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Carlton Football Club Carlton North, Victoria

The Carlton Football Club, founded in 1864, is the third oldest of the Victorian-based league clubs and in 1897 became a foundation member of the VFL (now AFL). It has been victorious in more Grand Finals than any other club in League history.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 83 Carlton North Victoria 3054
phone
+61 9389 6200; (03) 9387 1400

Contact

Location

Ikon Park 400 Royal Parade Carlton North Victoria

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Membership Ticket - 1938 Carlton FC Membership Ticket

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Small Cardboard Ticket Four Pages

Historical information

Membership Ticket Premiership Year 1038

Significance

The Membership ticket is from a Premiership year and also depicts Board Members & VFL fixture for 1938 season. There four or five autographs inside, the players are Captain Coach Brighton Diggins, Ken Baxter, Creswell Crisp and Jack Wrout all 1938 Premiership Players.

Inscriptions & Markings

Pencil autographs inside page; one player maybe K Baxter

Colour Magazine - AFL Record - Semi-Finals 2000 - Carlton vs Brisbane Lions

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour magazine

Historical information

AFL Record - Semi-Finals 2000 - Carlton vs Brisbane Lions Carlton 3.3 10.5 18.9 23.13 151 Sat 19-Aug-2000 2:30 PM Att: 56,924 Venue: M.C.G. Brisbane Lions 3.1 4.4 9.4 10.9 69 Carlton won by 82 pts Goals - Hamill 7, Fevola 4, Allan 3

Hardcover Book - Football Record 1946

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Blue hardcover book

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1946 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the season of 1946. Captain: Bob Chitty Coach: Percy Bentley Leading Goal-kicker: Ken Baxter - 46 goals Best & Fairest: Jack Howell

Hard Cover Book - Football Record 1915

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

2 x Hardcover Book, worn

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1915 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the season of 1915. Carlton won their fifth VFL/AFL premiership in 1915 defeating Collingwood at the MCG by 33 points. Carlton 2.5 6.6 6.8 11.12 78 Sat 18-Sep-1915 2:50 PM Att: 39,343 Venue: M.C.G. Collingwood 3.0 4.2 5.9 6.9 45 Carlton won by 33 pts Coach – Norman Clark Captain – Billy Dick Leading Goal-kicker – Herb Burleigh 46 goals

Hardcover Book - Football Record - First Round - 1975 - Carlton

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Hardcover book, navy blue

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1975 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the home and away season of 1975. Coach: John Nicholls Captain: Alex Jesaulenko Vice Captain: Robert Walls Leading goal scorer: Robert Walls - 59 goals

Hardcover Book - Kouta

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

Anthony Koutoufides - Biography/Autobiography Date of birth 18 January 1973 (age 46) Original team(s) Lalor Debut Round 13, 1992, Carlton vs. Adelaide, at Princes Park Height 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) Weight 100 kg (220 lb) Years Club Games (Goals) 1992–2007 Carlton 278 (226) Career highlights Leigh Matthews Trophy (AFLPA MVP): 2000 Robert Reynolds Trophy: 2001, 2005 All Australian: 1995, 2000 Carlton Captain: 2004–2006 Carlton Leading Goalkicker: 1997 Carlton premiership team: 1995 AFL and Carlton life-member Victorian State of Origin: 1999 Australian Football Hall of Fame inductee 2014 Greek Team of the Century: Vice-Captain VFL/AFL Italian Team of the Century: Centre Half-Back

Significance

Book outlining Career & Life of one of Carlton's most popular & gifted players. Kouta was a match winner whose career was curtailed by injury. Kouta's most famous game was Carlton's 1 point win over Essendon 1999 Prelim Final

Letter to player - Letter to Roger Skien from Stephen Gough

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Paper letter, written on typewriter

Historical information

A formal letter written from 1984 Carlton Football Manager Stephen Gough, to Roger Skien. In a year where the club finished 3rd on the VFL ladder, and were eventually knocked out of finals in straight sets by Collingwood. This was Roger's first year at the club as the Team Manager.

Inscriptions & Markings

Well done Roger; a great effort in your first year and one that I truly appreciate as do many others who have been involved. Signed Stephen Gough

Framed VFL Grand Final Ticket - 1938 Victorian Football League Grand Final Ticket Sept 24th Melbourne Cricket Ground Competing Club. Complimentary Ticket for Club Officials & Players only

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Brownish frame, 150mm x 10mm (6x4) wood &, cardboard & glass frame. The ticket is centered within the frame

Historical information

VFL Complimentary GF Ticket 1938 GF

Significance

The Framed Ticket is for the 1938 GF is exclusively for Club Officials & Players only. 1938 was a premiership year for Carlton FC

Black & White Team Photo

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Postcard size Black & White photo

Historical information

Picture of Carlton's Premiership Team & Coach Ron Barassi. Back row: Gordon Casey, Barry Gill, Neil Chandler, Bill Bennett, Adrian Gallagher, Denis Munari. 2nd row: Ron Auchettl, Ian Robertson, Bryan Quirk, Peter Smith, Bob Edmond, Brian Kekovich, Brent Crosswell. 3rd Row: Gary Crane, Ron Stone, Vin Waite, Peter Jones, Robert Walls, Peter McLean, Alex Jesaulenko, Ian Nicoll. Seated: Ian Collins, John Goold, John Nicholls (captain), Ron Barassi (coach), Wes Lofts, Sergio Silvagni, Kevin Hall.

