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Souvenir confectionery bowl

From the Collection of Melbourne Water 990 La Trobe Street Docklands Victoria

Description
Clear glass flower shaped 'depression ware' confectionery bowl, with photographic image of Maroondah Reservoir outlet tower on base
Size
12cm diameter 4cm height
Object Registration
mwh02025
Keywords
melbourne metropolitan board of works, mmbw, maroondah reservoir, melbourne water, scenic view, souvenir, glass bowl
Historical information

Melbourne Water inherited many of its water assets, such as reservoirs from its predecessor the Melbourne Metropolitan Board of Works (MMBW). They have served the organisation well and have long been celebrated for both their natural beauty and engineering ingenuity.

In the nineteenth century Victoria’s fundamental need for water infrastructure went beyond merely functional solutions and reflected the English ideal of the romance and beauty that was embodied in expanses of water. The MMBW further enhanced this notion by incorporating beauty and function in to the Classical and Italianate designs of its infrastructure such as pumping houses and reservoir outlet towers.

The reservoir gardens and picnic areas were landscaped with ornamental stonework, exotic trees, decorative flower beds, fern glades pools and rose gardens.

All features of the water supply system became widely celebrated as beauty spots that continue to be very popular to this day with tourists and locals alike. This souvenir is a product of that flourishing tourist trade. These water supply sites continue to enhance Melbourne’s charm and liveability and are now recognised as places of cultural and historic significance.
When Made
1930s-40s
Significance

This souvenir item has been curated by Melbourne Water as it represents an important historical aspect of the organisation by demonstrating the popularity of its water asset sites as recreational places and tourist attractions, and although these sites are functional parts of the water supply system, they were also designed to be enjoyed by the public both aesthetically and recreationally.
Last updated
3 Mar 2017 at 10:11AM