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Carlton Football Club Carlton North, Victoria

The Carlton Football Club, founded in 1864, is the third oldest of the Victorian-based league clubs and in 1897 became a foundation member of the VFL (now AFL). It has been victorious in more Grand Finals than any other club in League history.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 83 Carlton North Victoria 3054
phone
+61 9389 6200; (03) 9387 1400

Contact

Location

Ikon Park 400 Royal Parade Carlton North Victoria

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A4 Letter - Letter to Roger Skien from Stephen Gough 1985

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

Thank you letter addressed to Roger Skien for his services during the 1985 season from Football Manager Stephen Gough.

Significance

A letter thanking a stalwart of the club Roger Skien

A4 Letter - Letter to Roger Skien from Stephen Gough Football Manager

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

Thank you letter to Roger Skien for his services during the 1984 season from Stephen Gough

A4 Letter - Letter to Roger Skien from Stephen Gough - 1987

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

typed A4 letter

Historical information

Thank you letter addressed to Roger Skien for his services during the 1987 season, from football manager Stephen Gough. Carlton won both the senior and reserve grade premierships in 1987.

A4 Letter - Letter to Roger Skien from Stephen Gough - 1990

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

typed A4 letter

Historical information

Thank you letter addressed to Roger Skien for his services during the 1990 season, from football manager Stephen Walsh.

A4 Letter - Letter to Roger Skien from Geoff Walsh - 1993

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

typed A4 letter

Historical information

Thank you letter addressed to Roger Skien for his services during the 1993 season, from football manager Geoff Walsh.

A4 Letter - Letter to Ian Collins from Roger Skien - 1984

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

typed A4 sized letter

Historical information

Letter addressed to to General Manager Ian Collins from Roger Skien, seeking approval to hold a pre-season dinner for the 1984 under-19's team to be held on the 22nd of March 1984

Black & White Photo - Carlton Football Club Premiers 1947 Ern Henfry Captain

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

An antique coloured photograph mounted on beige coloured cardboard

Historical information

Picture of Carlton's Captain of the 1947 Premiership Team

Significance

The photograph is of Ern Henfry Captain of Carlton FC who played in the 1947 GF against Essendon. Carlton famously won the game by one point. Fred Stafford snapped a miraculous goal from the boundary in the dying minutes. The game was played at the MCG 27th September 1947 Att 85793. Carlton 13.8 (86) def Essendon 11.19 (85). Ern Henfry Captain Perce Bentley Coach

Black & White Photo

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White Photo.

Historical information

A group photo of five Carlton Players from the mid 60s

Significance

The photo probably a press photograph shows five Carlton players four of which are making fun of Carlton great John Nicholls on a treatment table. The four players L-R Sergio Silvagni, Adrian Gallagher, Wes Lofts (dec) & Ron Stone. The photo indicates the then treatment rooms to the contemporary (2019) rooms. All the players played a significant role in the rise of Carlton in the 1960s.

Black & White Photo - Picture of John Lloyd

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White Photo

Historical information

Picture of Carlton Player John Lloys

Significance

The picture is of Carlton Player John Lloyd who played 29 games for Carlton from 1965-1967. John is player #773. John's three sons Matthew, Simon & Brad all worked or played football in various roles within the VFL. Matthew was unable to play for Carlton as his father did not play enough games to be eligible under the Father/Son rule. Matthew played for Essendon as a champion full forward. John's son Brad to date (2019) is Carlton's Football Manager.

Inscriptions & Markings

Date 2/5/67 on back of photo, name John Lloyd

Black & White Photo - The Blue Birds

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White Photo

Historical information

Carlton's Cheerleaders sponsored by Dr Geoff Edelsten

Significance

A short lived but significant episode in Carlton FC history, they formed a guard of honour for the players and performed a dance routine. It was Carlton's contribution to bring glitz & glam to the game experience.

Black & White Photos - Bruce Doull

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White photos

Historical information

Photographs of Bruce Doull

Significance

Group pf photos of Carlton Player Bruce Doull Career : 1969 - 1986 Debut : Round 5, 1969 vs South Melbourne, aged 18 years, 234 days Carlton Player No. 811 Games : 356 Goals : 22 Last Game : Grand Final, 1986 vs Hawthorn, aged 36 years, 16 days Guernsey Nos. 4 (1969-71) and 11 (1972-86) Height : 185 cm (6 ft. 1 in.) Weight : 87 kg (13 stone, 10 lbs.) DOB : 11 September, 1950 Premiership Player: 1972, 1979, 1981, 1982 Best and Fairest: 1974, 1977, 1980, 1984 Norm Smith Medal 1981 Carlton Hall of Fame (1987) Team of the Century Half Back Flank AFL Team of the Century Half Back Flank Carlton Legend By any measure, Bruce Doull was a champion. One the greatest defenders ever to have played the Australian code of football, he racked up a club record 352 matches for the Navy Blues (including six Grand Finals for four flags) in a 17-year career that stretched from 1969 to 1986. He was Carlton’s Best and Fairest four times, and a member of both the AFL and Carlton’s Team of the Century. It’s a curious fact, however, that we know comparatively little about him. An intensely private person, Bruce shunned publicity and rarely gave interviews. Instead, he let his football do the talking - by taking on and beating the best forwards in the game, week after week. Born Alexander Bruce Doull in Geelong in 1950, he was recruited by Carlton’s Under-19 squad in 1968 from the Jacana Football Club in Melbourne’s northern suburbs. In those early days he was a ruck-rover or half-forward, with a conservative haircut and a burning ambition to be a League footballer. The Blues were the reigning premiers, and the club’s roster was rich in talent across all three grades. Even so, Bruce played only a handful of games with the Under-19 squad (in guernsey number 53) before he was promoted to the Reserves and allocated the highly-prestigious number 4. Then, in only his second season at Princes Park, the shy youngster was selected to make his senior debut for Carlton in a home-ground match against South Melbourne in round 5, 1969. He sat on the reserves bench throughout the first half that afternoon, before being called on to replace the injured Alex Jesaulenko at half-time. Once on the field, Bruce made the occasion even more memorable by kicking his first career goal early in the third quarter, and Carlton held off the fast-finishing Swans to win by 25 points. Throughout 1969-70, Doull played another 14 matches as a winger, ruck-rover or half-forward. He was overlooked for a finals berth in both seasons, but mid-way through 1971, senior coach Ron Barassi told him that there was a regular spot available in defence if he wanted it bad enough, which Bruce certainly did. Given an opportunity to impress at half-back, his judgement, deceptive pace and strength in the air stood out, as did his remarkable poise and calmness under pressure. At 185 cm and 87 kg, Doull was no giant. Yet he soon demonstrated a remarkable ability to "play tall" in a key defensive role. And when the ball came to ground, he stayed in the contest because he never lost his concentration. His all-round agility was exceptional - making him equally as effective in a pocket or on a flank - and physical pressure rarely unsettled him.show_image.php?id=34774 In his 53rd senior appearance for Carlton - the 1972 VFL Grand Final - Doull stamped himself as a rising League star by subduing Richmond’s champion centre half-forward Royce Hart on the biggest stage of all. The Tigers kicked a huge 22.18 that afternoon, but Carlton booted 28.9 in the highest aggregate decider ever played, and collected an eleventh VFL Premiership. Hart was kept to just a handful of possessions and two goals for the match, so the media was soon clamouring for information about the Tiger star’s conqueror. Bruce complied, but he was uneasy in the spotlight and from then on was rarely available. At the same time, Doull had become the latest folk hero at Princes Park. Supporters loved his no-nonsense approach, his courage and his consistency. In keeping with his shy nature is the story of his playing numbers. More and more during his first three seasons in number 4, he was uncomfortable in the locker room because of the attention that was focused on him, in the presence of some of the club’s modern greats like Serge Silvagni (number 1), John Nicholls (2), Kevin Hall (3), Syd Jackson (5) and Garry Crane (6). Therefore, at the conclusion of the 1971 season he was granted a request to switch to guernsey number 11, which had become available due to the retirement of another idolised Carlton defender in John “Ragsy” Goold. With his new number, Bruce shifted only a few metres down the line of lockers, but for him, anywhere further from the limelight was appreciated. By his mid-twenties, Doull was sporting lavish sideboards and hair to his shoulders, which contrasted somewhat with his shy nature, and made him hard to mistake on the field. He won Carlton's Best and Fairest award in 1974, and followed up again in 1977, 1980 and 1984. In 1979 he collected his second Premiership medal when the Navy Blues knocked over Collingwood in a hard-fought, controversial Grand Final remembered for Wayne Harmes’ brilliant solo effort to seal the match. Two years later, Bruce’s finest hour arrived when the Blueboys broke myriads of Magpie hearts again to win the 1981 Grand Final by 20 points. Impassable all day at centre half-back, Doull beat four opponents, and was a worthy winner of the Norm Smith medal as Best on Ground. Twelve months on from that triumph, Bruce collected his fourth Premiership medal when the wounded Blues upset their other traditional rival, Richmond, for the '82 flag. By then nicknamed the “Flying Doormat” by TV commentator Lou Richards - in deference to his balding pate, shaggy beard and hair, kept under control by a navy blue or white headband - Doull led a Carlton defence that was rock-solid in the Blues' 18 point win. Although he would not have been overly concerned, plenty of good judges were gobsmacked afterwards when Bruce missed out on his second Norm Smith medal, which went instead to Richmond's Maurice Rioli. From 1976 to 1981, Bruce was a fixture in the Victorian State team, and earned a recall in 1984 at the age of 33. He was a remarkably durable and suffered a debilitating injury only once in his career, in 1985 – shortly after he had set a new games record at Carlton of 329 matches to succeed John Nicholls. He wrenched a knee at training a few days later, and ended up playing only three senior games for the season. Eventually, Doull made 356 appearances for Carlton, including 162 in succession to set another club record. He was never reported by the umpires for foul play, and widely respected for his fairness in playing the ball rather than the man. A former team-mate, Brent Crosswell once wrote: "Doull's game has a moral purity about it, and that is why opponents have always found it extremely difficult to be unfair to him. It would have shamed them." Carlton Coach of the Century David Parkin was equally as complimentary when he described Bruce as “the best team player I ever coached.” Doull’s final game for Carlton came in the sixth Grand Final of his career, when Hawthorn demolished the Blues in a one-sided 1986 decider. Star Hawks full-forward Jason Dunstall kicked six goals on the 36 year-old veteran in that match, but in the context of Bruce’s career as a whole, it was barely a blemish. He may have been a shy and reserved individual in public, but when Bruce Doull pulled on the famous Old Dark Navy Blue, he became one of the true legends of VFL/AFL football. Just one year after his retirement, Bruce was elected to the Carlton Hall of Fame. In September 1996 he was named on a half-back flank in the AFL Team of the 20th Century, and in 2000 filled the same spot in Carlton's Team of the Century. Then, in June 2014, during celebrations marking Carlton's 150th year of VFL/AFL competition, Bruce was named as one of the five greatest Blues of all time, alongside John Nicholls, Stephen Kernahan, Alex Jesaulenko and Stephen Silvagni. Footnotes On the way to victory in the 1982 Grand Final against Richmond, Doull was involved in a celebrated incident that stopped the game and both amused and infuriated the 107,536 fans at the ground. During a tense third quarter, Carlton was in front by one point when a naked female dashed out into the middle of the MCG. Wearing nothing but a Blues scarf, 18 year-old Helen D’Amico made a bee-line for Doull, and tried to embrace him before she was intercepted by his team-mate Wayne Johnston and disturbed match officials. With the crowd in uproar, she was bundled into an over-sized cardigan and marched off the ground, as Carlton went on to upset the Tigers by 18 points. It later emerged that Ms D’Amico had been working as a strip-tease artist at an Adelaide nightclub, and her streak was a publicity stunt. Milestones 50 Games: Semi Final, 1972 vs Richmond 100 Games: Round 22, 1974 vs St Kilda 150 Games: Round 3, 1977 vs St Kilda 200 Games: Round 14, 1979 vs Fitzroy 250 Games: Round 18, 1981 vs Geelong 300 Games: Round 19, 1983 vs St Kilda 350 Games: Round 19, 1986 vs Collingwood Career Highlights 1972 - 5th Best & Fairest 1972 - Premiership Player 1973 - 8th Best & Fairest 1974 - Robert Reynolds Memorial Trophy - Best & Fairest Award 1975 - Arthur Reyment Memorial Trophy - 2nd Best & Fairest 1976 - Arthur Reyment Memorial Trophy - 2nd Best & Fairest 1977 - Robert Reynolds Memorial Trophy - Best & Fairest Award 1979 - 7th Best & Fairest 1979 - Premiership Player 1980 - Robert Reynolds Memorial Trophy - Best & Fairest Award 1981 - 4th Best & Fairest 1981 - Norm Smith Medal 1981 - Premiership Player 1982 - 5th Best & Fairest 1982 - Premiership Player 1983 - 2nd Best & Fairest 1984 - Robert Reynolds Memorial Trophy - Best & Fairest Award 1984 - Best Clubman Award Links Articles: Bruce Doull Speaks | Yesowooloonko - You Beauty! | Moving Guernsey Numbers - UP! | Carlton's Magnificent Seven Footage Interview after the 1981 Grand Final: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzAqqk2u6y0 Toyota Bruce Doull Advertisement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk_yu4t8vYQ Driving with Sam Pang: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNwUaqVYBDo Bruce Doull vs Glenn Archer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVmHGMLFVqg Blueseum: Playing Career of Bruce Doull | Carlton Legends | Career Breakdown | Doull's Blueseum Image Gallery Video 1972 1973 1976 1977-79 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 Interview

Black & White Photos - Player's Revue Brunswick Town Hall 1947

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Two Black & White photos with an accompanying letter of origin

Historical information

Photos of Carlton's 1947 players performing a revue at the Brunswick Town Hall.

Significance

The photos depict Carlton players in season performing a ballet at a Carlton social function at the Brunswick Town Hall. Most of the players would represent Carlton in the winning 1947 Grand Final. The players were trained by a professional ballet teacher Mrs Clausen. Compared with current (2019) club social events the revue would be frowned upon due to the risk of injury. The accompanying letter is to Stephen probably Stephen Williamson, Carlton Statistician.

Black & White Photos x 2 - John O'Connell

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

2 x Black & White Photos

Historical information

Two Pictures of 1972 Premiership Player John O'Connell

Significance

Career : 1970 - 1976 Debut : Round 3, 1970 vs Richmond, aged 18 years, 361 days Carlton Player No. 818 Games : 111 Goals : 0 Guernsey Nos. 50 (1970-71) and No. 19 (1972-76) Last Game : Preliminary Final, 1976 vs North Melbourne, aged 25 years, 149 days Height : 183 cm (6 ft. 0 in.) Weight : 82 kg (12 stone, 13 lbs.) DOB : April 22, 1951 Premiership Player 1972 After starting his career at Carlton as a centreman or ruck-rover at Under-19 and Reserves level, John Michael “Jack” O’Connell found his niche in defence for the Blues and was a creative back pocket in Carlton’s record-breaking 1972 Grand Final victory over Richmond. A dasher who loved to take off on bouncing runs, Jack spent much of his career alongside champion full-back Geoff Southby, with either Vin Waite or David McKay in the opposite pocket. Together, they created a full-back line regarded as among the best in club history. O’Connell’s journey to Premiership glory began during his school days at St Mark’s in Melbourne’s outer north, then at Glenroy YCW and Fawkner. In 1967, aged 17, he joined Carlton’s Under-19s, and by midway through 1969 he was playing Reserves football in guernsey number 50. Early in the following year, a couple of strong showings saw him banging on the door of senior selection, and he was duly rewarded by being named on the bench for his senior debut against Richmond at the MCG in round 3, 1970. For the Blues and their supporters, the game was a forgettable one, because Carlton surrendered a big half-time lead to be beaten by 13 points, and O’Connell wasn’t called on until the dying minutes. Sent back to the Reserves after that one brief taste if the big time, Jack honed his skills and bided his time - for more than a year – while Carlton went on to win the 1970 Premiership. Eventually, he earned a recall midway through 1971, but with a bevy of stars standing in his way, he was a regular reserve until late in the year, when coach John Nicholls – aware that incumbent Ian Collins intended to retire – offered O’Connell a chance in the back pocket. Jack grasped his opportunity with both hands. At 183 cm and 82 kg he was bigger than the average specialist back-pocket of that era, but he gave nothing away in agility. An excellent mark and an accurate kick off either foot, he had settled in beside Southby by the end of that season, playing the last ten games straight. As season 1972 dawned and Collins retired, O'Connell inherited the Blues’ number 19 guernsey and began marking his mark in the Carlton defence. Inspired by Southby’s creativity and Waite’s aggression, Jack was soon a headache for every opposition club. An ankle injury sustained in round 5, 1972 against Collingwood cost him five matches, but he was back to top form by finals time, when Carlton finished the regular season on top of the ladder. In their first final together – the Second Semi Final - O’Connell, Southby and Waite were resolute in a thrilling draw. Richmond won the replay, then Carlton conquered St Kilda in the Preliminary Final to earn another crack at the Tigers in the Grand Final. Opting for a strategy of all-out attack in the flag decider, the Blues blasted off the blocks to kick 8 goals in the first quarter, 10 in the second and 7 in the third to put the game right out of Richmond’s grasp with a full quarter remaining. After coasting to the final siren, the Blues collected their eleventh VFL Premiership by 27 points. Waite was missing from the match, having been injured in the Preliminary Final, but David McKay was a more than adequate replacement, and all three defenders on the last line completed an excellent final series. On the way to another consistent season in 1973, O’Connell strained a thigh in Carlton’s surprise loss to Fitzroy at the Junction Oval in round 16, and wasn’t recalled to the senior side until the Grand Final, when Carlton and Richmond met once more in the 48th match of Jack’s career. A few days beforehand, Barry Armstrong had been ruled out when he was hit by appendicitis, so O’Connell took over Armstrong’s assigned role of negating the Tigers’ star centreman Ian Stewart. Jack stuck to his task all match, but neither he nor his team could hold back a ferocious Richmond side that crashed and bashed its way to victory. O’Connell went on to play in two more finals campaigns in 1975 and ’76 but was denied the joy of another September victory. He brought up game number 100 at Princes Park in June 1976, when Carlton ended a five-game losing sequence to beat Essendon, before calling time on his VFL career after the Blues suffered a heart-breaking 1-point loss to North Melbourne in that season’s Preliminary Final. In 1977 O'Connell was cleared to WAFL club Subiaco. Later he came back to Victoria and coached Diamond Creek to a Premiership in the Diamond Valley League. Then in 1987, the football world was rocked by the news that Jack had been diagnosed with a virulent form of cancer. He fought hard for 18 months, but tragically passed away on the 5th November, 1989 aged just 38. Career Highlights 1971 - 3rd Reserves Best & Fairest 1971 - Reserves Most Improved Player 1972 - Premiership Player Milestones 50 Games : Round 2, 1974 vs Geelong 100 Games :Round 13, 1976 vs Essendon Footnotes Off the field, O’Connell was a quiet, reserved character who, by 1973 had struck a warm friendship with another man of few words in his champion team-mate Bruce Doull. The pair could often be seen together sharing a beer after Sunday morning recovery sessions, and club folklore has it that the only regular conversation to be heard between them was, “it’s your shout.” In 1997, John's son Luke O'Connell joined Carlton, playing eight Reserves games and kicking three goals.