Significance

Carlton FC's first premiership after 21 years, at the time the longest drought premiership in the club's history. The win was the culmination of recruiting Ron Barassi from Melbourne FC in 1965. Ron Barassi leaving Melbourne at the end of the 1964 season was one of the most sensational stories in VFL history. Carlton defeated Essendon 7.14 (56) to 8.5 (53) Att 115828. The game was marred by a blustery wind. Brian Kekovich kicked 4 goals for Carlton and Gary Crane was Carlton's best player.

Paper Book - THE BLUES

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

146 Navy Blue Paperback Magazine compiled by Tim Hewat

Historical information

A pictorial & written history of Carlton FC 1897-1982

Significance

Author and Carlton supporter compiled a history of Carlton from 1897 to a premiership year 1982 with many historic photos and descriptions of different eras of the club. John Malcolm Fraser the then Prime Minister of Australia wrote the foreword.

Poster - Carlton Premiers 1995 (caricatures by Schneider)

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Laminated poster

Historical information

Caricatures of Stephen Kernahan and David Parkin holding up the 1995 premiership cup. Includes autographs of a number of players. From Roger Skien Collection.

Inscriptions & Markings

Contains player autographs

Colour Magazine - The Blues Yearbook 1972

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour Magazine

Historical information

Record of 1972 Premiership Year

Significance

Yearbook of 1972 Premiership Season. The foreword is by the Carlton President George Harris

Inscriptions & Markings

Front Cover many player autographs from 1972 playing list including premiership players. 1972 Summary Carlton would win their 11th Premiership by defeating Richmond by 27 points at the MCG. This win would be our 3rd Premiership in 5 years, and from 4 Grand Finals (1968, 1969, 1970 and 1972) in one of the more successful streaks in our Club's proud history. In a high scoring game, Carlton scored 28.9.177 to Richmond, 22.18.150. 1972 marked the introduction of the final 5 for the first time in VFL history, one year too late for the club, which had finished fifth in the previous year. Carlton and Richmond were by far the best two clubs during the home and away season, with the Blues finishing 1st with an 18 win, 1 draw and 3 loss record, 2 points ahead of the Tigers in second place. The club played consistent footy all year, never losing two games in a row. Winning streaks included 5 in a row (rounds 5 to 9) and 8 in a row to finish the last eight home and away games. With the introduction of the Elimination Final for the first time, Carlton was the only club to have a bye in the first week of finals. In the second week, we would meet Richmond after they had comfortably accounted for Collingwood in the Qualifying Final. The Semi Final would be a great game, with the Blues opening a 13 point lead by three quarter time. Richmond would kick 4 goals in the last term to level the match by the final siren, 8.13 (61) being scored by each side. In the Semi Final Replay the Tigers would kick away from the Blues in the second quarter, winning comfortably and advancing directly to the Grand Final. St Kilda were slightly better than Carlton in the first half of the Preliminary Final, holding an 11 point half time lead. The Blues would show why they were currently a competition power in the second half, kicking 9 goals to 5 to beat the Saints by 16 points, and advance to the clubs fourth Grand Final in five years. Carlton would smash Richmond in the Grand Final, kicking 8 goals in the first quarter, 10 goals in the second, and 7 goals in the third to lead by 54 points at three quarter time. The Tigers would kick 7 goals to 3 in the final term to add some respectability to the final score, but the result was never in doubt. Ladder Pos Team Wins Draws Losses Points For Against % 1 Carlton 18 1 3 74 327.275.2237 228.298.1666 134.3 2 Richmond 18 0 4 72 358.321.2469 293.340.2098 117.7 3 Collingwood 14 1 7 58 343.280.2338 246.271.1747 133.8 4 St Kilda 14 0 8 56 283.291.1989 241.275.1721 115.6 5 Essendon 14 0 8 56 333.319.2317 307.298.2140 108.3 6 Hawthorn 13 0 9 52 324.333.2277 295.280.2050 111.1 7 Footscray 11 0 11 44 273.292.1930 289.304.2038 94.7 8 Melbourne 10 0 12 40 290.303.2043 276.273.1929 105.9 9 Fitzroy 9 0 13 36 282.305.1997 296.286.2062 96.8 10 Geelong 7 0 15 28 285.284.1994 344.305.2369 84.2 11 Sth Melbourne 2 0 20 8 206.277.1513 340.283.2323 65.1 12 Nth Melbourne 1 0 21 4 226.272.1628 375.339.2589 62.9 People of 1972 Captain: John Nicholls Coach: John Nicholls Leading Goal-kicker: Greg Kennedy - 76 Best & Fairest: Geoff Southby Leading Brownlow votes: Alex Jesaulenko, Trevor Keogh - 11 Milestones Debuts: Rod Austin, Eric Pascoe, David Dickson, Greg Kennedy Lower Levels Reserves: The Blues also competed in the Reserves Preliminary Final. The team can be viewed here.

