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Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre) Mount Helen, Victoria

The Federation University Australia Historical Collection, (formerly University of Ballarat), is held in the Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre (GBRC), and is located on the top floor of the E.J. Barker Library (Mt Helen Campus). The GBRC includes three special book collections of the library, the Geoffrey Blainey Mining Collection, the Federation University Australia Research Collection, and the Creedy Economics Collection.

Titles from the three library special collections can be searched online via http://innopac.federation.edu.au, but must be read in the Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre Supervised Reading Room.

The Federation University Historical Collection is an extensive collection of historical material dating from the formation of the Ballarat School of Mines in 1869. The collection covers material from Federation University's predecessors including the Ballarat School of Mines, Ballarat Teachers' College, State College of Victoria, Ballarat; the Ballarat Institute of Advanced Education, Ballarat College of Advanced Education, Ballarat University College, Wimmera Institute of TAFE, Monash Gippsland, Gippsland Institute and University of Ballarat. It is particularly strong in the themes of mining, education, and local history.

On 01 January 2014 the University became Federation University Australia with the amalgamation of the University of Ballarat and Monash University’s Gippsland campus. FedUni brings together skills and expertise throughout Ballarat, Gippsland and the Western region of Victoria for the benefit of our regional communities.

Links

Contact Information

location
PO Box 663 Ballarat Victoria 3353 (map)
phone
+61 03 5327 9168

Opening Hours

Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre Hours: Tues 9.30am - 1.00pm Wed 1.00pm to 5.00pm Thurs 1.00pm to 5.00pm Fri 9.30am - 1.00pm or by appointment

Entry Fee

Free entry.

Location

Federation University Australia, Mt Helen Campus Federation University Australia E.J. Barker Library (top floor) Mount Helen Victoria

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The Federation University Historical Collection is located at the Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre (GBRC) on the top floor of the E.J. Barker Library (Mt Helen Campus) and includes a supervised reading room where collections can be accessed and read. The GBRC also houses the Geoffrey Blainey Mining Collection and the Federation University Library Special Collections.

Titles from the Federation University Library collections can be searched online at http://innopac.federation.edu.au. The Federation University Historical Art Collection online catalogue is located at http://guerin.ballarat.edu.au/curator/collection/ and the Federation University Historical Collection is searchable via Victorian Collections.

Federation University Historical Collection is an extensive collection of historical material dating from the opening of the Ballarat School of Mines in 1870. The collection covers material from the Federation University's predecessors including the Ballarat School of Mines, Ballarat Teachers' College, State College of Victoria, Ballarat; the Ballarat Institute of Advanced Education, Ballarat College of Advanced Education, Ballarat University College, Wimmera Institute of TAFE, Monash Gippsland and University of Ballarat.

Significance

Federation University Historical Collection is significant because of its emphasis on local education, particularly at the tertiary level. It relates to the Ballarat School of Mines, Australia's first technical school, are an important aspect of the collection. Material on former staff, students and local identities are also housed in the collection. Through the Ballarat School of Mines Federation University is the third oldest tertiary institution in Australia, and has resulted in a strong and important emphasis on mining in the collection.

Mrs Robyn Thompson 2 September 2016 9:17 AM

Hello. I have just seen a photo of Pioneers of Ballarat on the web site. It has the Object registration 15771. A large group of men. I see my great ancestor D GUNN the photo. As I'm searching my family tree, I would love to have the photo of him Any chance that someone can help me with my request. Please contact me on [email protected] Robyn Thompson (Mrs)

Amanda Osborne 25 September 2016 4:28 PM

My great great grandfather, William Simpson, and his three brothers worked in a mining area called Hard Hills near or between Ballarat and Buninyong. He married Mary Kelly, an Irish Orphan girl,arrived on the Pemberton in May 1849, the same year. Can you please tell me if you can identify a previous gold mining area called Hard Hills or if there is any documentation or photographic records relating to same. My gratitude and thanks in anticipation. Amanda Osborne [email protected] 0437130393

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7153 items

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Woman

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A tintype portrait of a woman's head, attached to a card.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed lower left hand side of the card "American Studio, 324 Geo. St."

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of two young girls

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.2) A tintype portrait of two girls heads, attached to a card. The girls are wearing a cloak with a large bow at the front

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, 6 Sturt St Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Woman

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.3) A tintype portrait of a woman, attached to a card.

Significance

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Man

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.4) A tintype portrait of a man, attached to a card.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photo - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a child

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.5) A tintype portrait of a child, attached to a card.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a child

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A tintype portrait of a child, attached to a card.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of two seated men in suits

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.6) A tintype studio portrait of two seated men in suits, attached to a card, possibly brothers.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) In 1863-4 A.Marion & Co. 23 Soho Square, London, were publishing cartes for Southwell Brothers of 16 & 22 Baker Street W. London, and in c.1866 producing cartes wholesale for Mayall of Regent Street. They appear to have printed numerous cards with a very small name printed onto the lower front. Travelling photographers would purchase the cards and sometimes have their own personlaised details printed onto the back.

Inscriptions & Markings

On lower edge of card "marion Imp. Paris"

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Woman

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A tintype portrait of a woman's head, attached to a card.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, 6 Sturt St Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on the lower edge of the card "Allen & Gove, American Studion, 6 Sturt St, Ballarat"

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Man

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.8)A tintype portrait of a man's head, attached to a card. The cheeks have been hand coloured.

Significance

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, 6 Sturt St Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Woman in a hat

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.9) A tintype portrait of a woman's head, attached to a card. The cheeks have been hand coloured.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, 6 Sturt St Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Boy

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

.9) A tintype portrait of a child's head and torso, attached to a card. The boy is wearing a suit and the cheeks have been hand coloured.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, 6 Sturt St Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photograph - Little Gem tintype - Portrait of a Woman in a hat

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A tintype portrait of a woman's head and shoulders, attached to a card. The cheeks have been hand coloured.

Historical information

The tintype (or ferrotype or Melainotype) was produced on metallic sheet (not, actually, tin) instead of glass. The plate was coated with collodion and sensitized just before use. It was introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853. The most common size was about the same as the carte-de-visite, 5.5cm x 9.0cm, but both larger and smaller ferrotypes were made. The smallest were "Little Gem" tintypes, about the size of a postage-stamp, made simultaneously on a single plate in a camera with 12 or 16 lenses. They were often produced by travelling photographers, and were cheaper than Ambrotypes so made photography available to working classes, not just to the more well-to-do. The print would come out laterally reversed (as one sees oneself in a mirror). Being quite rugged, tintypes could be sent by post. Tintypes were eventually superseded by gelatin emulsion dry plates in the 1880s, though street photographers in various parts of the world continued with this process until the 1950s. (Above information abridged from http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/tintype.htm) The firm of Gove and Allen opened in Sydney in 1880 and were responsible for the belated popularizing of the gem tintype in Australia. The firm traded as both The American Gem Studio and The American Studio. Others franchises were opened in Melbourne, Ballarat and Sandhurst (Bendigo). The Sandhurst branch closed in 1882 and Adelaide in 1884. All Gove and Allen studios had ceased trading by 1885. The studio addresses were: 23 King William St, Adelaide; 324 George St, Sydney; 95 Swanston St, Melbourne; Howard Place, Sandhurst; 7 Queen St, Brisbane; The card mounts used in Gove and Allen studios in Australia are identical to those used in America. They were initially made of plain white card with embossing around the oval image opening in the mount while some also had simple geometric and floral printed designs as well. Although Gove and Allen studios produced the majority of gem tintypes in Australia, other studios offered them including: - London, American & Sydney Photo Company, 328 George St, Sydney; - David Edelsten, 55 & 57 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Burman's Portrait Rooms, St. George's Hall, 209 Bourke St, Melbourne; - Bell's Gem Portrait Studio, 57 Bourke St East, Melbourne; - R. H. Kenny, Bridge St, 6 Sturt St Ballarat; - Marinus W. Bent, Sandhurst (Bendigo); - George Fisher, Victoria; - Anson Brothers, Hobart Town. (Abridged information from http://members.ozemail.com.au/~msafier/photos/tintypes.html)

Photo - People in car outside "Laura Villa" Smeaton

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Sepia photograph showing 4 people sitting in a car outside The Wright Familys' "Laura Villa" property at Smeaton. Left hand back seat - Mrs W. Wright, Mrs Kelso Front seat: F.L.Redman (driving), W. Wright

Historical information

In 1860 Smeaton residents appealed for funds to establish a school. Patrick Curtain, and his co-workers raised more than £150 plus a land grant (Allot A, Sect 2, Township of Smeaton). Head Teacher John Forbes, with assistant Zillah North, opened a timber school building which measured 36ftx18ft (11.0x5.5m) on 1 September 1861 with 44 children. Rising enrolment to 65 in 1868 made building alterations necessary. During 1870-1 a residence of four rooms was supplied and in October 1882 a 20ftx18ft (6.1x5.5m) classroom. In 1907 a new brick building accommodated 122 children. Among notable ex-pupils are Major-General Bridgeford, Frank Wright ( Musical Director of the London County Council), Alex Wright, (AKA singer Andre Navarre), and Les Brooks. (Visions and Realisations)

Inscriptions & Markings

Taken at "Laura Villa" Smeaton by Harold Hausen

Photo - Young man in an army uniform

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Frank Wright as a young man in an army (cadet) uniform. Hat is badged "71". Taken on the verandah of his home "Laura Villa", Smeaton.

Inscriptions & Markings

Cadet Frank Wright, Smeaton. 15 years old

Photo - Frank Wright at Daylesford

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Frank Wright, aged 22, in a bush location at Daylesford - possibly at a mineral water spring.

Historical information

In 1860 Smeaton residents appealed for funds to establish a school. Patrick Curtain, and his co-workers raised more than £150 plus a land grant (Allot A, Sect 2, Township of Smeaton). Head Teacher John Forbes, with assistant Zillah North, opened a timber school building which measured 36ftx18ft (11.0x5.5m) on 1 September 1861 with 44 children. Rising enrolment to 65 in 1868 made building alterations necessary. During 1870-1 a residence of four rooms was supplied and in October 1882 a 20ftx18ft (6.1x5.5m) classroom. In 1907 a new brick building accommodated 122 children. Among notable ex-pupils are Major-General Bridgeford, Frank Wright ( Musical Director of the London County Council), Alex Wright, (AKA singer Andre Navarre), and Les Brooks. (Visions and Realisations)

Newspaper - The Velocipede, No 6, Saturday September 11, 1869

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Four page printed newspaper with an articles including 'A Great Earthquake' [Lisbon 1755) and 'To My Pipe'. Includes numerous advertisements relating to Ballarat businesses.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped 'W.G. Chalmers"

Book - Transition: The IBM Story

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Soft covered book of 204 pages.

Historical information

The University of Ballarat has an alliance with IBM. Students are able to 'earn as you learn' - working at IBM while studying at the University of Ballarat.

Book - Cloud Pool Fire Veil Shield

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Black, hard-covered artist's book produced in a limited edition of 22 (of which this one is number number 6). The images contained in the book were first created in pastel then scanned and computer manipulated before being Laser copied and Intron transferred onto Indian Khadi Hot Press Natural Off-white 210 gsm paper, in an edition of 22.

Historical information

Born in Scotland, Allan Mann studied at the Glasgow School of Art, and worked in many tertiary institutions in Great Britain and Australia. Allan Mann arrived in Australia in 1987, lecturing at the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education, Queensland, then the Riverina-Murray Institute of Higher Education Wagga Wagga, NSW, in 1981. He returned to the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee, Scotland between 1984 and 1985. Allan Mann was appointed to the University of Ballarat (then Ballarat College of Advanced Education) in 1987. He retired as an Associate Professor of the University of Ballarat Arts Academy in 2010.

Inscriptions & Markings

Signed an numbered by the artist on the ISBN page.

Document - Uncoined Gold Exported

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

White Foolscap printed Government document listing gold returns between 1872 and 1879. The list shows the amount of uncoined gold exported from Victoria since the establishment of the Melbourne Mint.

Book - Birds of Australia

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Green hard cover book, black leather spine and corners. Title on spine written in gold letters, gold decorations on spine. Pages not numbered. Coloured plates (lithographs).

Historical information

Not Gould although on spine. Similar on abcbooks.com.au Minutes of the SMB council 14 April 1891 "6, A requisition from Professor Krause for a new work on the birds of Australia was referred to the Education committee. Broinowski was commisioned by the Department of Public Instruction in New South Wales to supply them with pictures of Australian birds which he published in 6 volumes from 1887 - 1891. Gracius Broinowski was born in Poland in 1837. To avoid conscription with the Russian army he roamed Europe in poverty,his possessions having been stolen earlier in Germany. Hearing tales of the Australian gold fields, he borderd the 'Windjammer' bound for Victoria as a deckhand. Broinowski swam ashore at Portland, Victoria in 1857 age twenty. For seven years he walked from one rural settlement to another working as a shepherd, stockman and independent farmer. In 1864 Bronoiwski married in Melbourne and found work with Hamel & Ferguson (print sellers and publishers). 'The Birds of Australia' was finalised in 1891 with 303 full page illustrations lithographed in colour with notes on over 700 species. Limited to 1000 copies the edition sold out quickly. Bronowski died in 1913 at Mosmon NSW, aged 76. He was survived by his wife, a daughter and 6 sons.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped throughout the book "School of Mines Ballarat Library".

Book - The work of Charles A. Platt

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Book, Hard brown Cover. Title on the spine "The work of Charles A. Platt". Manufactural details on spine. Page no. 181. Black & white plates and plans.

Historical information

Charles Platt was born in New York in 1861 and died in 1933. He studied art at the National Academy of Design. In 1880, Charles went to Paris to study landscape painting and, while there, he travelled to Italy with his brother. Though he was influenced by Italian detailing, his designs were not copies of Italian gardens He was known as an architect and illustrator not as a garden designer. In 1880, he trained as an etcher with Stephen Parrish in Gloucester, Massachusetts. He also trained at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League in New York and later in Paris with Gustave Boulanger and Jules Joseph Lefebvre at the Académie Julian. Charles exhibited his paintings and etchings and gained his first audience in Paris Salon of 1885. Betweem 1880 – 1890 , he made hundreds of etchings of architecture and landscapes. In 1900, Charles received a bronze medal at the Paris Exposition Universelle. In 1907 he designed a townhouse for Sara Delano Roosevelt on East 65th Street in New York. Eleanor Roosevelt called Charles A. Platt "an architect of great taste" who with the townhouse had "made the most of every inch of space." and in 1918, he de­si­gned the Freer Art Gal­lery in Wa­shing­ton.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on page 43, 93, 123, 135, 161, 171"Picton Hopkins & Sons PTY.LTD"

Book - Iron Roofs: examples of design

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Book. Large brown hard cover. Title written in gold on front cover and on spine. Manufacturer name also written in gold on spine. Illustrations, plates (black & white). 37 p. + plates.

Book - Polychromatic Ornament

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Book. Large red leather cover. Title written in gold on spine. Illustrations (black & white), 100 of chromolithographic plates in gold, silver and colours. Various styles of ancient, oriental and medieval art including the Renaissance, the 17th, and the 18th centuries. Subjects are arranged in historical order. Text translated from the original French. The book includes a table of contents, a list of plates, a classified index and an introduction.

Historical information

Monsieur Charles Auguste Albert Racinet was born in Paris on July 20th, 1825. His job was representative of a group of 19th-century industrial draughtsmen, teachers of technical drawing and factory studio manager. He helped in spreading the most significant design of the decorative arts of the time. Racinet learned his trade from his father. He was trained by neo-classical artists in the ambit of Percier and Fontaine. August Racinet was influenced by the Schinkel tendency and supported by architects such as Hittorf and Voillet-le-Duc.