Inscriptions & Markings

The Sun Articles pasted on back of each photo

Black & White Team Photo - Carlton Football Club VFL Premiers 1945

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White team photo mounted on larger piece of beige coloured carboard

Historical information

Photograph of 1945 Carlton Premiership Team

Significance

The picture is of Carlton's winning Premiership team of 1945.Carlton defeated South Melbourne played at Princes Park (The MCG was unavailable due to WW2 use).Carlton 15.13 (103) def South Melbourne 10.15 (75). Att 62986. Carlton's Captain was Bob Chitty & Coach was Perce Bentley. The game itself is better known as " The Bloodbath" due to violent nature. Ten Players were reported with South Melbourne player Ted Whitfield receiving the biggest penalty a 21 match ban, he attempted to strike the field umpire.

Black & White Team Photo - Carlton Football Club Premiers VFL 1947

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White Photograph attached to larger piece of beige cardboard.

Historical information

Official 1947 Premiership Photograph

Significance

The team photograph represents the players who played in the 1947 GF against Essendon. Carlton famously won the game by one point. Fred Stafford snapped a miraculous goal from the boundary in the dying minutes. The game was played at the MCG 27th September 1947 Att 85793. Carlton 13.8 (86) def Essendon 11.19 (85). Ern Henfry Captain Perce Bentley Coach

Black & White Team Photo - Under 19 Premiers 1963

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Black & White photo mounted on cardboard

Historical information

Black & Team photo of Under 19 1963 team photo

Significance

A Carlton U19 Premiership in 1963 contained triple Carlton Premiership player (1968, 70, 72) Adrian "Gags" Gallagher. Carlton 4.2 26 6.3 39 10.8 68 12.11 83 Essendon 0.1 1 4.3 27 4.6 30 6.9 45 The game was played at Bacchus Marsh. This match was played at Maddingley Oval, Bacchus Marsh as it was the only venue that was not being used for cricket. It was staged later than scheduled because of an earlier drawn final.

