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Vision Australia Kooyong, Victoria

Vision Australia is a leading national provider of blindness and low vision services in Australia. We work in partnership with Australians who are blind or have low vision to help them achieve the possibilities they choose in life. Vision Australia is a not-for-profit organisation with client numbers of 50,000 and we are also a major participant and partner in the international blindness community. We provide services and support for clients through 28 Vision Australia centres in NSW, ACT, Queensland and Victoria. Clinics are also held in 29 other locations and there are outreach services to the Northern Territory and Tasmania.

Contact Information

location
454 Glenferrie Road Kooyong Victoria 3144
phone
+61 1300 847 466

Contact

Opening Hours

By appointment only.

Location

454 Glenferrie Road Kooyong Victoria

The Vision Australia Heritage collection consists of materials created, produced by or awarded to Vision Australia or its historical organisations that document that history of blindness organisations from the 1860's and their impact upon individuals. It has over 10,000 items including photographs, annual reports, tactile art, building plans and programs.

Significance

This unique collection contains materials that provide a significant interpretation of changing social attitudes, items created or used by blind or vision impaired individuals, as well as rare pieces that are the only known examples of this type within Australia.

David Glauser 1 August 2017 10:53 AM

https://victoriancollections.net.au/?q=glauser&view=58d0907cd0d0103314f35dd3 Dear Sirs, We would be most grateful if due credit for this typewriter was also given in this description to my father, Jean Maurice Glauser who in collaboration with Edward Pyke developed this writer. My father's company J M Glauser and Sons Scientific Instruments Ltd worked closely with the Royal Institute for the Blind for many years on this and other aids for the blind and designed this and other equipment. It would be a great shame if my father's contribution to facilitate the quality of life for the blind was not adequately mentioned? The typewriter was acknowledge as a major advance and is even mentioned in the Courier Mail of October 24th 1935 as the first typewriter imported into Queensland for a young blind student named Miss Mercy Griffin who was studying for University and was an accomplished musician. We have further details should you wish of this and other Braille equipment my father designed and manufactured. Your kind consideration of my family's request will be much appreciated. Yours sincerely, David Glauser Perth Western Australia

Vision Australia 8 August 2017 1:50 PM

Thanks David. We have updated records on both the JMG Stenotype and Pyke-Glauser Braille writer to reflect their wonderful heritage. We would love further details on these items. Can you please send us a message at [email protected] .

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1414 items

Artwork - Sydney Industrial Blind Institution

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Watercolour and goucache over pencil in gold frame

Historical information

Side view of a double-storey, sandstone builidng with lawn, most likely the original building designed by Edmund Blacket for the Sydney Industrial Blind Institution in Boomerang Street. The artist has signed and dated the right-hand corner and has written 'Deaf and Dumb'.

Inscriptions & Markings

M Jones

Artwork - Sydney Industrial Blind Institution

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art print in grey/gold frame

Historical information

Print of a painting inspired by the original drawing done by Adam Stephan c1890. A double story sandstone building with a bay window sits behind a metal fence. On the road, driver waits with his horse and buggy as a man and woman stand in the open door to the building.

Artwork - Portrait of Bruce Small

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Bruce Small who was President of the Association for the Blind 1955-1964. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Small stands in his Gold Coast mayoral robes, which consist of a dark blue velvet with ermine trim and a white ruffled shirt.. He wears a mayoral chain of office around his neck and glasses, with his hands clasped in front of him. Sir Bruce Small joined the Vision Australia’s General committee in 1944 and became President of the organisation in 1955. He developed an efficient team with Sir Hubert Opperman (for many years the world’s number one cyclist), whom he brought in as Vice President and Mr. Pat Lightfoot, himself president for many years. Sir Bruce had to leave school at an early age after the death of his father in order to support his family. The lessons he learned from this episode in his life created a man of quick wit, with a razor sharp mind and the skills of a gambler - attributes that enabled him to achieve his goal of “aiming for the stars”. This was put into effect when he proposed a plan for 3 new Vision Australia nursing homes in 5 years at Ballarat, Bendigo and Brighton at a cost, which at that time seemed impossible but which was finally achieved between 1957 and 1959, through astute financial management. Sir Bruce also supported the concept of organisational decentralization and made amendments to the constitution, which enabled the associated branches of the Vision Australia (then the Association for the Advancement of the Blind) to form local committees. This was in order to generate local interest in the blind people in the community and engage them in fund raising and running of the nursing homes. Although he resigned in 1964 when he moved to Queensland he still retained an interest in Vision Australia. Sir Bruce had always pushed for a symbol for Vision Australia which would be recognized by the public and serve a useful purpose. This took the form of a beacon which was erected at Brighton, overlooking the sea, having a twofold purpose – a reference point and guiding light for small craft, and symbolically for blind people a guiding light to direct them to a safe harbour. Sir Bruce switched on the guiding light at in 1969 having already donated the cost of $3000. Prior to joining Vision Australia, Sir Bruce had operated the Malvern Star bicycle business in Glenferrie Rd. He promoted and expanded the business making Malvern Star the industry leader in Australia. This was aided by his friendship with Sir Hubert Oppermen, who promoted Malvern Star bikes through his role as world’s number one cyclist. In 1967 he became Mayor of the Gold Coast and, in 1972 he was elected to the Queensland Parliament representing the seat of Surfers Paradise.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr Bruce Small / President 1955 - 1964 / Association for the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of Tilly Aston

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Tilly Aston who began the Association for the Advancement of the Blind, a forerunner to the Association for the Blind. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Tilly sits with one hand resting against a table, and the other in her lap. She is wearing a black collared dress with a white lace neck ruff held with an opal pin. Two medals (the Jubilee medal and Coronation medal) are pinned to the chest, each consisting of a red and white bowtie with a brass medallion. Tilly Aston was born in Carisbrook, Victoria, in 1873. When she was very young her parents noticed she was having problems with her vision. They took her to a doctor who diagnosed her with no sight in her right eye and the prognosis of loss of vision in the left eye. As a result of this she was totally blind by the age of 7. Despite this her parents endeavoured to give Tilly as many of life’s advantages that their limited means could supply. From an early age she was taught singing, music, poetry, arithmetic, encouraged to read and observe the natural world around her and be independent. At the age of 8 she was sent to the Asylum and School for the Blind (later called the Royal Victorian Institute for the Blind). She excelled in a wide range of subjects and matriculated in 1889. With the help of a public fund was able to attend Melbourne University, being the first blind Australian to do so. Unfortunately the lack of Braille text books made it impossible for Tilly to continue her studies and she left in second year. Tilly was determined that other blind people would not have the same negative experience she had had. In 1894 she organised a meeting to form the Victorian Association of Braille Writers with the aim of producing and supplying Braille to blind Victorians. Braille was produced by trained volunteers with ? recruited in the first six month. Other rights and services for blind people remained very limited. In 1895 Tilly organised a meeting, which formed the Association for the Advancement of the Blind (now Vision Australia). The Association was instrumental in obtaining many benefits for blind people including a blind pension, voting rights and transport concessions. It also established the first nursing homes for blind people, at a time when many blind people were homeless and destitute. Tilly went on to be Australia’s first blind teacher. She was also a very talented musician, author of seven books and was very gifted at arts and crafts. She knew Esperanto and corresponded with people all around the world including Helen Keller. Tilly passed away on November 1st 1947. Her legacy continues through the work Vision Australia which provides services for thousands of blind Australians. A memorial bell dedicated to her is also situated in the King Domain Gardens.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Miss Matilda (Tilly) A. Aston / President 1904, 1910, 1943 to 1947/ Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of Thomas Marks

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Thomas Marks who was President of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind 1900, 1935-1937. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Marks sits at a table, wearing black tails and pants, a white pleated dinner shirt and black evening dress bow-tie. One hand rests next to a cup and saucer, the other rests on his lap. Tom Marks was educated at the Royal Victorian Institute for the Blind. He was a founding member of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind (now Vision Australia) at its establishment in 1895. He went on to serve as President of organisation in 1900 and was later appointed as a part time paid secretary – an office he occupied from 1904 to 1927. He again served as President from 1935 to 1937 during which time he celebrated his 80th birthday. As the living conditions of many blind people were deplorable at this time – they were often confined to a room or shed without any social contacts – it was realized that support for blind persons was needed to serve as a refuge for the oppressed, a home for the indigent, a rest home for the sick and a convalescent home to provide both respite care and permanent accommodation. Mr Marks had a reputiation of having good contacts and being able to use people with more knowledge than himself. An able musician, Tom Marks was often employed in the homes of wealthy families. As a result he met Mr and Mrs Grimwade who were already supporters of Vision Australia. They organized a gymkhana to raise money for the nucleus of a building fund. From this time Tom Marks was involved in the finances of the centres at Brighton, Ballarat and Bendigo, which were the ultimate result of the fund. He was also part of a team that negotiated the financial agreement between the RVIB and Vision Australia over fund raising and the allocation of money, which lasted from 1930 to 1939.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr Thomas Marks / President 1900, 1935-1937/ Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of Diana Jones

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Diana J. Jones who the first female president of the Association for the Blind since Tilly Aston. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mrs Jones sits facing the painter with both hands clasped in her lap. She is wearing a black double breasted blazer, white shirt, blue beaded necklace and earrings and a gold bracelet . A white kerchief sits in her breast pocket. Diana Jones served for 8 years on the General Committee before being elected President. During this time she was deputy chairman of the Reach Out Appeal to raise funds for the building program and President of the Honorary Services Group which co-ordinated volunteers and gave them a spokesperson on the General Committee. In her 8 years as President a great deal was accomplished. New centres were opened or extended throughout Victoria and the Metropolitan area, volunteer services expanded and the Vision Resource Centre at Kooyong was built into which 3RPH radio was relocated. A Vision Information hotline, audiology services and the National Centre for Ageing and Sensory Loss were established, the Braille and Talking Book libraries was incorporated into the Association and the Charlie Bradley Cricket Pavilion opened at Kooyong. In 1990 Diana Jones became a member of the first Board of Directors of the newly incorporated Association for the Blind Ltd which ushered in a new era, requiring strict observance of financial and accounting methods in order to ensure continued Government funding. Mrs Jones was highly regarded by clients, volunteers and staff as a capable hard-working leader. Her services to the Association and over many years to the wider community, were recognised in her appointment as a Member of the Order of Australia in the 1993 Queen's Birthday Honours. She passed away in July 2009.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Dame Diana J. Jones, AM DSJ / President 1984- 1992 / Association for the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of John Wicking

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in old gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of John Wicking who was President of the Association for the Blind 1973-1984 as well as a generous benefactor. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Wicking wears a navy suit, white shirt and navy blue Kiwi tie. John Wicking served as President of Vision Australia from 1973 to 1984 and as Vice President in 1990. He was Managing Director and Chairman of Kiwi International when he was introduced to the Committee in 1971. With a natural air of authority, he was known to be both strong and wise. One of the first hurdles Mr Wicking faced following his election as President in 1973 was understanding the health service system and sorting out the differing views of committee members over recommendations for projects costing hundreds of thousands of dollars with no funds to implement them. The ten years of his Presidency were a time of exceptional growth and expansion. He was instrumental in acquiring an adjacent property to those already owned in Glenferrie Road in 1974 at a cost of $120,000, on which the Low Vision Clinic was erected – the first of its type in Australia. Land was also bought in both the metropolitan and country areas for future expansion. Day care centres were opened in Ballarat and Bendigo and new metropolitan services commenced. Mr Wicking formed a committee to explore the possibility of a radio station people unable to read standard print. As a result 3RPH commenced broadcasting in 1981. Mr Wicking was also involved in the incorporation of Vision Australia under the Companies Act in 1990. After his retirement as President Mr. Wicking continued as a committee member until 1994. In 1995 he was instrumental in the establishment of the Tilly Aston Heritage Collection, on which he served as Chairman until sadly passing away in 2002.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr John O. Wicking AM / President 1973-1984 / Association for the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of George Maxwell

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold/brown frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of George Maxwell who was President of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind 1920-1935. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Maxwell is turned slightly away from the viewer, and wears a blue suit, white high collared shirt and a blue tie. George Maxwell was President of Vision Australia from 1920 to 1935. After an early teaching career he studied law, was admitted to the Bar and became one of Victoria’s great criminal lawyers and later a Federal Member of Parliament. He took an interest the welfare of blind people from his student days. A detached retina in 1920 led to total blindness nine years later, which gave him a great empathy for those with a similar affliction. Through his contacts he was also instrumental in obtaining the first voting rights for blind Australians. Up until 1902 blind people were unable to vote if they couldn’t write with a pen. George Maxwell was working at that time at the legal firm of Strongman and Crouch one of the partners, Mr. Crouch, was elected as a member of Parliament. When the Commonwealth Electoral Bill was being drafted, Mr. Crouch has a clause added enabling blind people to vote in Federal elections, constituting a world first. But perhaps his greatest achievement was obtaining the pension for legally blind people. Until 1910 only those who met the age and means test criteria were eligible. With the help of his legal and political friends a bill was passed which granted the pension to all persons over 16 years of age who were unable to work due to physical disability or blindness. Until this time these people had to be supported by their families or go to a benevolent institution. This was a world first and gave to blind and vision impaired people a measure of independence which increased both their self reliance and self esteem.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Honourable George A Maxwell Q.C. / President 1920-1935 / Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Artwork - Sydney Industrial Blind Institution in William Street

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 water colour in beige frame

Historical information

Watercolour by Lin Ditchfield of the Royal Blind Society of New South Wales (formerly the Sydney Industrial Blind Institution) in William Street, Sydney. Built in 1880, the Edmund Blacket designed building was eventually sold in 1971. Located on the corner of William Street and Boomerang Place, the site was keenly sought by developers as the city landscape transformed into high rise office builidings, as evidenced in the background of this painting.

Inscriptions & Markings

Lin Ditchfield 1971

Artwork - Portrait of Elsie Henderson

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold/brown frame with printed description

Historical information

Framed portrait of Elsie Henderson who was a tireless worker for the Association for the Blind. From 1934 until the 1960s Elsie Henderson worked at the Association for the Blind as a home visitor for women who were blind or vision impaired. Blind herself, Ms Henderson had 300 women on her visitation list and would visit three to four women daily. She wears a mid-blue jacket with a floral shirt, pearl necklace and her MBE attached to her jacket. This painting hung in the former Kooyong Day Centre until it was demolished in 1999.

Artwork - Sydney Industrial Blind Institution

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Oil painting

Historical information

This oil painting of the Sydney Industrial Blind Institution (later Royal Blind Society of New South Wales) at William Street was painted by F.R. Fowler in 1976. It was inspired by an original etching. The building was erected between 1876 and 1879 and was designed by Edmund Blacket. It was funded through a generous bequest by John William Wood. The Institution provided the first employment training in NSW for people who were blind or vision impaired.

Inscriptions & Markings

The Sydney Industrial Blind Institution 1879

Artwork - Portrait of John Moule

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in old gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of John Moule who was President of the Vision Australia Foundation, from 1992-1999. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Moule is standing with his arm on a dresser, and holds a pair of glasses. He is dressed in a navy blue suit, with a blue kercheif in his breast pocket,, a white collared shirt and a blue, white and black striped tie. On his lapel is a small gold badge. The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr John A. Moule AM / President 1992-1999 / Vision Australia Foundation'.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr John A. Moule AM / President 1992-1999 / Vision Australia Foundation'.

