period, staffing ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

28-minute video documentary on nurse to patient ratios in Victoria - Battle : the road to ratios [legislation]

Key words

nursing
ratios
workforce
nursing workforce
staffing
nurses
unionism
documentaries
campaigning
labour history
safe patient care (nurse to patient and midwife to patient ratios) act 2015
victoria
australia

28 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format). In colour, with sound. Original produced digitally.

Historical information

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Branch (Vic Branch) members achieved staffing ratios in the Victorian public health system in 2000 and campaigned throughout 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2011-12 to keep them in workplace agreements. After strong campaigning, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. The short digital documentary, 'Battle: The Road to Ratios [Legislation]', tells the story of this campaigning, from the nurse shortage crisis in 2000 to ratio laws in 2015. The documentary, produced by Black Sheep Films, was first shown at the 2016 Annual Delegates Conference to more than 700 ANMF Job Reps and Health and Safety Reps. The documentary features interviews with current and former ANMF leadership and Job Reps, academics, and journalists.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation aged care campaign badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
unionism
aged care
lobbying
2001 federal election
funding
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
staffing
workforce
patient care

Circular orange and dark blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Aged Care. Who Cares? I care.' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. 'I Care.' is underlined.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for more funding and qualified nurses to improve the quality of aged care for the past several decades, and continues to do so. This particular badge is from a 2001 campaign in the lead up to a November 2001 Australian federal election. The campaign called on the government and opposition to make commitments to around aged care staffing and funding. Branch newsletters from late 2001 focused on aged care staff shortages & under-funding, with placards from rallies featuring slogans such as 'Aged care nurses. We care. Do you?' and 'Aged care. Who care? We care'. Therefore, it is believed that this badge was manufactured and distributed from August to December 2001.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Key words

nursing
ratios
workforce
staffing
nurses
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
trade unions
labour history
safe patient care (nurse to patient and midwife to patient ratios) act 2015
australian nursing federation
victoria
enterprise bargaining

Circular yellow, blue and red badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with '5-4-20' and a blue and red triangle design.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as part of a 2003-2004 campaign to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. The '5-4-20' denotes a minimum of five nurses for twenty patients in a general medical or surgical ward. During this period, staffing ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. This campaign was featured in ANF Victorian Branch newsletters from late 2003 to early 2004. Entitled the '5-4-20 campaign', it was officially launched on 19 November 2003. Advertisements and shirts from the time featured the slogan, '5 nurses for 20 patients. Nothing less!' along with the ANF logo and illustrations by The Age cartoonist Ron Tandberg. The campaign was to promote the role of minimum nurse to patient ratios in ensuring patient safety and encouraging nurse recruitment and retention.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation aged care recruitment fridge magnet

Key words

nursing
nurses
unionism
aged care
recruitment
trade unions
merchandise
fridge magnet
magnet
australian nursing federation

Rectangular gold and blue fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSING keeps the CARE in aged CARE', 'Join the [Australian Nursing Federation] ANF', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch Enrolled Nurse badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
enrolled nurses
division 2 nurses
nursing workforce
workforce
badges
buttons
pins
ens
trade unions
labour history
australian nursing federation
victoria

Circular white and orange plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge bordered with blue text 'ENROLLED NURSES & THE AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION VICTORIAN BRANCH' and the italicised, centred text 'The Future is in our Hands'.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

'Save Fairfield Hospital' badge

Key words

medicine
health
public institutions
fairfield
victoria
city of darebin
melbourne
politics
political protest
public protest
campaigning
badges
buttons
pins
public health
infectious diseases
aids

Circular white and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with the red text 'SAVE FAIRFIELD HOSPITAL'. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back.

Historical information

Fairfield Hospital opened in 1904 as the Queen's Memorial Infectious Diseases Hospital, the first purpose-built isolation hospital for infectious diseases in Victoria. Its 22-acre site was located on a bank of the Yarra River. It was renamed Fairfield Hospital in 1948. In its later years, the hospital was a centre for AIDS treatment in Victoria, and a passionate campaign fought against its planned closure in the 1990s. Fairfield Hospital finally closed in June 1996. One section of the site was gazetted as a Public Park and Memorial Garden (containing an AIDS Garden).

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Key words

3cr
community radio
melbourne
history
labour history
nurses
royal australian nursing federation
strikes
industrial action
trade unions
1986 victorian nurses strike
nursing
strike action
unionism
strikes and lockouts
victoria
feminism

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

no image

29-minute video documentary on the history of the Victorian nurses union - The rise and rise of the Victorian nurses' union

Key words

nursing
ratios
1986 victorian nurses strike
industrial action
industrial relations
labour history
staffing
unionism
nurses
campaigning
organising
documentaries
feminism
victoria
australia

29 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original DVD. In colour, with sound. Original distributed (not sold) on DVD.

Historical information

The short documentary 'The rise and rise of the Victorian nurses' union' was released on DVD only in 2006. It tells the story of the Branch from its inception, charting major industrial and professional developments for nurses in Victoria over the past century. In particular, it focuses on the shortage of nurses that Victoria experienced from the 1970s to the 1990s, the removal of the 'no-strike' clause from the organisation's rules, the resultant historic 50-day 1986 Victorian nurses' strike and the growth in membership in the context of overall declining union membership in Australia.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch campaign badge

Key words

nursing
emergency department
hospital
accident and emergency
nurses
emergency nurses
badges
buttons
pins
trade unions
labour history
patient care
australian nursing federation
victoria

Circular green and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'EMERGENCY NURSES', 'Fighting For Your Life' and 'Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members working in emergency departments. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Key words

nursing
nurses
industrial action
strike action
unionism
badges
buttons
pins
campaigning
1986 victorian nurses strike
trade unions
labour history
royal australian nursing federation

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The title for a 'Grade 1' nurse is now a 'Division 1' or (more commonly) 'Registered Nurse'. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right).

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Royal Australian Nursing Federation student nurse pin

Key words

nursing
nurses
students
education
badges
pins
nursing history
royal australian nursing federation

Oval-shaped green, red and gold pin. pin printed with 'R.A.N.F.' [Royal Australian Nursing Federation], 'STUDENT NURSE UNIT', and the acronym 'SNU' in the shape of Australia.

Historical information

Pin given to, and worn by, student nurse members of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation (R.A.N.F.). This badge is likely from a period when nursing education was moving from hospital-based training to tertiary settings. A 2013 report from the Federal Department of Health provides this following overview of nursing education: "during the mid-1980s, nursing education commenced a period of change from being hospital-based to being conducted in tertiary settings, with practical clinical experience components. By 1993, all registered nursing students in Australia were entering the profession via the university education pathway". The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the 1980s.

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne