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Australian Army Museum of Western Australia Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Western Australia

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia was formed in 1976 to tell the stories of the Army in Western Australia and Western Australians in the Army. Its collections cover the period from early European contact to the present

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Contact Information

location
Artillery Barracks Burt Street Fremantle Western Australia 6160
phone
+61 +61 8 9430 2535

Contact

Opening Hours

10:30 to 3 pm Wednesday through Sunday. Last entry 1pm.

Entry Fee

Adult $10, Child/Concession $7, Family $20

Location

Artillery Barracks Burt Street Fremantle, Western Australia 6160 Western Australia

The focus of the collection is to tell the story of the Australian Army in Western Australia and Western Australians in the Army. Galleries cover the period from initial contact through to the present. Collection items include large armoured vehicles and artillery pieces, weapons, uniforms, medals and personal equipment. The social history of military service and conflict is presented through diaries, oral histories, personal archives and personal objects. The collection includes connections to next of kin, bereavement, repatriation and commemoration.

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72 items

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

West Indian Troops with the Australian Gunners. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Diorama

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

1:1 scale diorama showing mounted trooper of 10th Australian Light Horse Regiment in Palestine 1918 and dismounted Ottoman soldier

Historical information

This diorama is the central feature in the World War 1 Gallery - Middle East Campaigns sequence and shows typical uniforms and accoutrements of the Australian Light Horse and Ottoman infantry.

Significance

This diorama attempts to convey the conditions experienced and the country traversed during "The Great Ride"

Diorama

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

1:1 scale diorama showing Australian patrol advancing up the Kokoda Track in light fighting order circa August 1942.

Historical information

This diorama is the central feature in the World War 2 Gallery - South West Pacific area. Soldiers are shown still wearing khaki uniforms including shorts. Details include helmet, .303 SMLE rifles, small pack and fighting order. Japanese "Woodpecker" machine gun is show abandoned beside the track.

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Busy scenes on the Wharf, Cape Town, South Africa Stereoscope #6 from a boxed set "For Queen and Flag: South Africa 1900" by Underwood and Underwood, Publishers

Inscriptions & Markings

Works and Studios: Arlington NJ; Littleton NH; Washington DC

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

General Hobbs August 1917 Blaringham, France. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Diorama

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

1:1 scale diorama showing soldier of Australian soldier of the 7th Division at the time of the advance into the Markham and Ramu Valleys, September 1943

Historical information

This diorama is the introductory feature in the World War 2 Gallery - New Guinea and Islands area. A private soldier is shown in mixture of green and khaki uniforms, US style long leggings, long trousers with Thompson and Owen guns.

Significance

The diorama shows the gradual introduction of green uniform elements and recognition of passive anti malaria measures (long sleeve and long pants)

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Horse Lines in Karrakatta Camp. Published in Australian Stereoscopic Views, WA Series, Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Historical information

The 1st Contingent departed Fremantle on 7 November 1899 and returned on 29 December 1900. The 2nd Contingent departed 3 February 1900 and returned 8 December 1900. Due to the shortage of khaki material, the 1st Contingent uniforms wore their blue militia tunics, blue puttees and a dark blue puggaree on departure. An Anglo Boer War Service of Reconciliation is held annually on the first Sunday in June at the "Fallen Soldiers" (Boer War) Memorial in Kings Park attended by descendants and representative of all combatant nations. The date selected is the closest Sunday to the date of signing of the Treaty or Peace of Vereeniging (31 May 1902). The culmination of the service is the laying of the Emily Hobhouse wreath.

Significance

Unique series of stereoscopic images showing both the 1st and 2nd West Australian Mounted Infantry Contingents to the Anglo Boer War. Images contain details of uniforms, accoutrements, camp life, civic honours and departure.

Inscriptions & Markings

Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

WA Transvaal Contingent in Camp at Karrakatta. Published in Australian Stereoscopic Views, WA Series, Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Historical information

The 1st Contingent departed Fremantle on 7 November 1899 and returned on 29 December 1900. The 2nd Contingent departed 3 February 1900 and returned 8 December 1900. Due to the shortage of khaki material, the 1st Contingent uniforms wore their blue militia tunics, blue puttees and a dark blue puggaree on departure. An Anglo Boer War Service of Reconciliation is held annually on the first Sunday in June at the "Fallen Soldiers" (Boer War) Memorial in Kings Park attended by descendants and representative of all combatant nations. The date selected is the closest Sunday to the date of signing of the Treaty or Peace of Vereeniging (31 May 1902). The culmination of the service is the laying of the Emily Hobhouse wreath.

