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Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages Fitzroy, Victoria

VACL is the peak Indigenous body for Victorian Aboriginal Languages, created to develop partnerships with, and provide resources and information to, government and non-government and community organisations. The VACL Library is a repository for specialist language materials for Indigenous communities. It also houses a range of media including books, audio-visual materials, manuscripts and other items in print and electronic form.

Contact Information

location
70 Hanover Street Fitzroy Victoria (map)
phone
+61 (03) 9600 3811
Contact

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm (closed Public Holidays) Appointment required. Please telephone to arrange a visit.

Entry Fee

Free

Location

70 Hanover Street Fitzroy Victoria

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The VACL Library is a unique and highly significant resource. It features the most complete holding of materials on Victorian Aboriginal languages in existence, and is the only place prioritising Community as well as historical and linguistic materials. To achieve VACL’s aim of providing and maintaining a central resource for Victorian Indigenous languages to benefit local Aboriginal communities and individuals of Victorian Aboriginal descent, the Library’s focus is on Aboriginal languages in Victoria. However, the collection extends to resources on interstate Indigenous languages, as well as covering issues of endangered languages and language reclamation around the world. Although its focus remains on Aboriginal languages of Victoria, the Library's specialisation encompasses a diverse range of subject areas. The collection contains resources covering, but not restricted to, the subjects of linguistics, history, sociology, education and botany.

Take Down Notice for the VACL Collection.

Please contact us in the event that you are the owner of the copyright or related rights in any of the material on this website, or in a publication or broadcast to which VACL has provided material from its collections, and you believe that the material may be subject to a third party ownership or another legal claim,or you believe that use of this material infringes your intellectual property or any other rights.
We will withdraw the material from our website upon receipt of your written objection and our initial verification of your complaint, while the matter is investigated. Your objection will be acknowledged within seven working days of receipt.

For any other copyright queries, please contact us on vacl@vaclang.org.au

Elizabeth Swan 5 July 2016 5:07 PM

Hi I'm an Aboriginal teacher who is teaching Aboriginal Gamilaroi language in a high school years 7 and 8. I have very limited resources and wondering if there is anything on our language that I may be able to borrow or purchase .

Jenny Gibson 6 July 2016 11:31 AM

Dear Elizabeth, thank you very much for contacting us. Although we do have resources relating to Gamilaroi Language, items in our collection are not for sale or loan. I'm wondering where you are located. If we know your region, we might be able to point you to more local organisations that could help you and your students. If you're in or ever around Melbourne, we would love you to visit. If you have any questions about this, please don't hesitate to contact us on (03) 9600 3811 or info@vaclang.org.au. Thanks again for your message, Kind Regards, Jenny Gibson

Patricia Holt 2 May 2017 8:14 AM

thank you for the website. I would like to know how you would name the original people of the Creswick, Vic. area. I have seen mention of Wemba Wemba and Dja Dja Warrung, also Kulin nation (in your website for the dictionary of Wathawoorrong. Thank you

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972 items

Book - The study of Language

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Issues in language study: origin of language, animals & human language, writing, phonetics, phonology, words & word-formation processes, morphology, grammar, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis, language and the brain, language acquisition, gestures and sign languages, languages and regional variation, language and social variation, language and culture.

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations, b&w photographs, maps

Book - Koori studies project : notes for teachers

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Display book with text, coloured photos, historical photcopies, time line, etc.

Inscriptions & Markings

colour photographs, games, newspaper clippings

Audio CD - Wemba Wemba and Wergaia language elicitation

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Recorded in Echuca. Nancy Egan speaks and sings in Wemba Wemba. She talks about making kangaroo and possum skin rugs. Wergaia vocabulary with Walter Kennedy and Billy Marks.

Inscriptions & Markings

CD, recording notes

Book - Aboriginal tales of Australia

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Populated by mythical beings, these stories of heros, birds, rivers, lakes and shores have been passed down over generations and today offer a window of understanding into the powerful Aboriginal connection to the land.

Inscriptions & Markings

word lists

Book - Australia's oral history collections : a national directory

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A directory of oral history collections, collected in a state by state order.

Inscriptions & Markings

directory listings

Book - Vanishing voices : the extinction of the world's languages

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Looking at vanishing languages from around the world and what can be done to prevent it.

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations, b&w photographs, maps

Book - Plants of significance to the Ganai Community

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

This publication identifies the plants which are known to have been used by the Ganai community. A photograph is provided for each plants and is accompanied by an explanation of the plant's usage. The scientific name, common name and the Ganai name, where known, is given for each plant.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maps, colour illustrations, colour photographs, glossary

Journal - Melbourne papers in linguistics and applied linguistics

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A variety of papers on linguistic and applied languages.

Inscriptions & Markings

word lists

Book - Peninsula plants : a field guide to indigenous plants of the Mornington Peninsula suitable for cultivation

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

One plant detailed per double page, with clear illustrations and descriptions.