Colour Magazine - CFC 1991 Annual Report and Balance Sheet

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

CFC 1991 ANNUAL REPORT & BALANCE SHEET. Documents club staff, players for 1991 season. Includes records of results and award winners etc

Significance

Foreword by President John Elliot

Hardcover Book - Football Record 1962

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Hardcover book, blue

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1962 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the season of 1962. Carlton would finish as Runner-Up, defeated by Essendon in the 1962 Grand Final. Essendon 6.5 7.7 10.10 13.12 90 Sat 29-Sep-1962 2:50 PM Att: 98,385 Venue: M.C.G. Carlton 1.1 5.6 7.8 8.10 58 Essendon won by 32 pts Coach: Ken Hands Captain: Graham Donaldson Vice Captain: John Nicholls Leading Goal-kicker: Tom Carroll - 62 goals Best & Fairest: Serge Silvagni

Dinner Program & Menu - Carlton Football Club November 21st 1957 to Mr H R Clover

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Four Page Program & Menu 1927

Historical information

Dinner to Mr H R Clover player Career : 1920-24, 1926-31 Debut : Round 2, 1920 vs. Richmond, aged 25 years, 46 days Carlton Player No. 346 Games : 147 Goals : 396 Guernsey No. 1 Last Game : Semi Final, 1931 vs. Collingwood, aged 36 years, 180 days Height : 185 cm (6 ft. 1 in.) Weight : 86.5 kg (13 stone, 9 lbs.) DOB : 20 March, 1895 League Leading Goalkicker: 1922 Leading Goalkicker: 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1926, 1928 Best and Fairest: 1929 Captain Coach: 1922-1924, 1927 Champion of the Colony: 1921 VFL AFL Hall of Fame Carlton Hall of Fame Team of the Century President: 1956-57 Vice President: 1932, 1935-54 Club Secretary: 1925-26 Horace “Horrie” Clover was Carlton’s star centre half-forward of the 1920’s; a high flying, long-kicking champion who enjoyed a stellar career with the Old Dark Navy Blues, then went on to be one of our longest-serving administrators. But even before he took the field for Carlton, Clover had to conquer the odds on the battlefields of France in World War 1. From Maryborough in central Victoria, Horrie enlisted in the 1st AIF in September 1915. After basic training, he embarked for France with reinforcements for the 7th Battalion in January of 1916. Soon pitched into the horrors of trench warfare, he fought and survived until September of that year, when he was transferred to a machine gun company and promoted to the rank of Corporal. On Christmas day, 1916, Horrie was struck down with acute appendicitis. He was evacuated to a field hospital for emergency surgery, where the doctors discovered that his appendix was gangrenous and that his life was in danger. He was immediately transferred to London for specialist treatment, and months of recuperation. Pronounced unfit for further front-line service, he was repatriated back to Australia in August 1917, and honourably discharged in May of the following year – six months before the Armistice. Having recovered, and keen to have a crack at senior football, Clover trained with Richmond and Melbourne before Carlton gave him an opportunity at VFL level. And how he delivered! In his first match in 1920 – ironically, against Richmond - he kicked four goals from centre half-forward, and hit the post three times! By the end of his first season at Princes Park, Clover was one of Carlton’s drawcards. Former Australian Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies was just one of the many Carlton fans who were captivated; “he was the most artistic of high marks, unforgettable at half-forward,” said Menzies. Horrie could kick a football, too. A balanced, deceptively quick mover, he was a glorious running drop-kick for goal. Playing against Richmond again at Princes Park in July, 1921, he let fly with a monster kick that was later measured at 86.26 metres – that’s 94 yards, 2 feet in imperial terms! And there are numerous other instances where he roosted the ball more than 70 metres. In round 12 of 1921, he slotted 13 goals in a game against St Kilda; a club record which still stands today. The Blues made the finals in third place in 1921 and battled through to meet Richmond for the Premiership. Then the heavens above the MCG opened up on the day before the decider, turning the ground into a quagmire. In what was to be Clover’s only Grand Final appearance, Richmond won a slogging, mauling contest by four points. While Premiership glory eluded him, Horrie was Carlton’s top goalkicker in three of his first four seasons, including 1922, where his total of 58 was the competition’s best. He was appointed captain of the Blues that same year, and in 1923 took on the dual role of captain-coach. Over 1924 / 1925, he suffered more debilitating illness that prevented him from playing all season. Unable to pull on his football boots, he took on the job of Club Secretary, and continued in that position even after returning to the field in 1926. When he did eventually resume, he formed a new, powerful Carlton forward set-up with a young Harry “Soapy” Vallence at full-forward. Twice more – in 1926 and 1928, Clover’s brilliance and accuracy in front of goal saw him at the top of Carlton’s goal-kicking, and in 1929 – aged 34, he was honoured with the captaincy of Victoria against WA in his ninth and final game in the Big Vee. show_image.php?id=205 Horrie Clover retired as a player in 1931 after 147 games. His total of 396 goals is still ranked fifth best in Carlton’s proud history (only displaced for fourth when Brendan Fevola broke through in 2007/2008) – and it should be remembered that all but a handful of his games were played at centre half-forward, not in the goal square. In 1932 he was elected Vice-President of the Carlton Football Club, but retired after one year. In February 1935 on learning of Terry Ogden's the serious illness, Clover and Newton Chandler offered their services for a blood transfusion for the club's wing man. After a blood test Chandler's blood was accepted. However, Ogden passed away the next month. Clover stood again in 1935, was elected – and spent twenty unbroken years serving his beloved Blues. He even took on the Presidency in 1956, aged 60, and was as vigorous and determined as ever in his two years in the job. Carlton Football Club mourned deeply when Horrie Clover passed away on the first day of January, 1984. Three years later, he was among the first to be inducted into the Carlton Hall of Fame. Testament to his stature in the game as a whole, he was elected to the AFL Hall of Fame in 1996; and May 2000 saw him named as one of four emergencies in Carlton’s Team of the Century. A champion in every sense of the word, he spent 37 years of his remarkable life at Princes Park. Footnote The Argus published an article on Maryborough, April 12 1930, it said; "Clover has been the leading half-forward in League ranks for some time. It takes a specialist to fill the position capably, and the Carisbrook man does this admirably. Like good wine he has improved with age, and besides being one of the greatest half forwards that has ever appeared on a football field, he is about the best all round kicker that has ever played the game. He excells in punting, drop, and place kicking. He is a great marksman and a splendid exponent, one of the greatest the district has produced, besides being a fair cricketer also." When Clover returned to football in 1926, The Argus mentioned that they thought it was the first time a member of the Permit and Umpire Committee had played in a League game. 13 GOAL AWARD Round 12, 1921 At the Carlton AGM held on Monday 27 February 1922, Horrie Clover "was presented with ball used on the occasion, the St.Kilda club having generously donated it to the Carlton officials, who had it mounted for the purpose." (Age February 22 1922) 1922 The Art Of Forward Play Horrie wrote an article for the Sporting Globe August 30 p7 To read click here> http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article184798404 1928 Idol of Carlton Crowds - Australia's Best Centre Half Forward The Sporting Globe's football writer W. S. "Jumbo" Sharland writes about Horrie Clover To read click here> http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article183958222 Footballer Who Gambles With Death. Daily Pictorial (Sydney) article about Horrie. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article246129350 1932 Jack Worrall on Clover Writing for the Australasian September 03 p7; "Take Horrie Clover as an example, a real specialist, one of the best forwards the game has seen, and the best all-round kick that has ever come under my purview. For that reason he deserves a line to himself. He played the game like a sportsman, was a glorious high mark, and could cover a great distance by either drop, punt, or place kick - a remarkable accomplishment. Many players have been notable kicks in two aspects of the game, yet none have equalled Clover in the three branches. His nearest rival as an all-round kick, though not quite as certain in his efforts, was Frank Caine, of Carlton, who, like Clover, also hailed from the country." 1933 Coming Football Champion Melbourne, Saturday A special warning was issued to the Victorian Football League delegates last night by Mr. D. H. Crone, a Carlton delegate, not to angle for a certain "coming" champion that the Carlton Club had signed up that day. At first delegates were a little puzzled at the statement, but when it was explained that Horrie Clover, former champion half-forward, had that day become the father of of a son they burst into sustained laughter. It was only by persistent ringing of the bell by the chairman that order was restored. (News (Adelaide) May 20 1933 p3) 1933 - The Place Kick A letter to The Argus via the Huon Times about the lack of place kicking expertise in the VFL. The writer mentions that he got Horrie to play football in Maryborough after he saw the then 15 y.o. place kick a ball 63 yards, and later with Carlton, Clover place kicked 8 goals in one match. To read click here> http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137253000 Milestones 50 Games: Round 1, 1923 vs Fitzroy 100 Games: Round 18, 1927 vs St Kilda 100 Goals: Round 18, 1921 vs Collingwood 200 Goals: Round 3, 1924 vs St Kilda 300 Goals: Round 11, 1928 vs Geelong Links Articles: The Magical 'Three Goal Average' | A Letter From Horrie | Our Flagless Greats Blueseum: Stat Shot for Horrie Clover | Career Breakdown | Clover's big goals hauls | Clover's Blueseum Image Gallery