Artwork - Portrait of William Patterson

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

aFramed portrait of William Paterson who was President of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind, from 1948-1952. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Paterson is dressed in a 3 piece gray suit, white shirt and wearing a blue tie and black hat. He sits outside a house reading a red coloured book, whilst in the background an elderly man takes a step out on to the gravelled driveway. Two women, one with a white cane, rest on chairs under the verendah of the building. The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr William H. Paterson / President 1948-1952 / Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr William H. Paterson / President 1948-1952 / Association for Advancement of the Blind'

Artwork - Portrait of David Robertson

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of David Robertson who was the first President of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind, from 1895-1899. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Robertson sits with his hands resting upon a wooden cane. He is wearing dark spectacles, a gray suit and waistcoat, white shirt with starched collar and pleated front, and a red and blue striped necktie. On his left lapel is a blue and red medal. David Robertson was educated at the Royal Victorian Institute for the Blind and was trained as a basket maker. He was one of eight foundation members of the Association for the Advancement of the Blind (now Vision Australia Foundation ) which was formed in 1895 in order to encourage blind people to manage their own affairs and build their self esteem. He was appointed the inaugural president and served as such from 1895 to 1899 and again in 1913 as well as acting as vice president from 1900 to 1902 and in 1911 and 1915. Known as a level headed and wise peacemaker he was elected chairman of the first interstate conference of blind people, which took place in Melbourne in 1913. From this evolved the Federal Council of Organizations of the Blind, which undertook to consider all matters affecting blind people.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'David Robertson / Inaugural President of / Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of William Quayle

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in brown frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of William Quayle who was President of the Association for the Blind in 1905. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Quayle sits on a wooden chair, wearing a gray three piece suit, white shirt and black bowtie. A small pink flower sits in his lapel and the chain from a fob watch is tucked into his waistcoat. Mr Quayle was born on the Isle of Mann, and the Manx Society of Victoria made a donation towards this painting, which was unveiled by his granddaughter. Coral Graham lent family portraits for the artist to construct this likeness.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr William Quayle / President 1905 / Association for Advancement of the Blind'.

Artwork - Portrait of Malcolm Daubney

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in old gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Malcolm Daubney who was President of Vision Australia Foundation 1999-2002. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB/VAF Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Daubney wears a navy suit, pale blue shirt and navy blue Kiwi tie. Mr Malcolm Daubney has worked closely with blind and vision impaired people for many years. In the 1980s Mr Daubney was “volunteered” by John Wicking to the Vision Australia’s Kooyong Committee. Shortly after his appointment he was posted to Singapore for business, where he served on the committee of the Singapore Association for the Blind for five years. Upon his return he rejoined the Kooyong Branch Committee. Later he was appointed to the Vision Australia Board of which he was President from 1999 to 2002, and then Chief Executive Officer from 2002-2005.

Inscriptions & Markings

The plaque at the base of the painting reads 'Mr Malcolm Daubney / President 1999-2002 / Vision Australia Foundation'.

Artwork - Portrait of Pat Lightfoot

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 art original in gold frame

Historical information

Framed portrait of Howard (Pat) M. Lightfoot, who was the President of the Association for the Blind in 1952-1954 and 1964-1972 respectively. It is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the AFB Board to commemorate the work of past presidents of the organisation. Mr Lightfoot is seated, with his hands clasped, and wears a gray jacket, grey collared shirt, green woolen vest and red tie. There is a name plate attached at the base of the painting with his name and dates of appointment. Signed by the artist in the lower, right-hand corner.

