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Australian Gliding Museum Parwan, Victoria

The Australian Gliding Museum – Preserving Australia’s Gliding History

The Australian Gliding Museum first met as a committee on 26 February 1999. This brought together a number of kindred spirits interested in preserving older and historic gliders. The Museum membership now exceeds 140.

The Museum has since collected gliders from around Australia, many of which were facing neglect or destruction. The Museum’s collection includes over 40 historic gliders and other gliding archival material, including books, manuals, photographs, films, glider launching winches, aircraft plans, trophies and other memorabilia.
Restoration programs are in place (some completed) for many of the gliders collected. These programs are supplemented by research into, recording and display of, the history of gliding in Australia based substantially on the extensive archival material held by and available to the Museum.
Volunteers meet regularly at the Museum’s facilities at Bacchus Marsh airfield (which includes the Bruce Brockhoff Hangar (named after its patron) and Dave Darbyshire restoration workshop (named after one of its founders)). Visitors are welcome on open days or by appointment.
The Museum enjoys the support of the gliding clubs at Bacchus Marsh and the gliding movement in general through the Gliding Federation of Australia.

Contact Information

location
C/- G.Barton, Unit 48 2 Carramar Avenue Mount Waverley Victoria 3150
phone
+61 0407 773 872

Contact

Opening Hours

By appointment – contact President David Goldsmith 03 5428 3358 or Secretary Graeme Barton 0407 773 872

Entry Fee

None – donations accepted

Location

20 Jensz Road Parwan Victoria

This collection results from the special interests of a group which first met as a committee on February 26th 1999. The group, later constituted as The Australian Gliding Museum, shares an interest in researching and preserving older and historic gliders that are scattered all over Australia, with the aim to collect them in a safe place before they become destroyed or deteriorate beyond sensible refurbishment. By 2012, the collection included 14 heritage gliders: Coogee, ES 50 “Club Two Seater”, Flying Plank, Hutter H17, Lessing Glider, LO 150, Northrop Primary, Olympia, Rhon Ranger, Schreder HP-14T, Schweizer TG3a, Skylark 4, T31b “Tandem Tutor”, and a Slingsby T35 Austral, together with other gliding paraphernalia. During the period 2006-2010, the museum constructed three replicas of the biplane glider built by George Augustine Taylor and first flown 5 December 1909. One of these gliders was presented to the National Museum of Australia, for display in its entrance foyer.

Significance

The collection documents early developments in recreational gliding in Australia.

Max Speedy 30 April 2016 12:31 PM

Good morning, Gentlemen and Ladies, I am the president of South Gippsland Gliding Club. My question is that we have two Schleicher K7s whose canopies, front and rear, are in poor shape and in need of replacement. I notice you have in your collection a K7, (ex-VH-GNX). While I don't want its canopies, do you have or know the whereabouts of any canopy moulds so we can keep our K7s in the air? A very important question for us and your assistance would be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Max Speedy 03 5668 1387

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Glider – Sailplane – Vogt LO-150 - Vogt LO-150 – Registered as VH-GUC

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Single seat competition sailplane of wood construction.

Historical information

The LO150 is a sailplane first produced in 1954. Designed in Germany by Alfred Vogt, the LO150 is of all wood construction. It has a two piece wing of 15 metre (49 feet) span and a fuselage of monocoque design. The LO150 is development of the 10 metre (33 feet) span LO100 which is one of the few fully aerobatic sailplanes in the world. The LO150 is in the semi-aerobatic category. The first of the type to be imported into Australia arrived in late 1955. In January 1956 this aircraft was used to create a world speed record of just under 75 km/h for speed around a 300 km triangle and went on to win the Australian National Gliding Championships. The Museum’s LO150 (VH-GUC) – serial number EB71 was imported from Germany in 1971 by the late Frank Erdmann and an ownership syndicate formed. Over the years J. Buchanan, N.L. Lovell and Partners and W.S. Mayfield have held ownership interests in the glider. No history of the glider prior to its arrival in Australia is known. Its first flight in Australia was on 6 February 1971 at Bacchus Marsh when a test flight of 35 minutes was conducted by way of aerotow by Doug Vanston. On the same day another 3 flights totaling 2 hours 55 minutes were conducted at Bacchus Marsh. Shortly after its initial testing VH-GUC was transported to Horsham for the annual competition there and from 7 flights over the forthcoming days it averaged just on 4 hours per flight. Local flying continued at Bacchus Marsh on a sporadic basis until December 1972 – January 1973 when the glider was flown at the National gliding competition at Waikerie in South Australia. Some 17 flights were undertaken there in VH-GUC for a total flight time of 34 hours 33 minutes covering cross country courses of 1366 km. From 1974 to 1978 the glider was flown regularly. It appeared that the annual Horsham gliding competitions each of those years and performed well. It was awarded first place in the Sports Class on day one of competition in February 1978. Over the following years the glider was flown on a sporadic basis until its last logged flight of 1 hour 15 minutes on 3 January 1988. The log for the glider indicates that, since arriving in Australia, it has flown 315 hours from 273 launches, which is a commendable average performance of over an hour per flight. VH-GUC was donated to the Museum by Warren Mayfield in 2002. Substantial glue deterioration was discovered in one wing and, as a result, a decision has been made not to restore the glider to an airworthy condition. In due course the glider will be repainted and further prepared for display.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Registered as VH-GUC