Significance

A dinner to celebrate career Horrie Clover in 1957

Grand Final 1995 Ticket mounted in plastic - Grand Final 1995

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

A plastic stand with 1995 Grand Final Ticket embedded.

Historical information

Ticket for 1995 Grand Final Carlton v Geelong

Significance

Ticket to Carlton's winning 1995 GF, Carlton's 16th Premiership and to date latest (2019).

Membership Tickets - 1943 Carlton FC Membership Ticket

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Small Cardboard Ticket Four Pages

Historical information

1943 Carlton FC Membership Ticket

Significance

Carlton FC Membership Ticket 1943 Season depicts VFL fixture Carlton Board for 1943 & members name & address Mrs C Clover 14 Blair Pl Coburg. Membership No. 1181. The member maybe related Vice President of the club H R Clover.

Inscriptions & Markings

Carlton FC Membership Ticket 1943 Season depicts VFL fixture Carlton Board for 1943 & members name & address Mrs C Clover 14 Blair Pl Coburg. Membership No. 1181. The member maybe related Vice President of the club H R Clover.

Black & White Team Photo - Carlton's Football Team 54 years ago (1870)

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Replica of Black & White photo taken 1870

Historical information

Carlton's Football Team 54 years ago (1870)

Significance

The photograph was taken in 1870 in Royal Park near the point Burke & Wills party left in 1840. Significant people in the group; Ben James Carlton's first secretary & Jack Conway.

Football Record - AFL Record Grand Final 2000

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Glossy magazine. Contains insert poster.

Historical information

From Roger Skien Collection.

Significance

Includes feature on 1979 grand final with Carlton Captain Coach Alex Jesaulenko and Collingwood Captain Ray Shaw discussing each quarter. Includes Ken Sheldon goal from 1979 grand final as a pivotal moment,1972 Carlton victory with record score, 1982 Carlton victory including feature on the Howell family, three generations of premiership players, Jack 1918 (South Melbourne), Jack (Chooka) 1947 Carlton and Scott 1981 Carlton. Peter Dean falling off dais in celebration after the Carlton 1995 victory and John Nicholls being felled in the 1973 loss. Feature on the Silvagni family.

Colour Magazine - Football Record - Grand Final Special Souvenir 1986 - First Edition

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour Magazine

Historical information

Football Record - Grand Final Special Souvenir 1986 - First Edition Hawthorn 5.6 8.8 15.9 16.14 110 Sat 27-Sep-1986 2:50 PM Att: 101,861 Venue: M.C.G. Carlton 1.5 4.11 6.13 9.14 68 Hawthorn won by 42 pts

Framed Colour Team Photo - 1986 Bert Deacon Scholarship Squad

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Wood & Glass Framed Team Photo

Historical information

1986 Bert Deacon Scholarship Squad

Significance

A development squad for 1986 named after Carlton great Bert Deacon. The squad contains players that played senior football for Carlton.Peter White, Fraser Brown (Premiership Player 1995) Ashley Matthews,

Hardcover Book - Football Record 1960

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Hardcover book, blue

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1960 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the season of 1960. Coach: Ken Hands Captain: Bruce Comben Vice Captain: John Chick Leading goal scorer: Leo Brereton - 44 goals Best & Fairest: John James

Colour photograph - Bert Deacon Squad 1990

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour photograph mounted on cardboard

Historical information

Team photograph. From Roger Skien Collection. Records scores of game - final Scores: Carlton 17-16-118 defeated Richmond 3-5-23. Back Row: Mark Leitch (Trainer), John Bekiaris, Paul Scerri, Matt Shotton, Gavin Green, Andrew Petridis, Danny Waters, Peter Ward, Keith Leitch (head Trainer) Centre Row: Kinnear Beatson (Development Officer), Adam McConnell, Wayne Charlton, Paul Malcolm, Mathew Carmichael, Michael Robertson, Bradley Smith, Tony Jones, Glenn Indian, Danny Corsetti, Patrick Hall, Russell Roberts (Trainer). Front Row: Roger Skien (Team Manager), Paul Mullarvey, Paul Rastevski, Chris Doyle, Darren Sharp (Captain), Trevor Keogh (Coach), Aaron Roche (Vice Captain), Peter Diciero, David Watson, Karson Stimson, Antony Clarkson (Assistant Manager).