Inscriptions & Markings

Mr Howard (Pat) M. Lightfoot OBE President 1952-54, 1964-72 Association for the Blind

Image - H & L Hecht Trust

Vision Australia, Kooyong

2 black and white photographs with central panel of text in grey frame

Historical information

Portrait of Hans and Letitia Hecht with a description of the Trust they founded. Between them is a page outlining the work of the Trust they established. The description reads: "H. & L. Hecht Trust. Thanks for Sharing Our Vision. The Association for the Blind thanks the H. & L. Hecht Trust for their generous support of our Western Metropolitan Regional Low Vision Clinic. The trust was established by the late Hans Hecht, an immigrant from Germany who arrived in Australia in 1900. He married Letitia Robinson in 1911. A successful importer and manufacturer, he set up the H. & L. Hecht Trust to give something back to the community for the help he and his wife had received. Hans Hecht died in Melbourne in 1965, aged 84. Letitia died two years later aged 87. Their kindness lives on in the support which their trust has given for the work of the Association for the Blind through their trustees: Mr D W Rogers, Sir Peter Derham, Perpetual Trustees Victoria Limited."

Image - Framed prints - MacFarlane

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Images of 2 framed prints of "The Fox Hunt" and "The Preparatives"

Historical information

In memory of auxiliary members who had passed away, gifts were sometimes presented to the RVIB for use in the office or sale to raise funds. In this example, two prints from a fox hunting collection were made in memorium of Margaret MacFarlane, who was a foundation member of the Alberta Auxiliary and the Executive Council of Auxiliaries for RVIB.

Inscriptions & Markings

Presented by Alberta Auxiliary in memory of Miss Margaret MacFarlane foundation member of Alberta Auxiliary member of Executive Council of Auxiliaries and esteemed and loyal member of R.V.I.B. Auxiliary movement 16/3/1987.

Image - River Run Female Winner trophy

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Image of award

Historical information

A race along the banks of the Yarra River (?) this trophy was awarded to the female winners from 1978-1987. A golden running figure sits atop a pedestal that rests on a bell located above two pedestals behind a golden laurel wreath. Two eagles, with wings outstretched as if just landing, are either side of the wreath and the inscription 'Rotary Club of Glenferrie - River Run - Female winner - Donated by Bob Bruner' is written on the plinth below them. On the base plinth are inscribed the names of the previous winners: 1978 Lynne Williams 1979 Lynne Williams 1980 Lynne Williams 1981 Dorothy Browne 1982 Dorothy Browne 1983 Michelle Baumgarten 1984 Laura Dess 1985 Mary Edwards 1986 Julie McKie 1987 Julie McKie

Inscriptions & Markings

Rotary Club of Glenferrie River Run Female Winner Donated by Bob Bruner

Image - Association for the Blind offices in Kooyong aerial view

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Photograph in white frame

Historical information

Aerial view of Kooyong. The Kooyong Tennis Centre, Glenferrie Road, train station, Talbot Crescent, Monash Freeway and parklands are clearly visible. Few trees are lining the roadway around the sporting fields, the Glenferrie Road building has not expanded and the Blind Cricket pavilion is not yet built.

Image - Photograph of John Olson

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Photograph in frame

Historical information

The Queensland Musical, Literary and Self Aid Society for the Blind was established on 13 March, 1917. Many children who were blind and who had studied music with Mr Hebert Leon Newman at the 'Queensland Blind, Deaf and Dumb Institution wished to continue after leaving school but could not afford to do so. Mr Olsen, the librarian, who was blind, conceived the formation of a Society to meet this need as well as providing an after work social centre and to address the limited job opportunities available for adults who were blind. The committee of the Blind Deaf and Dumb Institution encouraged the new Society by providing a grand piano and seating accommodation for 100 people in their library. In 1921 he established the John Olsen Literary Competition, then became the Edwin Dickinson Literary Competition and later the Vision Australia Dickinson Literary Awards.