Glider – Sailplane – Slingsby T35 Austral - Slingsby T35 Austral – registration VH-GFX

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Two seat high wing wood and fabric glider – sailplane. The glider has been partly restored for display as a non-flying exhibit.

Historical information

The T35 Austral was developed by Slingsby Aviation from the Slingsby T31 with the wing span increased and a larger rudder to improve performance. This was done in response to an order from an Australian gliding club. The Museum’s glider was built from a Slingsby kit imported from the UK in 1952 and assembled by the Waikerie Gliding Club. The glider came on the Australian register as VH-GFX in May 1956. It was later transferred to the Renmark Gliding Club. In 1968 it was acquired by the RAAF Gliding Club at Laverton, Victoria. The existing log book records for the Museum’s T35 Austral are incomplete. Nevertheless the information at hand shows that it was launched over 17000 times and spent about 2400 hours in the air. It would appear that the glider has not been used for many years, the last flight recorded by the RAAF Gliding Club for this aircraft being in September 1971. As far as is known VH-GFX is the only example of the type to be built.

Significance

To be assessed.

Glider – “Northrop” Zogling type primary - The “Davies, Darbyshire, Feil, Primary Glider”

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The Davies, Darbyshire, Feil, Primary glider consists of an open (uncovered) wooden framed fuselage (painted blue) with a brown vinyl covered seat, fabric covered wooden framed wings of constant chord (painted silver) with provision for attachment of semi-circular cane wing skids, and fabric covered wooden framed tailplane, elevators and rudder (painted silver). When assembled the airframe is wire braced.

Historical information

The “Northrop” is an American copy of the “Zogling” which was designed in Germany in the 1920s as a training glider. Apparently, the Northrop primary glider takes its name from a Marvin Northrop of Minneapolis who imported a Zogling from Germany and from that glider had plans drawn and published in a magazine called Modern Mechanics in 1930. The Australia Gliding Museum’s Northrop, known as the “Davies, Darbyshire, Feil, Primary Glider”, was built over the period of 1970 to 1974. The project was conceived by a pioneer of Australian gliding, Ken Davies, about 1969, as a hobby project and to experience afresh gliding flight of the early years. By that time, few primary gliders, which performed a fundamental role for gliding clubs in the 1930s and 1940s, remained in Australia. Ken began construction and was helped to finish the project by two old time Gliding Club of Victoria members, Dave Darbyshire and Rudi Feil. The glider was test flown on 8 March 1975 at Benalla. The glider was stored at the Gliding Club of Victoria and flown on special occasions in the 1980s. Later it was damaged at the 1996 vintage glider rally at Ararat as a result of a heavy landing. Storage was then provided for the glider by the Victorian Motorless Flight Group at Bacchus Marsh until it was returned to Dave Darbyshire for restoration in 1998. Fully restored, the glider was donated by Iris Davies and Dave Darbyshire to the Australian Gliding Museum in April 2001.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