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations, glossary

Book - Gulpa ngawal : Indigenous deep listening

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Introduction: In the Ngungikurungkurr language of the Daly River in the Northern Territory, the word for "Deep Listening" is 'Dadirri' (Ungunmurr, 2009) and in the Yorta Yorta language of the Murray River in Victoria, it is 'Gulpa Ngawal'. The closest we can get to describing it in English is deep and respectful listening which builds community. Deep listening draws on many senses beyond what is simply heard. It can take place in silence. Deep listening can be applied as a way of being together, as a research methodology and as a way of making a difference.

Inscriptions & Markings

colour illustrations, colour photographs

Book - Straight to the source : a guide to sources for Victorian history

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Journal - Language documentation and description, Vol. 4

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

CD ROM: The disappearing sounds of the worlds Languages, Peter Ladefoged, 2006

Book - Languages : expanding your world : plan to implement the Victorian Government's vision for languages education 2013-2025

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A long term government plan to increase diversity of language learning and proficiency across Victorian schools.

Inscriptions & Markings

colour photographs, colour illustrations, tables

Book - Wurundjeri (Woi wurrung) : cultural resource kit

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Aimed at primary aged children, contains stories, activities and information to assist in education the young person.

Inscriptions & Markings

games, colour illustrations

Periodical - Australian Aboriginal studies : journal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