Significance

Unique series of stereoscopic images showing both the 1st and 2nd West Australian Mounted Infantry Contingents to the Anglo Boer War. Images contain details of uniforms, accoutrements, camp life, civic honours and departure.

Inscriptions & Markings

Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

A pack mule carrying water. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Queen's Colour - 28th Battalion (The Swan Regiment)

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Union flag with gold fringes. In the centre the Arabic numeral "28" on a red background within a circle inscribed "TWENTY EIGHTH INFANTRY ", surmounted by the Crown. Emblazoned on the colour are the following Second World War Battle Honours:- DEFENCE OF TOBRUK, DEFENCE OF ALAMEIN LINE, QATTARA TRACK, EL ALAMEIN, LAE-NADZAB, BUSU RIVER, FINSCHHAFEN, SIKI COVE, BORNEO, LABUAN

Historical information

This former King's Colour was originally authorised by King George V in 1919 in recognition of services of 28th Battalion (AIF) during the Great War. Presented by HE the Governor General Sir Ronald Munro-Ferguson, PC, CGMG at a parade in King's Park on 2 October 1920 and handed over to 2nd Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment of the Citizen Forces. This colour was passed on to 28th Battalion, which was created, from other units in 1921. The colour was subsequently consecrated by the Chaplain General, Archbishop COL Riley, OBE, VD,DD at a parade on the Esplanade, Perth, 15 November 1924. At the time of presentation this colour was a plain union flag with no central devices or other distinctions included on it. Following Military Board approval given in 1925 the centre circle and Crown were later added, in accordance with the approved design for a King's Colour. With the re-activation of the Citizen Military Forces (CMF) following the Second World War, the 16th/28th Infantry Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia) was raised as a linked battalion in 1948 to carry on the identity and traditions of the pre-war 16th and 28th Battalions respectively. The King's and Regimental Colours formerly held by these two battalions were passed on to the new battalion who paraded them in rotation on ceremonial occasions. The above battalion became unlinked in March 1952 and 28th Infantry Battalion (The Swan Regiment) became an independent battalion within its own right. The former colours of 28th Battalion were handed back at a parade at Northam Camp on 24 August 1952. With the accession of HM Queen Elizabeth II to the throne in 1953, all Colours that had originally been presented as King's Colours, and were still carried by units on the current Order of Battle, were automatically deemed to be Queen's Colours. Under major reorganisation of the CMF in 1960, all individual infantry battalions that existed at the time within each State were amalgamated to form State regiments, taking effect from 1 July 1960. Thus from that date the 11/44th, 16th and 28th Infantry Battalions were amalgamated to form The Royal Western Australia Regiment. In September 1960, at a ceremonial parade held at Northam Camp, the Colours carried by all former battalions were handed over for safe keeping by the new regiment. Battle Honours for the Second World War were promulgated under Australian Army Order 135/1961 and the 10 selected honours approved for emblazoning on the Queen's Colour were subsequently added in 1962 These former colours were subsequently laid up in the undercroft at the State War Memorial, King's Park on 29 November 1964. These were transferred to the Army Museum of WA in 1988 as part of the Bicentenary Colours Project.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Last ride in Belgium, July 1914. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

A wireless signal tanks on what was "No Mans Land". Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Types of Chinese from a Labour Battalion working on the Australian Corps Front. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

19 March 1917. Band of 5th Australian Infantry Battalion marching through the streets of Bapaume, France. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Camouflaged artillery. Australians with their guns and limbers camouflaged with foliage. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Diorama

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

1:1 scale diorama showing a Lewis gunner of 44th Battalion, 11th Brigade, 3rd Division, Australian Imperial Force in May 1918

Historical information

This diorama is the introductory feature in the World War 1 Gallery - 1918 experience. The figure shows details of the Lewis gun and webbing including the documented but irregular positioning of the entrenching tool.

Significance

The diorama text discusses the transition from manpower to firepower with the restructure of infantry battalions to incorporate more light machine guns and to give the platoon an all round versus specialist capability. The increase in firepower and the reduction to three from four battalions in an infantry regiment in part offset the decline in voluntary recruitment. The offensive capabilities of an infantry battalion was therefore generally maintained but with 700 men instead of 1100 when fully manned .