None

Glider – Sailplane – Schreder HP-14T - Schreder HP-14T – Registration VH-GIB

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

All metal single seat glider sailplane

Historical information

The Schreder HP 14T is a variant of an all metal single seat sailplane designed by Richard Schreder of USA in the 1960s. The HP14T featured an 18 metre ‘C’ wing and a ‘T’ tail in place of the Wortmann section wing and ‘V’ tail of the HP14. The design was marketed to home builders in kit form. However Slingsby Aviation in the UK produced three HP14s with a conventional tail arrangement. The Museum’s Schreder HP14T (VH-GIB) first flew on 31 August 1974. It has recorded 280 hours in the air from 239 launches to 28 January 1989, the date of its last flight. It is understood that VH-GIB was partly constructed in North America and completed in South Australia by C.G.M. Coxon. Ownership passed to the Georgeson Syndicate of Rockhamption, Queensland and later to Warren Mayfield of Victoria. Warren Mayfield donated the glider to the Museum in April 2002. Another Schreder HP14 (a ‘V’ tail type), registered as VH-GGB, was built in South Australia by Harry Bache of the Waikerie Gliding Club in 1975. As at December 2014, it is understood that VH-GGB is owned by a member of the Geelong Gliding Club in the Bacchus Marsh area.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Registration lettering on rudder and fuselage sides

Glider – Sailplane – Schneider ES49 - Schneider ES49 – Registration VH-GLL

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Wooden and fabric covered two seat sailplane.

Historical information

The ES49 glider / sailplane was designed by Edmund Schneider in Germany before he migrated to Australia in the early 1950s. In Germany the ES49 was put into limited production by the Schleicher factory from 1951 to 1953 (8 produced). In Australia the ES49 is commonly referred to as the “Wallaby”; two were built by the Adelaide Soaring Club with assistance from Edmund Schneider Ltd and one independently from plans by Eric Hader and members of the Cooma Gliding Club. The Museum’s ES49 – serial number GFA-HB-36 - was built at Gawler from 1955 to 1958 and registered as VH-GLL on 15 January 1959. It was the second of the ES49s built by the Adelaide Soaring Club. Originally it had a rather distinctive appearance due to the use of a sleek P51 Mustang canopy to enclose the forward seating position of the cockpit. The glider, together with its sister VH-GDK, was used at the Gliding Federation of Australia National Gliding Schools at Gawler. In 1964 the glider was transferred to the Newcastle Gliding Club, Newcastle, in New South Wales and then in 1966 it went to the Albury and District Gliding Club, Albury, New South Wales. The Snowy Mountains Gliding Club, Khancoban, New South Wales acquired the glider in 1968 where it remained until 1974. In 1974 the glider transferred into private hands at Wodonga, Victoria, for two years and then to interests at Albury until 1985. At that stage the glider was acquired by a private owner at Bathurst, New South Wales, who undertook a restoration that included, amongst other work, the fitting of a more conventional cockpit canopy. The glider was at Warkworth, New South Wales in 1992 and became to be owned by Eric Oates who preserved it until he donated it to the Australian Gliding Museum. According to the logbook for VH-GLL held by the Museum, the glider was last flown in November 1990 and at that time had logged 2758 hours and 57 minutes from 15775 launches. The fuselage is currently under restoration at the Museum’s Dave Darbyshire workshop.

Significance

The ES49 – VH-GLL – is an example of the state of wood and fabric dual place sailplane design in the late 1940s. The glider served the Adelaide Soaring Club and subsequent owners well as a training and general purpose sailplane over many years. It is a rare example of the type (one of 4 existing in the world).

Glider – Sailplane - Hall Cherokee II - Hall Cherokee II

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The Cherokee is a single seat wooden home built glider. The glider is constructed from wood, plywood, fabric and metal fittings, all commercial grade except for main wing fittings, pulleys, cables and bolts. The fuselage is simple with four main longerons and bulkheads with diagonal bracing. The wing has two identical solid spars which form a geodetic structure, hence the leading edge is non-structural.