'Whose Ethics?':Codifying and enacting ethics in research settings Bringing ethics up to date? A review of the AIATSIS ethical guidelines Michael Davis (Independent Academic) A revision of the AIATSIS Guidelines for Ethical Research in Indigenous Studies was carried out during 2009-10. The purpose of the revision was to bring the Guidelines up to date in light of a range of critical developments that have occurred in Indigenous rights, research and knowledge management since the previous version of the Guidelines was released in 2000. In this paper I present an outline of these developments, and briefly discuss the review process. I argue that the review, and the developments that it responded to, have highlighted that ethical research needs to be thought about more as a type of behaviour and practice between engaged participants, and less as an institutionalised, document-focused and prescriptive approach. The arrogance of ethnography: Managing anthropological research knowledge Sarah Holcombe (ANU) The ethnographic method is a core feature of anthropological practice. This locally intensive research enables insight into local praxis and culturally relative practices that would otherwise not be possible. Indeed, empathetic engagement is only possible in this close and intimate encounter. However, this paper argues that this method can also provide the practitioner with a false sense of his or her own knowing and expertise and, indeed, with arrogance. And the boundaries between the anthropologist as knowledge sink - cultural translator and interpreter - and the knowledge of the local knowledge owners can become opaque. Globalisation and the knowledge ?commons?, exemplified by Google, also highlight the increasing complexities in this area of the governance and ownership of knowledge. Our stronghold of working in remote areas and/or with marginalised groups places us at the forefront of negotiating the multiple new technological knowledge spaces that are opening up in the form of Indigenous websites and knowledge centres in these areas. Anthropology is not immune from the increasing awareness of the limitations and risks of the intellectual property regime for protecting or managing Indigenous knowledge. The relevance of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in opening up a ?rights-based? discourse, especially in the area of knowledge ownership, brings these issues to the fore. For anthropology to remain relevant, we have to engage locally with these global discourses. This paper begins to traverse some of this ground. Protocols: Devices for translating moralities, controlling knowledge and defining actors in Indigenous research, and critical ethical reflection Margaret Raven (Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy (ISTP), Murdoch University) Protocols are devices that act to assist with ethical research behaviour in Indigenous research contexts. Protocols also attempt to play a mediating role in the power and control inherent in research. While the development of bureaucratically derived protocols is on the increase, critiques and review of protocols have been undertaken in an ad hoc manner and in the absence of an overarching ethical framework or standard. Additionally, actors implicated in research networks are seldom theorised. This paper sketches out a typology of research characters and the different moral positioning that each of them plays in the research game. It argues that by understanding the ways actors enact research protocols we are better able to understand what protocols are, and how they seek to build ethical research practices. Ethics and research: Dilemmas raised in managing research collections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander materials Grace Koch (AIATSIS) This paper examines some of the ethical dilemmas for the proper management of research collections of Indigenous cultural materials, concentrating upon the use of such material for Native Title purposes. It refers directly to a number of points in the draft of the revised AIATSIS Guidelines for Ethical Research in Indigenous Studies and draws upon both actual and hypothetical examples of issues that may arise when requests are made for Indigenous material. Specific concerns about ethical practices in collecting data and the subsequent control of access to both the data itself and to published works based upon it are raised within the context of several types of collections, including those held by AIATSIS and by Native Title Representative Bodies. Ethics or social justice? Heritage and the politics of recognition Laurajane Smith (ANU) Nancy Fraser?s model of the politics of recognition is used to examine how ethical practices are interconnected with wider struggles for recognition and social justice. This paper focuses on the concept of 'heritage' and the way it is often uncritically linked to 'identity' to illustrate how expert knowledge can become implicated in struggles for recognition. The consequences of this for ethical practice and for rethinking the role of expertise, professional discourses and disciplinary identity are discussed. The ethics of teaching from country Michael Christie (CDU), with the assistance of Yi?iya Guyula, Kathy Gotha and Dh�?gal Gurruwiwi The 'Teaching from Country' program provided the opportunity and the funding for Yol?u (north-east Arnhem Land Aboriginal) knowledge authorities to participate actively in the academic teaching of their languages and cultures from their remote homeland centres using new digital technologies. As two knowledge systems and their practices came to work together, so too did two divergent epistemologies and metaphysics, and challenges to our understandings of our ethical behaviour. This paper uses an examination of the philosophical and pedagogical work of the Yol?u Elders and their students to reflect upon ethical teaching and research in postcolonial knowledge practices. Closing the gaps in and through Indigenous health research: Guidelines, processes and practices Pat Dudgeon (UWA), Kerrie Kelly (Australian Indigenous Psychologists Association) and Roz Walker (UWA) Research in Aboriginal contexts remains a vexed issue given the ongoing inequities and injustices in Indigenous health. It is widely accepted that good research providing a sound evidence base is critical to closing the gap in Aboriginal health and wellbeing outcomes. However, key contemporary research issues still remain regarding how that research is prioritised, carried out, disseminated and translated so that Aboriginal people are the main beneficiaries of the research in every sense. It is widely acknowledged that, historically, research on Indigenous groups by non-Indigenous researchers has benefited the careers and reputations of researchers, often with little benefit and considerably more harm for Indigenous peoples in Australia and internationally. This paper argues that genuine collaborative and equal partnerships in Indigenous health research are critical to enable Aboriginal and Torres Islander people to determine the solutions to close the gap on many contemporary health issues. It suggests that greater recognition of research methodologies, such as community participatory action research, is necessary to ensure that Aboriginal people have control of, or significant input into, determining the Indigenous health research agenda at all levels. This can occur at a national level, such as through the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Road Map on Indigenous research priorities (RAWG 2002), and at a local level through the development of structural mechanisms and processes, including research ethics committees? research protocols to hold researchers accountable to the NHMRC ethical guidelines and values which recognise Indigenous culture in all aspects of research. Researching on Ngarrindjeri Ruwe/Ruwar: Methodologies for positive transformation Steve Hemming (Flinders University) , Daryle Rigney (Flinders University) and Shaun Berg (Berg Lawyers) Ngarrindjeri engagement with cultural and natural resource management over the past decade provides a useful case study for examining the relationship between research, colonialism and improved Indigenous wellbeing. The Ngarrindjeri nation is located in south-eastern Australia, a ?white? space framed by Aboriginalist myths of cultural extinction recycled through burgeoning heritage, Native Title, natural resource management ?industries?. Research is a central element of this network of intrusive interests and colonising practices. Government management regimes such as natural resource management draw upon the research and business sectors to form complex alliances to access funds to support their research, monitoring, policy development, management and on-ground works programs. We argue that understanding the political and ethical location of research in this contemporary management landscape is crucial to any assessment of the potential positive contribution of research to 'Bridging the Gap' or improving Indigenous wellbeing. Recognition that research conducted on Ngarrindjeri Ruwe/Ruwar (country/body/spirit) has impacts on Ngarrindjeri and that Ngarrindjeri have a right and responsibility to care for their lands and waters are important platforms for any just or ethical research. Ngarrindjeri have linked these rights and responsibilities to long-term community development focused on Ngarrindjeri capacity building and shifts in Ngarrindjeri power in programs designed to research and manage Ngarrindjeri Ruwe/Ruwar. Research agreements that protect Ngarrindjeri interests, including cultural knowledge and intellectual property, are crucial elements in these shifts in power. A preliminary review of ethics resources, with particular focus on those available online from Indigenous organisations in WA, NT and Qld Sarah Holcombe (ANU) and Natalia Gould (La Trobe University) In light of a growing interest in Indigenous knowledge, this preliminary review maps the forms and contents of some existing resources and processes currently available and under development in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia, along with those enacted through several cross-jurisdictional initiatives. A significant majority of ethics resources have been developed in response to a growing interest in the application of Indigenous knowledge in land and natural resource management. The aim of these resources is to ?manage? (i.e. protect and maintain) Indigenous knowledge by ensuring ethical engagement with the knowledge holders. Case studies are drawn on from each jurisdiction to illustrate both the diversity and commonality in the approach to managing this intercultural engagement. Such resources include protocols, guidelines, memorandums of understanding, research agreements and strategic plans. In conducting this review we encourage greater awareness of the range of approaches in practice and under development today, while emphasising that systematic, localised processes for establishing these mechanisms is of fundamental importance to ensuring equitable collaboration. Likewise, making available a range of ethics tools and resources also enables the sharing of the local and regional initiatives in this very dynamic area of Indigenous knowledge rights.

Inscriptions & Markings

b&w photographs, colour photographs

Book with CD - Maambakoort 4

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Language reader.

Inscriptions & Markings

Colour photographs, word lists, CD

Booklet - Korero Maori : give it a go

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Little booklet aimed at revival of Maori language, using sport as a basis.

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations

Book - The Kombumerri : Aboriginal people of the Gold Coast

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Comprehensive book with coloured photos of the Kombumerri people and their traditional life in Queensland?s Gold Coast. Tells of white settlement, historic sites, flora and fauna, customs and myths, repression and land.