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Western Front 1918. Boche prisoner assisting wounded British soldiers. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Significance

Provides conformation of policy that German POWs so employed retained their helmets and respirators,

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Richmond, Australia VAD Dorothy Hobbs (left), Richmond Military Hospital. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Regimental Colour - 16th Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Royal blue with gold and red fringes. In the centre the main device from the regimental badge consisting of a black swan upon a pair of crossed rifles on a red background, within a circle inscribed "THE ROYAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA REGIMENT". The whole enclosed within a wreath of Australian wattle and surmounted by the Crown. Across the lower portion of the wreath a scroll inscribed with the regimental motto "VIGILANT". In the upper canton the Roman numeral "XVI" (Originally this was the numeral "I" - changed to "XVI" in 1966 - see Historical Background details below) Battle honours emblazoned on the colour : SOUTH AFRICA 1899-1902, SOMME 1916-18, POZIERES, BULLECOURT, MESSINES 1917, YPRES 1917, PASSCHENDAELE, AMIENS, MONT ST QUENTIN, HINDENBURG LINE, LANDING AT ANZAC

Historical information

Presented to 1st Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment by Field Marshall HRH The Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh at a parade held at the Western Australian Cricket Association Ground, East Perth on 25 November 1962. The Royal Western Australia Regiment was formed on 1 July 1960 from the amalgamation of the following existing infantry battalions in the State at the time :- • 11th/44th Infantry Battalion (The City of Perth Regiment) • 16th Infantry Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia) • 28th Infantry Battalion (The Swan Regiment) At the above presentation of colours to the new battalion, the Colours of the former battalions (four sets of Queen's and Regimental colours) were trooped through the ranks of the battalion and marched off the parade for the last time. These former colours were subsequently laid up in the undercroft at the State War Memorial, King's Park on 29 November 1964. These were transferred to the Army Museum of WA in 1988 as part of the Bicentenary Colours Project. (Refer to Items 4-12 for individual records of these colours) 1st Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment was renumbered 16th Battalion effective from 1st January 1966 as part of a move to reintroduce the old battalion numbers back into the State Regimental system 16th Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment was presented with a new set of Colours on 27 October 2002. The original 1962 Colours were formally handed over for safe keeping to the Army Museum of Western Australia on 3 November 2002. Battle Honours allocated to the State Infantry Regiments created under the CMF reorganisation in July 1960 were promulgated in Australian Army Order 85/1962. These were a consolidation of the battle honours awarded to the various individual battalions that were amalgamated to form the new regiments.

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Edinburgh Castle - Gordon Highlanders before leaving for War in South Africa Stereoscope #1 from a boxed set "For Queen and Flag: South Africa 1900" by Underwood and Underwood, Publishers

Inscriptions & Markings

Works and Studios: Arlington NJ; Littleton NH; Washington DC

Queen's Colour - 16th Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Union flag with gold fringes. In the centre a circle inscribed "THE ROYAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA REGIMENT", surmounted by the Crown. Battle honours emblazoned on the colour : CAPTURE OF TOBRUK, DEFENCE OF TOBRUK, EL ALAMEIN, DAMOUR, BRALLOS PASS, KOKODA TRAIL, LAE-NADZAB, LIBERATION OF AUSTRALIAN NEW GUINEA, BORNEO, LABUAN

Historical information

Presented to 1st Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment by Field Marshall HRH The Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh at a parade held at the Western Australian Cricket Association Ground, East Perth on 25 November 1962. The Royal Western Australia Regiment was formed on 1 July 1960 from the amalgamation of all existing infantry battalions in the State at the time :- • 11th/44th Infantry Battalion (The City of Perth Regiment) • 16th Infantry Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia) • 28th Infantry Battalion (The Swan Regiment) At the above presentation of colours to the new battalion, the Colours of the former battalions (four sets of Queen's and Regimental colours) were trooped through the ranks of the battalion and marched off the parade for the last time. These former colours were subsequently laid up in the undercroft at the State War Memorial, King's Park on 29 November 1964. These were transferred to the Army Museum of WA in 1988 as part of the Bicentenary Colours Project. (Refer to Items 4-12 for individual records of these colours) 1st Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment was renumbered 16th Battalion effective from 1st January 1966 as part of a move to reintroduce the old battalion numbers back into the State Regimental system. 16th Battalion, The Royal Western Australia Regiment was presented with a new set of Colours on 27 October 2002. The original 1962 Colours were formally handed over for safe keeping to the Army Museum of Western Australia on 3 November 2002. Battle Honours allocated to the State Infantry Regiments created under the CMF reorganisation in July 1960 were promulgated in Australian Army Order 85/1962. These were a consolidation of the battle honours awarded to the various individual battalions that were amalgamated to form the new regiments.