Black & White Team Photo - 1918 Team Players only

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

A black & white photo mounted on cardboard

Historical information

1918 Team Photo. .

Significance

A players only photo of the 1918 team. Unfortunately the players aren't named.The worst years of World War I had finished by the start of the 1918 season, and Essendon and St Kilda were able to again field teams. Melbourne were still missing from the competition, but World War I would end in 1918 and they would rejoin in 1919. Carlton again made the final 4 but would lose to South Melbourne in a close second Semi Final by 5 points. The Blues were eventually ranked third, with their failure to make it through Grand Final was a mirror performance of 1917. Coach: Norman Clark Captain: Rod McGregor Leading Goal-kicker: Ern Cowley - 35 goals. Cowley also kicked the most goals for the competition in 1918.

Black & White Team Photo - Carlton's Football Team 54 years ago (1870)

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Replica of Black & White photo taken 1870

Historical information

Carlton's Football Team 54 years ago (1870)

Significance

The photograph was taken in 1870 in Royal Park near the point Burke & Wills party left in 1840. Significant people in the group; Ben James Carlton's first secretary & Jack Conway.

Black & White Team Photo - 1951 GF Reserves Winning Team

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Metal & Plastic photo with stand

Historical information

Picture of 1951 Reserves Premiership team

Significance

First Carlton Reserves Premiership since 1928. Carlton 2.5 17 4.8 32 8.13 61 8.15 63 Essendon 0.3 3 2.6 18 3.7 25 7.9 51 George Ferry (5), Doug Guy (1), Bill Milroy (1) and Johnny Blake (1). Best: Doug Beasy, George Stafford, Ken Aitken, Harry Dern, George Ferry and Bill Milroy. Carlton Reserves Player's Guernsey Numbers (Football Record, Preliminary Final) 1. Ken Aitken (Captain), 2. Bill Huntington, 3. Johnny Blake, 4. Doug Guy, 5. Morrie Williams, 6, Gerald Burke, 7. Jack Hedley, 8. N. Lee, 9. J. Ryan, 10. Keith Batchelor, 11. A. Max Thomas, 12, Doug Williams, 13. Harry Dern, 14. Adam Inglis, 15. Harvey Dunn jnr, 16. G. Neal, 17. Doug Beasy, 18. Alan Thynne, 19. Don Calder (Vice Captain), 20-28 not allocated, 29. Bill Milroy, 30. George Stafford, 31. not allocated, 32. Brian Molony, 33. G. Hunter, 34. Bernie Baxter, 35. G. Rich, 36. Tom Jones, 37. Ron Price, 38. Frank Bateman, 39. George Ferry, 40. Dick Gill.

Black & White Team Photo

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Postcard size Black & White photo

Historical information

Picture of Carlton's Premiership Team & Coach Ron Barassi. Back row: Gordon Casey, Barry Gill, Neil Chandler, Bill Bennett, Adrian Gallagher, Denis Munari. 2nd row: Ron Auchettl, Ian Robertson, Bryan Quirk, Peter Smith, Bob Edmond, Brian Kekovich, Brent Crosswell. 3rd Row: Gary Crane, Ron Stone, Vin Waite, Peter Jones, Robert Walls, Peter McLean, Alex Jesaulenko, Ian Nicoll. Seated: Ian Collins, John Goold, John Nicholls (captain), Ron Barassi (coach), Wes Lofts, Sergio Silvagni, Kevin Hall.

Significance

Carlton FC's first premiership after 21 years, at the time the longest drought premiership in the club's history. The win was the culmination of recruiting Ron Barassi from Melbourne FC in 1965. Ron Barassi leaving Melbourne at the end of the 1964 season was one of the most sensational stories in VFL history. Carlton defeated Essendon 7.14 (56) to 8.5 (53) Att 115828. The game was marred by a blustery wind. Brian Kekovich kicked 4 goals for Carlton and Gary Crane was Carlton's best player.

Book - The Carlton Story

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Hardback Decent condition book

Historical information

The Carlton Story is a hardback book written by Hugh Buggy and Harry Bell. It's talks about the proud history of the Carlton Football Club, as well as outlines some significant moments from the early Carlton days, such as some team photos before games in the late 1800's, as well as images of the 1906, '07 and '08 premiership teams.