Inscriptions & Markings

colour photographs, b&w photographs, maps

CD-ROM - Photos from the Endangered Languages Conference Broome September 2003

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

CD ROM of the Conference held in Broome, 2003, photos include speakers, accomodation and the local scenery.

Inscriptions & Markings

photographs

DVD - Brewarrina's Aboriginal language program

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

The language program was developed by teachers at Brewarrina, and is designed to appeal strongly to the imaginations of their students. The students are encouraged to work in groups and individually to unearth their local history and cultural backgrounds, by studying family trees and gathering oral histories, by making excursions to significant sites, and by re-discovering Aboriginal language and cultural practices.

Inscriptions & Markings

DVD

Book - Guide to writing languages of the Kimberley

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Includes notes on pronunciation, South Kimberley orthography, and an inventary of orthographies. Has small black and white illustrations.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maps, b&w illustrations, tables

Book - Crossing country : the alchemy of Western Arnhem Land art

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Hetti Perkins introduces this collection of reproductions of of Western Arnhem Land bark paintings, rock art, woven fibre art and wooden sculpture that was exhibited by the Art Gallery of NSW in 2004, emphasising the cultural foundations of the Kuninjku artists, their beliefs, artistic conventions and innovations. The book includes interviews with traditional rock and bark artists (including some language), and essays describing the connection of the people to the land, their spiritual beliefs and their art. There are also reproductions of works on paper and woven forms and an essay on the role of women in producing these art forms. An essay by Professor Jon Altmann is entitled "Brokering Kuninjku Art: Artists, Institutions and the Market. A chronolgy details the history of aboriginal art in the area, there are biographies of the artists whose works were included in the exhibition, a list of the works themselves, a glossary of place names, art terms, aboriginal, linguistic and anthropological terms, and a select bibliography. The list of contributors includes, as well as the two mentioned above, Dr Murray Garde, Apolline Kohen, Steven Miller, Cara Pinchbeck and Dr Luke Taylor.

Inscriptions & Markings

Colour photographs

Book - The lands manual : a finding guide to Victorian lands records 1836-1983

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

charts, extracts from original documents

Booklet - National principles and guidelines for Aboriginal studies and Torres Strait Islander studies K-12

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

Colour illustrations

Book - Recommended books for Aboriginal studies

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Includes principles for review and evaluation of materials; reviews of suitable material for junior primary, primary, junior secondary, senior secondary; not recommended list; includes title index, subject and level index, general index.

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations

Book - Museums London : a handbook

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

b&w illustrations

Book - Wita-wita-kurlu

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w photographs

Book - Australian Aborigines : the languages and customs of several tribes of Aborigines in the western district of Victoria, Australia

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A comprehensive vocabulary of Western District languages Djab Wurrung, Peek Woorong and Dhauwurd Wurrung. Includes a vocabulary of birds and reptiles, and relationship terms for each language.

Inscriptions & Markings

word lists, b&w photographs

Book - Butchulla wurru = Butchulla girl

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Short story for children in the Butchulla language translated by Jeanie Bell and Joyce Bonner.

Inscriptions & Markings

Illustrations, word lists

Book - Dictionary of Aboriginal placenames of Southwest Victoria

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Dictionary including Indigenous and European place names. Origins are given.

Inscriptions & Markings

maps, b&w photographs

Book - Langwij comes to school : promoting literacy among speakers of Aboriginal English and Australian Creoles

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Booklet intended to help teachers to assist young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students achieve proficiency in Standard Australian English (SAE) through a better understanding of the diversity and validity of the language backgrounds of these students.

Inscriptions & Markings

maps, colour photographs, colour illustrations

Book - Wild food plants of Australia

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

The fieldguide edition of Wild Food Plants of Australia. It is presented in a concise, convenient form to facilitate quick and ready reference in the field. Tim Low has provided a truly reliable guide to our edible flora, making identification easy. Thus it is a perfect companion for bushwalkers, naturalists, scientists and, with emphasis on wild food cuisine, gourmets. Low describes more than 180 plants - from the most tasty and significant plant foods of southern and eastern Australia to the more important and spectacular inland and tropical foods.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maps, colour photographs, b&w illustrations

Book - Victorian languages : a late survey

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Outlines and notes on a variety of Victorian languages. Chapters on the Wemba Wemba language; the Wergaia Language (Djadjala dialect); the Madimadi language; and the Narinari language; phonetic notes on Gundidj, Woiwuru, Yodayoda, Ganai (Gippsland) and Southern Ngarigu; Aboriginal - English Vocabularies; and an English - Aboriginal vocabulary.

Inscriptions & Markings

maps, word lists, b&w photographs

Book - Ngun? Koongurrukun? =? Speak Koongurrukun?

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Gives Phonology, grammatical interpretations and lexicon. Provides complex detail of the above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Colour photographs, word lists

Journal - Language documentation and description, Vol. 5

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w photographs, graphs, word lists, screen shots

Video - Warranna Purruna : Pa:mpi Tungarar : living languages

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

The video "tells the story of two types of Australian Indigenous language revival programs. The languages involved are Kaurna and Ngarrindjeri."