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Balloon Corps ready to ascend for observation - Lord Roberts' Army - advancing on Pretoria S.A. Stereoscope #117 from a boxed set "For Queen and Flag: South Africa 1900" by Underwood and Underwood, Publishers

Inscriptions & Markings

Works and Studios: Arlington NJ; Littleton NH; Washington DC

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Marines of HMS "Niobe" cheering news from the front, Capetown, South Africa Stereoscope #3 from a boxed set "For Queen and Flag: South Africa 1900" by Underwood and Underwood, Publishers

Inscriptions & Markings

Works and Studios: Arlington NJ; Littleton NH; Washington DC

Queen's Colour - 16th Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia)

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Union flag with gold fringe. In the centre the Arabic numeral "16" on a red background within a circle inscribed "SIXTEENTH BATTALION", surmounted by the Crown. Emblazoned on the colour are the following Second World War Battle Honours:- NORTH AFICA 1941, SYRIAN FRONTIER, THE LITANI, SIDON, WADI ZEINI, DAMOUR, KOKODA TRAIL, BUNA-GONA, LIBERATION OF AUSTRALIAN NEW GUINEA, BORNEO

Historical information

With the re-activation of the Citizen Military Forces (CMF) following the Second World War, the 16th/28th Infantry Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia) was raised in 1948 to carry on the identity and traditions of the pre-war 16th and 28th Battalions respectively. The King's and Regimental Colours formerly held by these two battalions were passed on to the new battalion who paraded them in rotation on ceremonial occasions It was decided in 1950 that a new set of Colours would be presented to 16th Battalion. For reasons that still remain unclear, these were manufactured under local arrangement by "cannibalising" the original 1933 set of colours and transferring the devices and battle honours (in the case of the Regimental Colour) to the new Colours. (Reported by Western Command to the Adjutant General -reference file A 107/1/11 dated 30 April 1952). These new colours were presented by Major-General JS Whitelaw, CB, CBE at a parade of the 16th/28th Infantry Battalion held on the Esplanade, Perth, 26 August 1951. (For details of Colours previously presented to 16th Battalion see separate section below). 16th/28th Infantry Battalion became unlinked in March 1952 with both 16th and 28th becoming independent battalions within their own right. With the accession of HM Queen Elizabeth II to the throne in 1953, all Colours that had originally been presented as King's Colours, and were still carried by units on the current Order of Battle, were automatically deemed to be Queen's Colours. Under major reorganisation of the CMF in 1960, all individual infantry battalions that existed at the time within each State were amalgamated to form State regiments, taking effect from 1 July 1960. Thus from that date the 11/44th, 16th and 28th Infantry Battalions were amalgamated to form The Royal Western Australia Regiment. In September 1960, at a ceremonial parade held at Northam Camp, the Colours carried by all former battalions were handed over for safe keeping by the new regiment. Battle Honours for the Second World War were promulgated under Australian Army Order 135/1961 and the 10 selected honours approved for emblazoning on the Queen's Colour were subsequently added in 1962 These former colours were subsequently laid up in the undercroft at the State War Memorial, King's Park on 29 November 1964. These were transferred to the Army Museum of WA in 1988 as part of the Bicentenary Colours Project Previous Colours presented to 16th Battalion The designation "16th" was allocated to several different infantry battalions that had been raised at different stages during changes to organisational structure of the Citizen Forces during the 1920's and 1930's. The original King's Colour awarded for service of 16th Battalion (AIF) and received in 1920 by the Citizen Force unit 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment was later passed on to 16th Battalion (The Goldfields Regiment) which had been raised in the Kalgoorlie area in 1921. This unit became inactive and this Colour was later laid up in the Kalgoorlie Council Chambers. In order to maintain the identity of 16th Battalion as a Citizen Force unit, in 1930 11th Battalion (The Perth Regiment) was reformed as a linked battalion under the designation 11th/16th Battalion. As the 11th Battalion had already received its set of colours in the 1920's, it was decided that a set of King's and Regimental Colours be presented for 16th Battalion. These were presented by HE the Lieutenant-Governor Sir James Mitchell, KCMG at a parade of 11th/16th Battalion held at Perth Oval on 15 October 1933. The colours were consecrated by the Chaplain General, Archbishop COL Riley, OBE, VD, DD. In 1936 16th Battalion was re-established as a separate battalion within its own right, being formed as 16th Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia). The colours presented in 1933 were passed on to this new battalion and were also initially carried by the post-World War Two unit 16th/28th Infantry Battalion (The Cameron Highlanders of Western Australia) as already mentioned.