Inscriptions & Markings

A book plate inside front cover with a heading "Ballarat School of Art Library No. R/171. Stamped with "Reference","Education Department" and "Ballarat School of Art Library"

Book - The Work of Dwight James Baum.

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Book with large blue hard cover. Title is written on the front cover and the spine in gold. Manufacturer's logo is written on front cover in gold. The book includes index, preface and an introduction. black and white illustrations, plates and floor planes of the architect's work such as Ca d Zan, the fantastical Venetian Gothic waterfront palace of John and Mable Ringling in Sarasota, Florida and the stately Italianate house of Anthony Campagna in Riverdale, New York and more.

Historical information

Dwight James Baum is an American architect. He was born in 1886 in Newville, New York. As a young man, Baum moved to Syracuse. In 1909, he graduated from Syracuse University with an architecture degree. He worked for Boring and Tilton and Sanford White which are well known Architecture firms in America. Around 1912, he started his own residential design firm. During the 1920s, Baum designed a significant buildings and several houses in Sarasota, Tampa, Terrace, Temple and Florida all in the Mediterranean Revival Style such as the Ringlings dubbed Cà d'Zan, which is now known as the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. In 1923-1924, he also designed Sunset Hill for Mrs. Eugene D. Stocker at Warren, New York which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. During the Depression Baum became involved with Good Housekeeping Magazine as consulting architect, and as designer of their building exhibit at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. His later work includes Hendricks Memorial Chapel at Syracuse University, with John Russell Pope in 1929–1930 and the pedestal for V. Renzo Baldi's statue of Columbus in the city's Columbus Circle. Dwight James Baum died in 1939.

Photo album - Photographs of New Zealand Scenery, 1886

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Large green album containing numerous B/W original photographs of New Zealand, especially volcanos. - Includes Pink and White Terraces (no longer in existance). Photos were taken before and after volcanic eruption. A recent inclusion is article on the terraces by Federation University's George Hook and Stephen Carey.

Historical information

Before Mt Tarawera erupted, the Pink and White Terraces at Lake Rotomahana in New Zealand’s North Island, were considered one of the wonders of the world. Tourists came to soak in the thermal hot pools and view the marble-like terraces. Due to a volcanic eruption of Mt Tarawera On June 10 1886, between 108-120 people were killed and several settlements were destroyed. It also destroyed the world-famous Pink and White Terraces. The terraces became a crater over 100 metres deep. Within 15 years it filled with water, forming a much larger new Lake Rotomahana. The chain of craters at Waimangu became the site of many new geothermal features, including Waimangu Geyser, the largest in the world, and New Zealand’s largest hot spring, Frying Pan Lake. The Burton brothers (photographers), Alfred Burton was born in 1834 in Leicester and died in 1914 in Dunedin. His brother Walter Burton was born in 1836 and died in 1880. Many of the Burton Brothers' works and original equipment were collected by Dunedin photographer and historian Hardwicke Knight, and are now housed in the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington. This album was donated to the Ballarat School of Mines Museum by James Oddie in 1887. (See Cat. No. 458, No. 1720) Alfred Burton was born in 1834 at Leicester and died at Dunedun, New Zealand, in 1914. Walter Burton was born in 1836, and died in 1889.

Inscriptions & Markings

Each photo has a caption.

Book - Art Ages

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Blue, large, hard cover. Black tape edges and spine. Title is written in orange on front cover. Ribbon ties stitched to the edge of the cover used to close book by tying them together. Loose pages showing coloured and b/w illustrations of the ages of art. Includes fold-out text booklet with five pages. The book has a number of coloured prints of examples of art through the ages, including Egyptian, Assyrian, Grecian, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, Saracenic, Gothic, Renaissance and Georgian.