Colour Poster - Carlton The Mighty Blues, Finalists 1988 (caricatures by Weg)

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour poster

Historical information

Caricatures of players from 1988. From Roger Skien Collection.

Paperback Book - The Dominator

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

192 Page Paperback book

Historical information

Biography written with Ron Reed of one of Carlton's greatest players

Significance

Wayne Johnston played in four Carlton Premierships, 1979,1981,1982 & 1987. He was known for his ability to bring his best games to finals. A damaging left foot and a fierce determination Wayne was a pivotal player in a golden era for Carlton.

Inscriptions & Markings

Signature inside cover appears to be "J Upton"

Hardcover Book - Football Record - First Round - 1976 - Carlton

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Hardcover book, navy blue

Historical information

Hardcover book made in 1976 made to keep original copies of “The Football Record”. This book contains all Football Records relating to Carlton games for the home and away season of 1976. Captain: Alex Jesaulenko Coach: Ian Thorogood Leading Goal-kicker: Robert Walls - 55 goals Best & Fairest: Trevor Keogh

Brochure - The Blues Seat For Life Program - Brochure

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

small coloured brochure

Historical information

Brochure advertising "The Blues Seat For Life Program" prior to the 1996 season and the opening of the new Eastern End Stand at Princes Park. This program gave members first opportunity to renew their reserved seat for following seasons.

Colour Program - 1999 Best & Fairest evening program

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Navy blue and white 4 page program printed on white cardboard.

Historical information

A program handed out during the 1999 Best and Fairest night, held at Moonee Valley Race Course. Includes the format for the night and vote card for senior players in 1999. Award won by Matthew Allan, number 24.

