Historical information

'Hepburn Pool is a forgotten treasure which many visitors to Hepburn Springs would never be aware of. The owners of the Bellinzona Grange hotel explained that it was once the hotel pool and was built in the 1930's. You can find it behind this hotel, downhill at a street called The Pool Way. Steps and a ramp continue down to the pool itself and the secluded park around it. It was built into Spring Creek and became a competition pool for state swimming championships. A concrete weir separates a shallow children's pool from the main pool. You can still see the numbers of each lane painted on the walls at the deep end. There are plenty of seats and a barbeque area. A sign says this is a sacred aboriginal spot and you can certainly feel something magical about the place. I wouldn't suggest swimming in the former pool, it looks rather murky now.' Review of Hepburn Pool by 'Jolyon67' on 'Tripadvisor', 3 June 2015

Significance

'The Bunji: The Bunjil sculpture emerged from discussions with local indigneous Elders, as a dreamtime totem to the Sacred Pool at Hepburn Springs. The original idea was to create the 3 totems of the area...the Bunjil, The Crow and The Bat. Russell applied for, a council grant of $3,000 to design, create and install the Bunjil Sculpture to overlook the pool and reflect its powerful image in the water.' Information provided by Russell Petherbridge, December 2015

Physical description

Large scale steel sculpture depicting 'Bunjil', the dreamtime totem of the Hepburn Pool, an eagle in flight.

References