Historical information

This apron was made by Theresa Dunn (néé Wallis) of Breakaway Creek, Victoria. Born in 1912, Theresa came from a farming family and left school at the age of 14 following the death of her mother to help care for her younger siblings. Well known for her needlework, Theresa and her sister Eileen exhibited widely and later judged work for Victorian and interstate needlework competitions. Sticklers for perfection, they were known to always look at the back of the work first. In 1935 Theresa married Allan Dunn. This apron formed part of her glory box; a collection of items saved in preparation for married life. Never used, it was donated to the Ballarat Apron Festival in 2017 by Theresa’s daughter.

Significance

Made by Theresa Dunn of Breakaway Creek in the 1930s, this apron reflects early-20th century ideals of thrift and resourcefulness that were highly regarded as desirable feminine traits. By making do and adapting waste materials, such as hessian sacks and fabric scraps, into practical clothing, women could demonstrate their sewing expertise and ingenuity; highly prized qualities during times of economic depression or frugalness. Part of Theresa's glory box, this apron is in immaculate condition and is an example of depression era clothing and resourcefulness.

Physical description

Sugar bag apron (circa 1930s) Ballarat Apron Festival collection Until the mid-20th century concepts of thrift and resourcefulness were highly regarded as desirable feminine traits. By making do and adapting waste materials, such as hessian sacks and fabric scraps, into practical clothing, women could demonstrate their sewing expertise and ingenuity; highly prized qualities during times of economic depression or frugalness.

Inscriptions & markings

Colonial Sugar Refining Co Ltd. Pure Cane Sugar 70lbs. Melbourne 1A