Scrap Book - Dedicated to Carlton Player John Goold

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Foolscap Scrap Book

Historical information

John Goold double Premiership Player

Significance

A scrap Book dedicated to twice Premiership Player 1968 - 1970 John Goold Career : 1963 - 1970 Debut : Round 7, 1963 vs Footscray, aged 21 years, 338 days Carlton Player No. 754 Games : 108 Goals : 3 Last Game : Grand Final, 1970 vs Collingwood, aged 29 years, 90 days Guernsey No. 11 Height : 184 cm (6 ft ½ in.) Weight : 76 kg (12 stone, 0 lbs.) DOB : June 27, 1941 Premiership Player 1968, 1970 Carlton Hall of Fame All Australian 1966 A brilliant, flamboyant, two-time Premiership player for Carlton during the Barassi years in the ‘swingin’ sixties,’ John William Crosbie Goold became almost as famous for his dapper appearance off the field, as for his exploits on it. At the height of his football career, he was also a prominent ladies fashion designer – which led to him being dubbed ‘Mr Elegance’ by leading football commentator Lou Richards. Supporters and team-mates however, called him ‘Rags’ or ‘Ragsy,’ because of his involvement in the clothing, or ‘rag’ trade. Goold first came under notice as an outstanding junior athlete at Melbourne Grammar School. A true all-round sportsman, he shone at tennis, athletics, football and cricket. He was also a keen horseman who loved the game of polo and the rough and tumble of fox hunting. While at school he was a fervent Melbourne supporter, but strangely, never had much confidence in his football ability. “If I thought I was good enough, I would certainly have gone to Melbourne,” he said many years later. “But I honestly didn’t think I would ever amount to anything in this game. Cricket and tennis were the games that really interested me.’ However, after graduating from MGS, Goold went home to Healesville to star in the Bloods’ 1962 Yarra Valley Football Association Premiership team – an achievement that brought tempting offers from more than one VFL club. “Incentives were offered elsewhere,” he recalled, “but I gravitated to Carlton – partly because the deep blue of their guernsey attracted me, but mostly because of the good advice I got from people who even then were longsighted enough to predict that big things were ahead for this club.” The Blues were confident enough in Goold’s potential to offer him the guernsey number 11 previously worn with distinction by the likes of Jack Hale, Jim Knight, Ron Hines and Laurie Kerr, and his first senior game came in round 7, 1963 against Footscray at the Western Oval. He played on a half-forward flank alongside Brownlow Medallists Gordon Collis and John James on that Saturday afternoon, and kicked his first career goal in an 8-point win. Little did he know though, that it would be another six seasons before he would again experience the thrill of sending a football spinning between the big posts, because his future lay in defence. By his own admission, Goold struggled to find his feet in VFL football during his first two seasons, until the shock appointment of Ron Barassi as captain-coach of Carlton in 1965 began steering his career back on track. “I think you could say that 1965 was my first year of League football,” he said, “That’s the way I felt - that’s the way I reacted to Barassi.” Under Barassi, Goold rapidly developed into a superb running half-back flanker. Tenacious, and an often freakish high mark, he was unmistakable on the field thanks to his mane of dark hair, his loping running style and somewhat awkward kicking action. Furthermore, he had boundless courage. There is no doubt that he would have played many more games had he not been regularly pole-axed under the high ball – a fact he later freely admitted. “I was always getting knocked out,” he said, “and spent half my bloody time in hospital.” In the second half of 1965, an injury to centre half-back Gordon Collis forced Barassi to use Goold in the key defensive post. While it curtailed his rebounding instincts somewhat, ‘Ragsy’ rose to the challenge and rarely lowered his colours. Testament to his improvement, he finished third behind John Nicholls and Sergio Silvagni in Carlton’s 1965 Best and Fairest award, and followed up by being selected in the Victorian team for the 1966 Hobart Carnival. There, he had a superb series in which he was runner-up to West Australian Barry Cable in voting for the Tassie Medal, and capped it off by being named on a half-back flank in the All Australian team. Barassi’s influence at Carlton bore fruit in his third year, when the Blues returned to finals football at last. Richmond, Carlton, Geelong and Collingwood fought out the 1967 Premiership, and Ragsy Goold won the hearts of the Carlton faithful with two lion-hearted performances. Although Carlton was knocked out of contention by successive losses to Richmond and Geelong, Goold was tireless throughout both games, and it was obvious that he thrived on the added pressure of finals football. Precisely twelve months later, the bitter taste of those defeats was washed away when Barassi’s Blues edged out Essendon by 3 points in the 1968 Grand Final, and ended 21 years of despair at Princes Park. To win Carlton’s ninth VFL flag, the Blues had had to defeat the minor premier Bombers twice during the finals – and did so, thanks to a watertight defence led by Goold, and a dominant ruck division headed by John Nicholls. In round 5, 1969, Carlton hosted South Melbourne at Princes Park in a match significant for a number of reasons. As he regularly did, Ron Barassi swung his team around prior to the opening bounce, and Goold found himself in the unaccustomed role of ruck-rover. While the Blues set about establishing a good break on the scoreboard, Ragsy relished the freedom to kick two first half goals - his first majors for 78 games. Just before half-time however, he was flattened in a pack, concussed again, and replaced during the long break by Barry Gill. Alex Jesaulenko was substituted at the same time – by a shy, ambitious youngster named Bruce Doull, making his senior debut for Carlton in guernsey number 4. In September, 1969 the Navy Blues began their third straight finals campaign with an impressive 6-goal Semi Final win over Collingwood in front of more than 108,000 fans at the MCG. A fortnight later, Richmond stunned the flag favourites with a withering last quarter in the Grand Final, and knocked Carlton out of the Premiership race again at the last hurdle. Half-way through the year, Carlton's club doctor discovered that Goold had been playing with shin splints in both of his lower legs. The pain they caused was considerable, but Ragsy soldiered on and held down centre half-back throughout the season. John Goold’s VFL career at Carlton culminated in the fabled 1970 Grand Final triumph over Collingwood. What is not so well known is that Ragsy was only cleared to play in that game on the morning of the match. After narrowly losing to Collingwood in the second Semi Final, the