Historical information

The Hall Cherokee II glider is an American design for amateur construction from plans. The designer was Stan Hall (1915-2009), a professional engineer, who gained extensive experience in the United States aviation industry during World War 2 including the programs for military gliders. He continued to work as an engineer for aircraft manufacturers and as a consultant to the industry after the war. He was active in gliding and, in particular, the home built sailplane movement. The Cherokee II was one of about 10 glider designs that he produced: it came out in 1956. It is understood that over 100 Cherokee gliders have been built. In Australia the number is possibly 10 or 11. The Hall Cherokee VH-GVO was built by R.D Meares of Caringbah, New South Wales, and was owned the R.D. Meares syndicate made up of A. Jamieson, M. Vitek, H. Whalen, A. Palmer and G. Dunlop, all from around Sydney. It apparently passed to a second syndicate [names not recorded] and then to Barry Leverton of Peat Ridge, New South Wales and Eric Oats of Wahroonga, New South Wales in succession. Eric donated the glider to the Australian Gliding Museum in December 2009. The glider was registered as VH-GVO on 11 October 1973 and given serial number “GFA-HB-82” by the Gliding Federation of Australia. The Logbook for VH-GVO appears to be a complete record of the flying history; in aggregate 210 hours 40 minutes in the air from 331 flights. The first test hop occurred on 29 July 1972 at Camden, where it was probably based for some time. It was also taken on excursion to Forbes (December 1972 / January 1973), Greenthorpe (April 1974), Narromine (December 1974). It is understood that VH-GVO was also flown at the Hunter Valley Gliding Club near Warkworth New South Wales. VH-GVO was last flown on 22 July 1986. Many of the flights recorded are of one or two hours duration. A ‘Silver C’ flight of 5 hours 25 minutes was made at Narromine in VH-GVO on 14 January 1975 by Gordon [surname not recorded but possibly Dunlop]. The glider was inspected and certified as airworthy and in a reasonable condition by Dieter Hildenbrand at the Hunter Valley Gliding Club in July 1986. Since that time, until transferred to the Australian Gliding Museum, the glider was in storage. Structural restoration work has been completed on the fuselage and one wing. However, inspection of the other wing revealed extensive rodent damage to the ribs and spars and consequently a decision was taken to make it a static exhibit.

Significance

The exhibit is an example of home built construction of a type that has proved popular amongst amateur glider builders.

Inscriptions & Markings

Registration VH-GVO – serial number GFA-HB-82

Glider – Lilienthal Replica - Lilienthal Maihohe Rhinow Glider 1893

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Hang glider made of wood with wire bracing – yet to be covered with authentic cotton fabric.

Historical information

Otto Lilienthal (1848-1896) from Berlin, Germany, is widely credited as being the first person to make repeated successful gliding flights. He was known for adopting a thorough scientific approach founded on observations of the flight of birds in relation to the problem of inventing a man carrying heavier than air machine that would fly. He developed and tested bird-like gliders controlled by weight shift by the pilot (a similar method to modern hang gliders). The pilot held on to the glider with his forearms resting in hoops mounted on the main structural beam connecting the wings. The weight shift was achieved by the pilot swinging his trunk and legs. In contrast, the pilot of a modern hang glider is suspended below the glider and, with the use of an A-frame, allows the whole body to be moved around to achieve control. The Lilienthal design apparently had a tendency to pitch down and a tailplane was added to mitigate this problem. Lilienthal flew from hills in the Rhinow region and from a conical hill he built near Berlin. He made over 2000 flights. Importantly, for others seeking to progress manned flight at the time and also for the historical record, reports of Lilienthal’s flights (some with photographs) were published and Lilienthal detailed his experiences and corresponded with other flight pioneers. Lilienthal’s work became well known and influenced Orville and Wilbur Wright in their initial experiments with gliders in 1899 (although in their quest to design and fly an aeroplane they relied on new data created by wind tunnel testing). The replica built by Bruce Hearn is of the 1893 Lilienthal glider. It is very similar to the “Normal-Segalapparat” (Normal Glider) for which patent protection was later granted a few years later.

Significance

The Lilienthal replica glider is an important addition to the AGM collection as it represents the beginning of successful gliding flight.

Inscriptions & Markings

The glider has a small plate with identification details including name of builder (Bruce Hearn)

Plans – Larkin Aircraft Supply Co. Ltd ‘Lark’ glider -sailplane - Lark Glider Sailplane

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The plans consists of technical drawings on blueprint paper of the glider sailplane designed William Shackleton and built by the Larkin Aircraft Supply Co of Melbourne in 1930.

Historical information

The Lark glider sailplane was designed by William Shackleton in 1930 to meet the perceived demand for a glider with better performance than primary gliders, in Australia. Shackleton came to work for the Larkin Aircraft Supply Co Ltd as its Chief Engineer and designer in 1929 having been with the Beardmore aircraft company in the United Kingdom. The Lark first flew in January 1931 at Coode Island (the site of the Larkin operations and airfield in Melbourne). It was flown at Tower Hill near Koroit in the Western district of Victoria by Raymond Garrett who made a record breaking soaring flight of 1 hour 54 minutes on 19 May 1931. It was later transferred to the local gliding club and flown successfully until it was damaged beyond repair in a crash in 1933. Plans were sold by Larkin Aircraft Co Ltd for home built construction. A second Lark glider was built from plans by Harold Bradley in South Australia. He modified the wing design by tapering the tips. A third Lark derivative was built in northern NSW and flown by Eric Avery and others at Lismore. It had a modified wing with double struts.