Historical information

Pedro J. Lemos was an educator and artist. He was also the editor of the School of Arts Magazine and Director of Stanford University Museum of Fine Arts. He was born in 1882 and died in 1954. This art portfolio contains ten periods of art history: Egyptian, Assyrian, Grecian, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, Saracenic, Gothic, Renaissance and Georgian. Some of the images are: The Temple of Luxor in Egypt, Temple of Zeus, the Arch of Titus, Gothic cathedral in Cologne, Assyrian furniture and weapons, Greek architectural decorations, Byzantine costumes, Renaissance weapons and household articles, plus much more.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inside the front cover there is a plate titled "Ballarat Techincal Art School Library no. R/400". It is also stamped with the publisher's details.

Book - Peasant Art in Europe

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

Red cloth large hardcover book. Title is written on the front cover and on spine in gold. Small gold circle pattern on front cover. The book contains 100 coloured plates, 32 b/w plates with images of peasant handicraft. The book includes table of content, index, bibliography and a library due date card inside back cover, it was borrowed by Donald Ferguson(an art lecturer)on 13 May 1957. Page numbers written in roman numerals.

Historical information

"Peasant Art in Europe" is an art book selected and arranged by H. TH. Bossert. It contains about 2100 examples of European folk-arts, such as ornaments, ceramics, embroideries, wickerwork and basketwork, fabrics, wood, handicraft, glass and metalwork.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inside front cover there is a plate titled "Ballarat Technical Art School Library no. R/345". Each page has a caption under the image stating what the image shows in 3 different languages.

Book - Engineering: an illustrated weekly journal.

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A book with blue large hard cover. Title and publication date are written on spine in gold. Illustrations (fig., plates, plans, diagrams) in B/W. Includes collection of the engineering weekly journal vol. xxxix-from January to June 1885. This book contains a wide range of articles and reviews related to industrial developments. Page no.712.

Historical information

William Henry Maw was a British civil engineer and astronomer. He was born in 1838 and died in 1924 at eighty-five years. Maw worked as an assistant at the workshops of the Eastern Counties Railway before he became a draughtsman in the design office. He designed the first outside cylinder locomotive for use in India. In 1865 he founded the journal Engineering and continued to be an editor for the rest of his life. Maw became a consulting engineer. He was president of the Civil and Mechanical Engineers' Society, the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the Institution of Civil Engineers. This book contains a wide range of articles and reviews related to industrial developments such as rail mill engines at the Dowlais iron works (constructed by Messrs. Kitson and Co., engineers, Leeds), cable tramway, Clay-street, San Francisco, U.S.A., road and railway bridge over the river Dnieper, at Jekaterinoslow, Russia (constructed from the designs of Professor N. Belelubsky, St. Petersburg, by the Brjonsk iron works) etc.

Book - Details of Gothic Architecture

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A large book with blue hardcover and black cloth corners and spine. Illus. with b&w plates of architectual drawings. Vol.1. Title is printed in black and red. This book contains measured drawings of details from parish churches. It includes 8p. table of contents.

Historical information

“Details of Gothic Architecture is measured and drawn from existing examples by James K. Colling, author of ‘Gothic Ornaments’.“—Front cover. It contains detailed drawings of parish churches during the 19 century.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inscription on title page "W. H. Piper, architect". A plate inside front cover titled "Ballarat Technical Art School Library No. AD/14".

Book - Old England: a pictorial museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Baronial, Municipal and Popular Antiquities

Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre), Mount Helen

A large leather brown/gilt cover book with black leather bound and corners. 392 p. with coloured and b/w illustrations. It includes a table of contents of volume 1, 18 illuminated engraved (colour) plates, indexes to the engravings at the end of the book. 'Old England' gilt decoration on spine. The book shows how life was like in old England in regards to people, places, architecture and fashions, etc. from Roman times through to Industrial age. The book is published in two volumes, the book in hand contains volume 1 only.

Historical information

Charles Knight is an English publisher and author. He was born at Windsor in 1791, and died in 1873 at Addlestone, Surrey. This book covers the period of English history from pre Roman times to the Industrial age. It shows how life was like in old England in regards to people, places, architecture and fashions, etc. The book contains 1000's of wonderful engravings, hand coloured plates beside 100's of pages of text contained in one volume.

Inscriptions & Markings

A plate inside front cover titled "Ballarat Technical Art School Library No. R/170"