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Ground we won near Hannebeke. The result of effective British artillery fire. Boche dead in foreground. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Photographing the Officers. 2nd WA Contingent. Published in Australian Stereoscopic Views, WA Series, Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Historical information

The 1st Contingent departed Fremantle on 7 November 1899 and returned on 29 December 1900. The 2nd Contingent departed 3 February 1900 and returned 8 December 1900. Due to the shortage of khaki material, the 1st Contingent uniforms wore their blue militia tunics, blue puttees and a dark blue puggaree on departure. An Anglo Boer War Service of Reconciliation is held annually on the first Sunday in June at the "Fallen Soldiers" (Boer War) Memorial in Kings Park attended by descendants and representative of all combatant nations. The date selected is the closest Sunday to the date of signing of the Treaty or Peace of Vereeniging (31 May 1902). The culmination of the service is the laying of the Emily Hobhouse wreath.

Significance

Unique series of stereoscopic images showing both the 1st and 2nd West Australian Mounted Infantry Contingents to the Anglo Boer War. Images contain details of uniforms, accoutrements, camp life, civic honours and departure.

Inscriptions & Markings

Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Cape Town and its Harbour - the Metropolis and Sea-port of South Africa Stereoscope #4 from a boxed set "For Queen and Flag: South Africa 1900" by Underwood and Underwood, Publishers

Inscriptions & Markings

Works and Studios: Arlington NJ; Littleton NH; Washington DC

Photograph

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Remains of the German bomb stops where Lieut McCarthy gained the VC (the barricade has been altered somewhat by the weather when the photo was taken) looking N and showing the hole scooped by British soldiers under the block. Digital copy of photograph from a personal album of Lieutenant General JJT Hobbs.

Stereographic Image

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Have Some Dinner with Us. 2nd WA Contingent at Karrakatta. Published in Australian Stereoscopic Views, WA Series, Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Historical information

The 1st Contingent departed Fremantle on 7 November 1899 and returned on 29 December 1900. The 2nd Contingent departed 3 February 1900 and returned 8 December 1900. Due to the shortage of khaki material, the 1st Contingent uniforms wore their blue militia tunics, blue puttees and a dark blue puggaree on departure. An Anglo Boer War Service of Reconciliation is held annually on the first Sunday in June at the "Fallen Soldiers" (Boer War) Memorial in Kings Park attended by descendants and representative of all combatant nations. The date selected is the closest Sunday to the date of signing of the Treaty or Peace of Vereeniging (31 May 1902). The culmination of the service is the laying of the Emily Hobhouse wreath.

Significance

Unique series of stereoscopic images showing both the 1st and 2nd West Australian Mounted Infantry Contingents to the Anglo Boer War. Images contain details of uniforms, accoutrements, camp life, civic honours and departure.

Inscriptions & Markings

Photographed and published by Craig and Solin, Fremantle and Kalgoorlie

Queen's Colour - 1st Infantry Regiment (WA Volunteer Forces)

Australian Army Museum of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160

Union flag with red and gold fringe. In the centre a circle inscribed "Western Australia", surmounted by a crown. Within the circle a black swan on gold background.

Historical information

Presented to 1st Infantry Regiment (WA Volunteer Forces) by HE the Governor of WA, Lt-Colonel Sir Gerard Smith, KCMG at a Queen's Birthday parade held on the Recreation Ground, Bazaar Terrace, Perth (now where the Esplanade is situated), on 28 May 1896. Consecrated by Senior Chaplain of the Forces, the Very Reverend Dean Goldsmith. Purchased by the WA Government, with the sanction of the Home Authorities, the colour was manufactured at the Pimlico Army Clothing Depot, London. It was the first Queen's Colour to be presented to a Western Australian Army unit. (A detailed description of this colour appeared in "The West Australian" of 23 May 1896) This colour was subsequently inherited by successor Militia units to the 1st Infantry Regiment, including 11th Australian Infantry Regiment (Perth Regiment), 88th (Perth) Infantry, 11th Battalion (The Perth Regiment) and 11th/16th Battalion. The colour was handed over to the Perth City Council at a special parade of the 11th/16th Battalion held in Forrest Place on 7 June 1930, and was laid up in the Council Chambers in Murray Street. Together with the other historic colours handed over at the time, this colour later went into storage when Council moved premises in the early 1960's. Perth City Council had some restoration work carried out on these colours in 1975 and later had them on display in their display room at Council House, St Georges Terrace. They were subsequently placed in storage again. Following negotiations by the Army Museum of WA Perth City Council passed on these Colours to the Museum in November 1993.

Significance

Purchased by the WA Government, with the sanction of the Home Authorities, this was the first Queen's Colour to be presented to a Western Australian Army unit. (A detailed description of this colour appeared in "The West Australian" of 23 May 1896)