Significance

Although there were only three known gliders of this type made and flown, the plans are of historical significance because it was the first successful Australian designed and built utility glider. The associations with the Larkin Aircraft Supply Co Ltd, a pioneering aircraft manufacturer and the notable aircraft designer of the time William Shackleton are also add weight to significance.

Glider – Sailplane –EPB 1 Tailless

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Single seat tailless glider with wing tip rudders. Canopy is missing. The glider is of wood / fabric construction and is unpainted except for primer.

Historical information

The aircraft was built in 1957 by Cliff Brown. It is an EPB 1, a 26 foot tailless sailplane designed in United States by Al Backstrom, Phil Easley and Jack Powell in 1954 as a simple, cheap, compact craft.

Significance

A small number of single seat gliders of this type were built in Australia in the 1950s. As far as is presently known, the only surviving substantially complete EPB 1s are Cliff Brown’s glider and another held by the RAAF Association at Bull Creek in Western Australia. Unfortunately, no trace exists of the Flying Plank built by Glidair Sailplanes in Sydney and test flown by Fred Hoinville at Moorabbin in 1957. In addition, a larger two seat derivative (known as the Twin Plank) designed and built by Glidair Sailplanes (completed 1958) is held at the Power House Museum, Castlehill, in Sydney.

Inscriptions & Markings

None

Glider – Sailplane – Bolkow Phoebus C - Bolkow Phoebus C – registration VH-GSW

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The Museum’s Phoebus is a modern looking single seat glass fibre sailplane with a ‘T’ tailplane. It is finished in white with light red detailing including thin red stripe on wings and some red striping on fuselage sides from nose to underneath wings.

Historical information

The Phoebus is a fibreglass composite sailplane that was designed by H. Nagele, R. Linder and R. Eppler in the early 1960s for competition flying. It is a derivative from the Akaflieg Stuttart Phonix which was the first sailplane to be built of fibreglass. The first Phoebus, a Standard Class design with a 15 metre wingspan, flew in 1964. The Phoebus C is the open class version of the type that was introduced in 1967. It has a 17 metre wing span, retractable wheel and tail brake parachute. Several hundred Phoebus sailplanes (all versions) were made by the manufacturer Bolkow at Ottobrun in Germany before production ended in 1970. The Museum’s Phoebus C, serial number 866, was built in 1969. It was donated to the Museum by Ian Cohn in 2008.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Serial number 866 on plate affixed inside cockpit – registration VH-GSW which has been painted on the sides of the fuselage rear of the wings. A Freistaat Bayern crest has been applied to each side of the vertical stabilizer.

Glider – Sailplane – Auto tow launching cable laying and retrieval winch - Winch

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Single drum and motorized drive mechanism mounted on a mobile steel frame.

Historical information

The auto tow launching mechanism was designed by Ray Jamieson of Cobram in the north of Victoria. The prototype was built the for the Corowa Gliding Club where it was used for some years. After Ray’s brother, Bert Jamieson, had witnessed the machine in use at Corowa, at Bert’s request, Ray built second one (the Museum’s exhibit) for use at Bacchus Marsh airfield. Bert lived in Melbourne at the time and was a member of the Victorian Motorless Flight Group (VMFG) which used Bacchus Marsh airfield. This occurred in the 1970s. The method of operation was to have the auto tow mechanism mounted in the back of a utility motor vehicle. The launching cable was attached to the glider. With the Volkswagen engine of the mechanism running, the tow vehicle would then drive along the runway to commence the launch. The mechanism would automatically apply brake pressure to the cable drum as the vehicle proceeded freely letting out the cable and then smoothly towing the glider into the air. When the launching cable reached a certain angle, the pilot would release the cable from the glider at which point the winching mechanism would automatically retrieve the cable in preparation for the next launch. This allowed quicker restarts and the flexibility of easily changing runways to suit the wind conditions. It made gliding a simple and cost-effective operation. Ray Jamieson and his son often used the prototype which they named “George” at Corowa in this way. With the exception of several demonstration launches, the Museum’s example of this type of device was not used by the VMFG at Bacchus Marsh due to rulings by the Department of Civil Aviation encouraging the use of aero tow launching at their site.

Significance

As far as is known this is the only device of its type in the world and is indicative of the ingenuity found amongst the Australian gliding fraternity.