Inscriptions & Markings

videocassette

Periodical - Australian Aboriginal studies : journal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

We don?t leave our identities at the city limits: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban localities Bronwyn Fredericks Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live in cities and towns are often thought of as ?less Indigenous? than those who live ?in the bush?, as though they are ?fake? Aboriginal people ? while ?real? Aboriginal people live ?on communities? and ?real? Torres Strait Islander people live ?on islands?. Yet more than 70 percent of Australia?s Indigenous peoples live in urban locations (ABS 2007), and urban living is just as much part of a reality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as living in remote discrete communities. This paper examines the contradictions and struggles that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience when living in urban environments. It looks at the symbols of place and space on display in the Australian cities of Melbourne and Brisbane to demonstrate how prevailing social, political and economic values are displayed. Symbols of place and space are never neutral, and this paper argues that they can either marginalise and oppress urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, or demonstrate that they are included and engaged. Juggling with pronouns: Racist discourse in spoken interaction on the radio Di Roy While the discourse of deficit with regard to Australian Indigenous health and wellbeing has been well documented in print media and through images on film and on television, radio talk concerning this discourse remains underresearched. This paper interrogates the power of an interactive news interview, aired on the Radio National Breakfast program on ABC Radio in 2011, to maintain and reproduce the discourse of deficit, despite the best intentions of the interview participants. Using a conversation-analytical approach, and membership categorisation analysis in particular, this paper interrogates the spoken interaction between a well-known radio interviewer and a respected medical researcher into Indigenous eye health. It demonstrates the recreation of a discourse emanating from longstanding hegemonies between mainstream and Indigenous Australians. Analysis of firstperson pronoun use shows the ongoing negotiation of social category boundaries and construction of moral identities through ascriptions to category members, upon which the intelligibility of the interview for the listening audience depended. The findings from analysis support claims in a considerable body of whiteness studies literature, the main themes of which include the pervasiveness of a racist discourse in Australian media and society, the power of invisible assumptions, and the importance of naming and exposing them. Changes in Pitjantjatjara mourning and burial practices Bill Edwards, University of South Australia This paper is based on observations over a period of more than five decades of changes in Pitjantjatjara burial practices from traditional practices to the introduction of Christian services and cemeteries. Missions have been criticised for enforcing such changes. However, in this instance, the changes were implemented by the Aboriginal people themselves. Following brief outlines of Pitjantjatjara traditional life, including burial practices, and of the establishment of Ernabella Mission in 1937 and its policy of respect for Pitjantjatjara cultural practices and language, the history of these changes which commenced in 1973 are recorded. Previously, deceased bodies were interred according to traditional rites. However, as these practices were increasingly at odds with some of the features of contemporary social, economic and political life, two men who had lost close family members initiated church funeral services and established a cemetery. These practices soon spread to most Pitjantjatjara communities in a manner which illustrates the model of change outlined by Everett Rogers (1962) in Diffusion of Innovations. Reference is made to four more recent funerals to show how these events have been elaborated and have become major social occasions. The world from Malarrak: Depictions of South-east Asian and European subjects in rock art from the Wellington Range, Australia Sally K May, Paul SC Ta�on, Alistair Paterson, Meg Travers This paper investigates contact histories in northern Australia through an analysis of recent rock paintings. Around Australia Aboriginal artists have produced a unique record of their experiences of contact since the earliest encounters with South-east Asian and, later, European visitors and settlers. This rock art archive provides irreplaceable contemporary accounts of Aboriginal attitudes towards, and engagement with, foreigners on their shores. Since 2008 our team has been working to document contact period rock art in north-western and western Arnhem Land. This paper focuses on findings from a site complex known as Malarrak. It includes the most thorough analysis of contact rock art yet undertaken in this area and questions previous interpretations of subject matter and the relationship of particular paintings to historic events. Contact period rock art from Malarrak presents us with an illustrated history of international relationships in this isolated part of the world. It not only reflects the material changes brought about by outside cultural groups but also highlights the active role Aboriginal communities took in responding to these circumstances. Addressing the Arrernte: FJ Gillen?s 1896 Engwura speech Jason Gibson, Australian National University This paper analyses a speech delivered by Francis James Gillen during the opening stages of what is now regarded as one of the most significant ethnographic recording events in Australian history. Gillen?s ?speech? at the 1896 Engwura festival provides a unique insight into the complex personal relationships that early anthropologists had with Aboriginal people. This recently unearthed text, recorded by Walter Baldwin Spencer in his field notebook, demonstrates how Gillen and Spencer sought to establish the parameters of their anthropological enquiry in ways that involved both Arrernte agency and kinship while at the same time invoking the hierarchies of colonial anthropology in Australia. By examining the content of the speech, as it was written down by Spencer, we are also able to reassesses the importance of Gillen to the ethnographic ambitions of the Spencer/Gillen collaboration. The incorporation of fundamental Arrernte concepts and the use of Arrernte words to convey the purpose of their 1896 fieldwork suggest a degree of Arrernte involvement and consent not revealed before. The paper concludes with a discussion of the outcomes of the Engwura festival and the subsequent publication of The Native Tribes of Central Australia within the context of a broader set of relationships that helped to define the emergent field of Australian anthropology at the close of the nineteenth century. One size doesn?t fit all: Experiences of family members of Indigenous gamblers Louise Holdsworth, Helen Breen, Nerilee Hing and Ashley Gordon Centre for Gambling Education and Research, Southern Cross University This study explores help-seeking and help-provision by family members of Indigenous people experiencing gambling problems, a topic that previously has been ignored. Data are analysed from face-to-face interviews with 11 family members of Indigenous Australians who gamble regularly. The results confirm that substantial barriers are faced by Indigenous Australians in accessing formal help services and programs, whether for themselves or a loved one. Informal help from family and friends appears more common. In this study, this informal help includes emotional care, practical support and various forms of ?tough love?. However, these measures are mostly in vain. Participants emphasise that ?one size doesn?t fit all? when it comes to avenues of gambling help for Indigenous peoples. Efforts are needed to identify how Indigenous families and extended families can best provide social and practical support to assist their loved ones to acknowledge and address gambling problems. Western Australia?s Aboriginal heritage regime: Critiques of culture, ethnography, procedure and political economy Nicholas Herriman, La Trobe University Western Australia?s Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 (WA) and the de facto arrangements that have arisen from it constitute a large part of the Aboriginal ?heritage regime? in that state. Although designed ostensibly to protect Aboriginal heritage, the heritage regime has been subjected to various scholarly critiques. Indeed, there is a widespread perception of a need to reform the Act. But on what basis could this proceed? Here I offer an analysis of these critiques, grouped according to their focus on political economy, procedure, ethnography and culture. I outline problems surrounding the first three criticisms and then discuss two versions of the cultural critique. I argue that an extreme version of this criticism is weak and inconsistent with the other three critiques. I conclude that there is room for optimism by pointing to ways in which the heritage regime could provide more beneficial outcomes for Aboriginal people. Read With Me Everyday: Community engagement and English literacy outcomes at Erambie Mission (research report) Lawrence Bamblett Since 2009 Lawrie Bamblett has been working with his community at Erambie Mission on a literacy project called Read With Me. The programs - three have been carried out over the past four years - encourage parents to actively engage with their children?s learning through reading workshops, social media, and the writing and publication of their own stories. Lawrie attributes much of the project?s extraordinary success to the intrinsic character of the Erambie community, not least of which is their communal approach to living and sense of shared responsibility. The forgotten Yuendumu Men?s Museum murals: Shedding new light on the progenitors of the Western Desert Art Movement (research report) Bethune Carmichael and Apolline Kohen In the history of the Western Desert Art Movement, the Papunya School murals are widely acclaimed as the movement?s progenitors. However, in another community, Yuendumu, some 150 kilometres from Papunya, a seminal museum project took place prior to the completion of the Papunya School murals and the production of the first Papunya boards. The Warlpiri men at Yuendumu undertook a ground-breaking project between 1969 and 1971 to build a men?s museum that would not only house ceremonial and traditional artefacts but would also be adorned with murals depicting the Dreamings of each of the Warlpiri groups that had recently settled at Yuendumu. While the murals at Papunya are lost, those at Yuendumu have, against all odds, survived. Having been all but forgotten, this unprecedented cultural and artistic endeavour is only now being fully appreciated. Through the story of the genesis and construction of the Yuendumu Men?s Museum and its extensive murals, this paper demonstrates that the Yuendumu murals significantly contributed to the early development of the Western Desert Art Movement. It is time to acknowledge the role of Warlpiri artists in the history of the movement.