Brochure - The Blues Seat For Life Program - Brochure

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

small coloured brochure

Historical information

Brochure advertising "The Blues Seat For Life Program" prior to the 1996 season and the opening of the new Eastern End Stand at Princes Park. This program gave members first opportunity to renew their reserved seat for following seasons.

Brown Covered Excercise Scrap Book - 1956 Carlton

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Brown Covered Exercise Book

Historical information

1956 Season depicted by a collection of newspaper articles and personal entries

Significance

A collection of newspaper articles depicting Carlton's 1956 season in an Olympic Year for Melbourne. 1956 Summary After losses in the first two rounds to Essendon and Melbourne (two of the 1955 finalists), Carlton managed to win 6 games in a row between rounds 3 and 8. The Blues would have won 8 in a row if not for a 1 point loss to Geelong in round 9. After round 10, the Blues sat fourth on the ladder, with a game in hand over fifth place. Our strong mid-season form deserted us, and the club could only manage a 3 win, 1 draw and 4 loss record in its last 8 games. Going into the last game of the season, the Blues still clung onto 4th place on the ladder, half a game in front of Footscray. With the last game of the season being the Dogs at Princes Park, the Blues had a strong chance of playing finals football. Unfortunately, Footscray narrowly outscored Carlton in every quarter, resulting in a 17 point win and leapfrogging the Blues for 4th spot. The season did point to the continued improvement in the club's playing fortunes, showing year-on-year improvement for the club since the low point of 1954. This improvement would continue in 1957, with the club making the finals for the first time since 1952.

Inscriptions & Markings

Olympic Symbol & Carlton Emblem both on front cover

Cassette tape - Rebirth of the Blues, 1991. How Blue are you?

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Audio cassette

Historical information

"We need your support to recapture the spirit of the good old days. Carlton Football Club Membership songs" Side A "How Blue Are You" Written and performed by Oscar Swarv. Guitar: Rob Manley Flute: Neil Jamieson Side B "Blue is our colour" - a singalong tune by members of your team. New Lyrics by Oscar Swarv. From Roger Skien Collection.

CFC U19 1986

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

CFC U19 Team List 1986

Significance

Includes two future Carlton Premiership Players Ian Aitken 1987 Fraser Brown 1995

CFC U19 Best & Fairest 1984 Votes

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

Vote Count 1984 U19 Peter Higgins 1984 Winner Shane Baldwin Runner Up David Zerna

Significance

Carlton Premiership Players Ian Aitken 1987 31 Votes Mil Hanna 1995 68 Votes

Coloured Record - North Melbourne vs Carlton 1999 Grand Final Record

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Historical information

1999 AFL Grand Final was a battle between two powerhouse Victorian squads in Carlton and North Melbourne. With North under the supervision of Dennis Pagan, and the elite kicking of Wayne Carey, the blues couldn't keep up with the Roos, and ended up losing 19-10-124, to 12-17-89.

Colour Magazine - Inside Carlton 1998 Yearbook

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Colour Magazine 52 Pages

Historical information

Annual post season CFC Magazine

Colour Magazine - Football Record

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

A colour magazine the AFL Grand Final 1995 v Geelong

Historical information

AFL Record 1995 Grand Final

Significance

For Carlton it was their 16th Premiership and to date (2019) their last. Carlton defeated Geelong 21.15 (141) to 11.14 (80). The match attendance was 93670. For Carlton the major goal kickers were Captain Stephen Kernahan 5. Greg Williams 5 & Brad Pearce 4. Carlton won 16 games in a row including the Grand Final and since it represented Carlton's 16th Premiership it was dubbed "Sweet Sixteen" Norm Smith medalist (best on ground) was Greg Williams. A significant contribution to the win was full back Stephen Silvagni holding Geelong's champion full forward to no goals.

Colour Magazine - THE RIVALRY

Carlton Football Club, Carlton North

Glossy Colour Magazine

Historical information

Until 1996 the complete history of the rivalry between Carlton & Collingwood

Significance

The production attempts successfully to trace the fierce rivalry between Carlton & Collingwood since the first match in 1892. There are various sections confined to Marks, Heroes Wild Ones & Stats. The publication contains many photos, articles and importantly vital statistics covering all aspects of between games Carlton & Collingwood. Every result for matches to 1996 are given.