Inscriptions & Markings

John Olson Founder Queensland Musical, Literary & Self-Aid Society for the Blind President 1919-1926 Died 9th Jan 1926

Image - Photograph of May Harrison

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Photograph in frame

Historical information

Sephia-toned photograph of May D. Harrison from the shoulders upwards. Nameplate at base of photograph reads 'May D. Harrison / First / Hon. Secretary & Librarian / 1894-1912'. Mrs Harrison looks to the right of the frame, and is wearing a dress with gathered bodice, puffed sleeves and lace neckline. Her small drop earrings are visible, as her hair is swept up, with two brooches on the bodice and neckline. A length of chain is worn around her neck, although its base remains out of shot. May Harrison was one of the first Braille transcribers trained by Tilly Aston and undertook the position of Honorary Secretary at the formation of the Victorian Association of Braille Writers (VABW) in 1894. Offering use of a room in her home in St Kilda for the storage of Braille books, she became the first librarian for the VABW. Mrs Harrison also taught Braille to other participants and her house became a meeting point for readers and transcribers alike. Her death in 1912 was greatly mourned, and a Memorial Fund set up in her honour, as well as a grave marker and tablet at the Braille library. Her niece Minnie Crabbe, who assisted her work, assumed the role of librarian after Mrs Harrison's death. Inscribed in the lower right 'J O'S & Co, Melbourne'.

Image - Portrait of Matilda (Tilly) Aston

Vision Australia, Kooyong

B/W photograph in black frame

Historical information

Framed black and white photograph of Tilly Aston. Tilly sits with one hand resting against a table, and the other in her lap. She is wearing a black collared dress with a white lace neck ruff held with an opal pin. Two medals (the Jubilee medal and Coronation medal) are pinned to the chest (one a red bowtie, the other is a brass medallion). At the base is a handwritten inscription: Miss Tilly Aston/ Founder of Assocation for Advancement of the Blind / in 1895 and Leader until 1947.

Image - Association for the Blind offices in Kooyong aerial view

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Photograph in brown frame

Historical information

Aerial view of Kooyong. The Kooyong Tennis Centre, Glenferrie Road, train station, Talbot Crescent, Monash Freeway and parklands are clearly visible. Few trees are lining the roadway around the sporting fields, the Glenferrie Road building has not expanded and the Blind Cricket pavilion is not yet built.

Image - Aerial view of Elanora Nursing Home

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Photograph mounted on board

Historical information

Aerial view of Elanora Nursing Home. Mair Street and the train line are clearly visible.

Image - Queensland Foundation for Blind People opening

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Wooden board with nameplate attached

Historical information

Commemorative plaque for the opening of the Kent Street building in 1997.

Inscriptions & Markings

This plaque was unveiled by Her Excellency The Governor of Queensland Leneen Forde, AC to mark the official opening of the new premises for the Queensland Foundation for Blind People Inc Kent St, Annersley on 1st July 1997

Image - Isaac Dickson nameplate

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Metal board

Historical information

Commemorative plaque for the longest superintendent at the Queensland Blind, Deaf and Dumb Institution in Dutton Park.

Inscriptions & Markings

Isaac Dickson Superintendent 1888-1932

Image - Mrs James Angus

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Metal board

Historical information

Commemorative plaque for Mrs James Angus, who was the inaugural Combined Auxiliary President from 1927-1930.

Inscriptions & Markings

To the Memory of Mrs James Angus President of the Combined Auxiliaries 1927-1930 Erected by The Board of Management of the R.V.I.B. and Members of its Auxiliaries

Image - Helen M Schutt trust plaque

Vision Australia, Kooyong

Metal plate attached to wooden plaque

Historical information

Commemorative plaque for the funding of the Master Tape area by the Helen M. Schutt Trust. As an audio library, master tapes were created so that titles could be duplicated multiple times. Preserving these master tapes required a temperature controlled environment and minimal dust or dirt.

Inscriptions & Markings

This Master Tape area was funded by the Helen M. Schutt Trust (followed by brailled version of above)