Inscriptions & Markings

b&w photographs, colour photographs

DVD - Urban clan : a portrait of the Page brothers and the Bangarra Dance Theatre

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A documentary portrait of three brothers who together formed the creative core of the Bangarra Dance Theatre. The essence of the Page brothers' story captures an Aboriginal 'dreaming' of three spirits, a storyteller, a song man and a dancer, who through their collective art, build bridges within their own culture and between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

Inscriptions & Markings

DVD

Book - Proof and management of native title : summary of proceedings of a workshop : conducted by the Native Titles Research Unit, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies at University House, Canberra 31 January - 1 February 1994

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Introduction - Jim Fingleton - Outlines history and problem aspects to do with the formulation of the Native Title Act 1993 and subsidiary /? consultative bodies (eg National Native Title Tribunal and Regulations; Native Title Implementation Task Force); Note: Talks &? discussion papers annotated separately by author/?title/?workshop title; SESSION GROUP DISCUSSIONS ONLY annotated here; First Session: Claims - Matters raised in discussion - timing; restraining orders; requirement for claim acceptance; researching claims; disputes; representative bodies; native title /? compensation claims; Second Session: Hearings - "Main matters raised in discussion" - 1.gender issue in hearings; 2.subjective /? objective tests of native title; 3.use of maps; 4.practice directions; 5. mediation; 6. what precision is needed to prove ownership; Third Session: Determinations - "Matters raised in discussion" - 1.what is a community; 2.the legal process for proof of communal title(i-iv); Fourth Session: New Management Regimes - Main matters raised in discussion - 1. need for new development models; 2. need for new administrative models; 3. is self-sufficiency a realistic goal; 4. actve/?passive income; 5. direct funding of Indigenous bodies; 6. towards self-government; Fifth Session: New Management Decisions - Main matters raised in discussion - 1. different models for money management; 2. local government laws and native title; 3. restrictions on the enjoyment of native title rights; 4. need for flexibility in investigating native title; Sixth Session: Conclusions and Recommendations - Papers as requested; discussion; Main New Matters raised by panel in discussion - 1. recommendations from the Aboriginal caucus; 2. requirements for an application; 3. issues for funding; 4. role of representative bodies; 5. double dipping; 6. role of AIATSIS; 7. trustees or agents; 8. land management issues; Annexes: annotated separately under author /? title.