Navy Blues destroyed St Kilda by 62 points in the Preliminary Final, and earned another shot at the Magpies in the decider. But one of Carlton’s problems was that Goold had been kicked on a shin against St Kilda, causing a burst blood vessel and serious swelling. Despite the best efforts of the club medical staff, Ragsy had only a slim chance of playing in the Grand Final right up until game day, when his worried coach reluctantly allowed him to take his place in the side. Later, Barassi justified his decision by saying that in his opinion, a less than fully fit Goold was still worth his place in the team. By half time in the Grand Final however, he was probably questioning that judgement - because Carlton had been totally outplayed, and trailed an impressive, cohesive Collingwood by 44 points. Therefore, Carlton’s magnificent comeback – orchestrated by Barassi, and sparked by the fairytale exploits of 19th man Ted Hopkins – is one of the greatest of all football stories. Against enormous odds, the Navy Blues fought their way back into the contest, and eventually, rolled over the top of the frantic Magpies to snatch victory by 10 points in the last few minutes of the match. Hopkins ended up with four goals, Barassi was hailed a genius, and Ragsy Goold was carted off to hospital immediately after the game to have further urgent treatment. While there, he decided that there was no better time to end his VFL career – especially because his burgeoning business interests were demanding more and more of his time. In the years after his football career ended, John Goold created a remarkably successful business empire. In 1971 he sold his fashion label and took up farming at Mortlake in western Victoria, where he coached the local football team for three seasons. Later, he formed a diversified pastoral company, and purchased a magnificent complex called Ballangeich Run at nearby Ellerslie. While his passion for farming and livestock grew, he began breeding top quality polo ponies, and represented Australia in international competition. During the 1997 and 1998 seasons, John's son Ed Goold played reserve grade football for Carlton. MEMORIES.... Ragsy Goold; the name stirs memories form my long ago childhood. Ragsy, with his unique kicking style, where he'd hold the ball (always a drop punt - in a time when the drop kick and the torpedo punt still reigned supreme) at the point of the ball, elbows bent and he'd lavishly drop the ball, his right arm then flinging back and up dramatically. That was the thing about Ragsy (so named because he worked in the clothing, or 'rag' trade), he was always dramatic. He always ensured his ankle guards and wrist guard were glowing white to match the great white CFC monogram he wore proudly on his chest, and with his long flowing locks, cut a dynamic figure through a young boy's mind. Ragsy was my idol. I loved his dashes from half back, his long accurate drop punts, most of all I loved his flair for the game. Ragsy played the game as an entertainer as well as a sportsman - he leapt high to punch or mark, and always seemed to have a bit of the thoroughbred about him - which is probably why after he retired, he took up fox chasing, polo, and riding his beloved thoroughbreds across the paddocks and over the fences of his property, I think he may have even represented Australia at the sport – really, that’s sort of how he played as a footballer. All sinewy muscle, long legs and famous leaps for the saving punch. Ragsy was part of the great backline that helped revive Carlton's fortunes. Legendary players Wes Lofts, Ian Collins, Kevin 'Racehorse' Hall, Vinnie Waite among them. All great teams have a great defence and the defence that Ragsy was an integral part of was no different. Where others provided the biffo, the muscle or the defensive pressure, Ragsy provided the dash, the flair, the sense of adventure that all great backlines must have. AND MORE.... I have had many favourite players while following the Blues, but there will always be a special spot for Ragsy Goold - running the lines, all long hair and flashing white guards. As a young man I moved to Carlton and began acting in a place called one-c-one. One night after a play, I was walking home. It was winter, and I was wearing my favouritte overcoat, a genuine ankle length tweed affair I had picked up in an Op Shop in Oakleigh for three dollars. As I strutted across Lygon Street, a deep male voice behind me called, 'hey laddie, how much for the overcoat?' I turned, and there was my childhood idol, Ragsy Goold, two beautiful women in tow, smiling and waiting for my answer. I loved that coat too much to part with it, even to Ragsy, so I shook my head - and he smiled, then walked off. I stood for a moment in the middle of the street shaking my head in disbelief. Ragsy bloody Goold had just offered to buy my overcoat! I knew at that point, as a young man of about twenty three, that life was going to be full of surprises and very entertaining - a bit like John ‘Ragsy’ Goold. ONE MORE.... A cold, wet day in the mid 1960's at the MCG and Victoria were playing South Australia (?) The ball that day was like a piece of soap, with players finding it impossible to mark. Just before half time a long kick sailed toward the mud heap that was the centre of the ground, and the pack rose to meet it. From this group of players an arm shot straight up, and the ball instantly came to a dead stop. The footy stuck in the player's palm as if the hand was coated in Tarzan's Grip. After all these years, it's the only recollection I have of that match, and that player was 'Mr. Elegance' John Goold. HUMOROUS HUNGRY.... Former opponent Richmond's Kevin Bartlett on Radio SEN in 2012 received a phone call from John. After the call Kevin told his listeners how "Mr Elegance" would always be dressed in a nice suit, shirt-tie and highly polished shoes. He then cracked a joke saying something like; "You know, John was so 'posh' that he used to play football wearing a cravat!" Milestones 50 Games: Round 15, 1967 vs Melbourne 100 Games: Round 13, 1970 vs Geelong Career Highlights 1965 - Percy Bentley Trophy - 3rd Best & Fairest 1966 - 5th Best & Fairest 1967 - Maurie Sankey Memorial Trophy - 4th Best & Fairest (on count back) 1968 - Premiership Player 1970 - 7th Best & Fairest 1970 - Premiership Player

Paperback Book - Diesel The Greg Williams Story

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

199 Paperback Book

Historical information

Autobiography of Greg Williams played for three AFL clubs after famously being rejected by Carlton twice.

Significance

Greg Williams played for three AFL clubs after famously being rejected by Carlton twice. Greg played for Geelong, Sydney & ironically Carlton. Greg won two Brownlow Medals at Sydney and Carlton in 1994. Greg played in the 1995 Premiership win over Geelong playing as forward kicking 5 goals. He was acknowledged for his handball skills and despite a lack of leg speed his ability to collect possessions.