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Document - Copy of address to schools at ANZAC Eve Commemoration at Shrine of Remembrance in 1939 by Legatee President Eric Russell

From the Collection of Melbourne Legacy 293 Swanston Street Melbourne Victoria

Description
Text of a speech at the Annual Anzac Commemoration Service for Students in 1939, typed on foolscap size paper in black ink as well as the original palm cards that were typed on smaller squares of buff colour card. Plus two notes from Legatee Frank Doolan who gave the speech to the Archives committee.
Size
01179.1-7 130 x 115 mm, 7 cards : 01179.8-11 335 x 217 mm, 3 pages : 01179.12 135 x 87 mm : 01179.13 205 x 75 mm
Object Registration
01179
Keywords
anzac commemoration for students, wreath laying ceremony
Historical information
A copy of an Anzac Day Address at the Anzac Commemoration Ceremony for Students in 1939, given by the Eric Russell, President of Legacy. It was stored with documents about the building of the Shrine and another speech from a students' service. Legatee Russell had served in World War 1 so was very close to the events he was talking about.
The ceremony provides a valuable opportunity for students to gain an appreciation of the Anzac spirit, the significance of the Shrine and the meaning of Anzac Day.
The ceremony is usually attended by representatives from schools throughout the state and the Governor of Victoria.
The text says: 'Over twenty years have passed since the events that we are commemorating today took place. As time goes on, our memory of incidents grows dimmer, but our understanding of the whole war and of the tremendous efforts that were made at Gallipoli grows clearer. Particularly do we realise, when we look back, that Australia grew to be a nation during those years of anxiety and endeavour, of which Gallipoli was for us the beginning. . . . "
When Made
1939
Significance
A record of a ceremony at the Shrine for school students. The text of the speech is significant in that it was written by a man who had served in World War 1 and knew first hand what it meant to be part of the first Anzacs.
Last updated
23 Apr 2019 at 3:47PM