Inscriptions & Markings

tables

Book with DVD - It's a hard road to hoe but you gotta start somewhere : designing a community Language project a resource for Indigenous communities

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

An overview of the total package for a Community Language Program. Explores Deciding to revive the language, training the trainers, gathering information, managing the project, writing an action plan and bring it all together. Is complemented by a DVD on back cover of book.

Inscriptions & Markings

DVD

Book - In other words : souvenir program 2005

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A program from the "In Other Words" Festival, celebrating poets and translators from around Australia and across the world. Features poetry, essays and songs from Jeanie Bell & Vanessa Fisher, Lou Bennet, Ricardo Idagi, and Bruce Pascoe. Works in English and Language.

Inscriptions & Markings

Black and white photographs

Book - Through black eyes : a handbook of family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations, b&w photographs

Periodical - Aboriginal history

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

reproductions of documents, b&w photographs

Book - Documenting and revitalizing Austronesian Languages

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Part 1: International capacity building initiatives, Part 2: Documentation and revitalization Activities, Part 3: Computational methods and tools for language documentation.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maps, b&w photographs, tables

Book - Badtjala - English : English - Badtjala : word list

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Informal publication, spiral bound, with word lists in alphabetical order in a series of categories.

Inscriptions & Markings

Colour photographs, word lists

Book - Australian Aboriginal contact with the English Language in New South Wales : 1788 to 1845

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Early language contacts between Aboriginals and Colonists. Looks at the history of the area and explorationa dn pastoralists.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maps, word lists

Map - Vicmap topographic map index as at June 2000

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Index to Vicmap topographic mapping, including 1:25 000 and 1:50 000 topographic maps, and Outdoor leisure series, compiled by the earlier bodies, Survey &? Mapping Victoria, etc. Also indexes Royal Australian Survey Corps' 1:50 000 topographic mapping.

Inscriptions & Markings

maps

Periodical - Australian Aboriginal studies : journal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

1. Musical and linguistic perspectives on Aboriginal song Allan Marett and Linda Barwick Song brings language and music together. Great singers are at once musicians and wordsmiths, who toss rhythm, melody and word against one another in complex cross-play. In this paper we outline some initial findings that are emerging from our interdisciplinary study of the musical traditions of the Cobourg region of western Arnhem Land, a coastal area situated in the far north of the Australian continent 350 kilometres northeast of Darwin. We focus on a set of songs called Jurtbirrk, sung in Iwaidja, a highly endangered language, whose core speaker base is now located in the community of Minjilang on Croker Island. We bring to bear analytical methodologies from both musicology and linguistics to illuminate this hitherto undocumented genre of love songs. 2. Iwaidja Jurtbirrk songs: Bringing language and music together Linda Barwick (University of Sydney), Bruce Birch and Nicholas Evans (University of Melbourne) Song brings language and music together. Great singers are at once musicians and wordsmiths, who toss rhythm, melody and word against one another in complex cross-play. In this paper we outline some initial findings that are emerging from our interdisciplinary study of the musical traditions of the Cobourg region of western Arnhem Land, a coastal area situated in the far north of the Australian continent 350 kilometres northeast of Darwin. We focus on a set of songs called Jurtbirrk, sung in Iwaidja, a highly endangered language, whose core speaker base is now located in the community of Minjilang on Croker Island. We bring to bear analytical methodologies from both musicology and linguistics to illuminate this hitherto undocumented genre of love songs. 3. Morrdjdjanjno ngan-marnbom story nakka, ?songs that turn me into a story teller?: The morrdjdjanjno of western Arnhem Land Murray Garde (University of Melbourne) Morrdjdjanjno is the name of a song genre from the Arnhem Land plateau in the Top End of the Northern Territory and this paper is a first description of this previously undocumented song tradition. Morrdjdjanjno are songs owned neither by individuals or clans, but are handed down as ?open domain? songs with some singers having knowledge of certain songs unknown to others. Many morrdjdjanjno were once performed as part of animal increase rituals and each song is associated with a particular animal species, especially macropods. Sung only by men, they can be accompanied by clap sticks alone or both clap sticks and didjeridu. First investigations reveal that the song texts are not in everyday speech but include, among other things, totemic referential terms for animals which are exclusive to morrdjdjanjno. Translations from song language into ordinary register speech can often be ?worked up? when the song texts are discussed in their cultural and performance context. The transmission of these songs is severely endangered at present as there are only two known singers remaining both of whom are elderly. 4. Sung and spoken: An analysis of two different versions of a Kun-barlang love song Isabel O?Keeffe (nee Bickerdike) (University of Melbourne) In examining a sung version and a spoken version of a Kun-barlang love song text recorded by Alice Moyle in 1962, I outline the context and overall structure of the song, then provide a detailed comparative analysis of the two versions. I draw some preliminary conclusions about the nature of Kun-barlang song language, particularly in relation to the rhythmic setting of words in song texts and the use of vocables as structural markers. 5. Simplifying musical practice in order to enhance local identity: Rhythmic modes in the Walakandha wangga (Wadeye, Northern Territory) Allan Marett (University of Sydney) Around 1982, senior performers of the Walakandha wangga, a repertory of song and dance from the northern Australian community of Wadeye (Port Keats), made a conscious decision to simplify their complex musical and dance practice in order to strengthen the articulation of a group identity in ceremonial performance. Recordings from the period 1972?82 attest to a rich diversity of rhythmic modes, each of which was associated with a different style of dance. By the mid-1980s, however, this complexity had been significantly reduced. I trace the origin of the original complexity, explore the reasons why this was subsequently reduced, and trace the resultant changes in musical practice. 6. ?Too long, that wangga?: Analysing wangga texts over time Lysbeth Ford (University of Sydney) For the past forty or so years, Daly region song-men have joined with musicologists and linguists to document their wangga songs. This work has revealed a corpus of more than one hundred wangga songs composed in five language varieties Within this corpus are a few wangga texts recorded with their prose versions. I compare sung and spoken texts in an attempt to show not only what makes wangga texts consistently different from prose texts, but also how the most recent wangga texts differ from those composed some forty years ago. 7. Flesh with country: Juxtaposition and minimal contrast in the construction and melodic treatment of jadmi song texts Sally Treloyn (University of Sydney) For some time researchers of Centralian-style songs have found that compositional and performance practices that guide the construction and musical treatment of song texts have a broader social function. Most recently, Barwick has identified an ?aesthetics of parataxis or juxtaposition? in the design of Warumungu song texts and musical organisation (as well as visual arts and dances), that mirrors social values (such as the skin system) and forms 'inductive space' in which relationships between distinct classes of being, places, and groups of persons are established. Here I set out how juxtaposition and minimal contrast in the construction and melodic treatment of jadmi-type junba texts from the north and north-central Kimberley region similarly create 'inductive space' within which living performers, ancestral beings, and the country to which they are attached, are drawn into dynamic, contiguous relationships. 8. The poetics of central Australian Aboriginal song Myfany Turpin (University of Sydney) An often cited feature of traditional songs from Central Australia (CA songs) is the obfuscation of meaning. This arises partly from the difficulties of translation and partly from the difficulties in identifying words in song. The latter is the subject of this paper, where I argue it is a by-product of adhering to the requirements of a highly structured art form. Drawing upon a set of songs from the Arandic language group, I describe the CA song as having three independent obligatory components (text, rhythm and melody) and specify how text is set to rhythm within a rhythmic and a phonological constraint. I show how syllable counting, for the purposes of text setting, reflects a feature of the Arandic sound system. The resultant rhythmic text is then set to melody while adhering to a pattern of text alliteration. 9. Budutthun ratja wiyinymirri: Formal flexibility in the Yol?u manikay tradition and the challenge of recording a complete repertoire Aaron Corn (University of Sydney) with Neparr? a Gumbula (University of Sydney) Among the Yol?u (people) of north-eastern Arnhem Land, manikay (song) series serve as records of sacred relationships between humans, country and ancestors. Their formal structures constitute the overarching order of all ceremonial actions, and their lyrics comprise sacred esoteric lexicons held nowhere else in the Yol?u languages. A consummate knowledge of manikay and its interpenetrability with ancestors, country, and parallel canons of sacred y�ku (names), bu?gul (dances) and miny'tji (designs) is an essential prerequisite to traditional leadership in Yol?u society. Drawing on our recordings of the Baripuy manikay series from 2004 and 2005, we explore the aesthetics and functions of formal flexibility in the manikay tradition. We examine the individuation of lyrical realisations among singers, and the role of rhythmic modes in articulating between luku (root) and bu?gul'mirri (ceremonial) components of repertoire. Our findings will contribute significantly to intercultural understandings of manikay theory and aesthetics, and the centrality of manikay to Yol?u intellectual traditions. 10. Australian Aboriginal song language: So many questions, so little to work with Michael Walsh Review of the questions related to the analysis of Aboriginal song language; requirements for morpheme glossing, component package, interpretations, prose and song text comparison, separation of Indigenous and ethnographic explanations, candour about collection methods, limitations and interpretative origins.

Inscriptions & Markings

maps, colour photographs, tables

Book - Three Sisters dreaming - or did Katoomba get its legend from Kangaroo Valley?

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

Inscriptions & Markings

B&w illustrations, b&w photographs, colour photographs, newspaper articles, maps, word lists

Book - Australian Aboriginal place-names and their meanings

Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, Fitzroy

A short book of Aboriginal place name definitions from around Australia - the state of each name is indicated.

Inscriptions & Markings

word lists