Glider – Sailplane - Auto-Tug Engine - Ford Essex 3.8 litre V6 engine

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Ford auto engine mounted on mobile stand

Historical information

The 1982 Ford V6 engine, built at the Ford Essex Engine Plant at Windsor in Ontario Canada, was released by Ford for installation in a number of car and light truck models manufactured in Canada, United States, Mexico and Venezula. Production probably exceeded 7 million items. The Australian Gliding Museum’s exhibit was an engine converted for aircraft use that was bought for the Gliding Federation of Australia “Auto-Tug” program from Javelin Aircraft Company in Wichita in USA. “Auto-Tug” was an experimental program sponsored by the Gliding Federation of Australia to equip a glider – sailplane Piper Pawnee PA-25-150 tug with a water-cooled engine to alleviate the costs of running and maintaining the Lycoming engines fitted to Pawnee tugs in Australia. The program began in 1988 and was aimed at obtaining limited certification for converting dedicated glider – sailplane tow planes. The engine equipped with modified intake manifolds produced 198 hp for flight with the same propeller RPM for take-off as the original Lycoming 0-540 engine. However, fuel consumption was halved as the water cooling of the Ford engine enabled quicker descents with throttle closed following the release of the sailplane. Based on the results of GFA’s program, CASA concluded that engine was quite suitable for an aircraft installation and rated it more reliable than the equivalent Lycoming and Continental aircraft engine. The use of the 1982 Ford V6 engine type for Pawnee tug conversions was discontinued when the General Motors LS1 5.7 litre V8 became available. It is understood that a small number of conversions have been done using the LS1 engine. This brief history is based on information obtained from Mike Burns and David Sharples who were involved in the Auto-Tug program from 1988 to 1992. Technical information relating to the 1982 Ford V6 automotive engine is contained in a paper by D.L. Armstrong and G.F. Stirrat of the Engine Engineering Office at Ford.

Significance

To be assessed

Glider – Sailplane – ES49b Kangaroo - ES49b - Kangaroo

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

This collection item consists of the airframe remnants of the second ES49b glider built by Edmund Schneider Pty Ltd. It was acquired new by the Toowoomba Gliding Club and later transferred to the Leichhardt Soaring Club (since disbanded) in Queensland circa 1953. It is understood that it was badly damaged in 1967. Remaining are parts of the fuselage, cockpit, canopy, control systems, wings, wing struts, tailplane, elevator and rudder, All of these parts have deteriorated greatly from ageing and weathering, even though they have been protected from direct exposure to the elements for much of the time. Nevertheless they show constructional detail and the colour scheme (predominantly white with dark green elements). The rudder, which is painted dark green and bears the name Leichhardt Soaring Club Mt Isa , helps identification and is witness to the glider’s past service in that area of central Queensland.

Historical information

The Kangaroo is a high wing metal strutted tandem two seater sailplane, constructed mainly from wood and covered in fabric. The design evolved out of the earlier ES49 Wallaby, but in fact was almost a new type. In appearance it was a more elegant type with better performance than its predecessor, the Wallaby. Edmund Schneider Pty Ltd built two ES 49b Kangaroo sailplanes and the Museum’s remains are of the second example. The first example no longer exists. The MUSEUM’S ES 49B , VH-GFL (its given registration), was sold new to the Toowoomba Gliding Club and after a number of years was sold to the newly established Leichhardt Soaring Club at Mount Isa. It was flown extensively from 1953 to 1967 at various Queensland locations until its ultimate demise at Longreach in Queensland. The wreckage was stored from 1967 to 1997 in a shed at Longreach until it was moved to Emerald in Queensland. In the year 2000 Australian Gliding Museum member Ron Geake travelled to Emerald and recovered the wreck to his property at Gympie in Queensland, and subsequently stored the airframe on behalf of the Museum until November 2011, when another Museum member Geoff Hearn travelled to Gympie and relocated the wreckage to the Bruce Brockhoff Annexe at Bacchus Marsh.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Serial serial number 4 by Edmund Schneider Pty Ltd. Formerly registered as VH-GFL

variometer

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Rate of climb indictor with red and green tubes

Historical information

The instrument was used in the Slingsby T31b glider during 1950s . It was a basic instrument to indicate rate of climb /descent of the glider during flight during 1940s and 1950s.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Cosim Variometer.rt/341 Cobb Slater. Made in England.

Glider – Sailplane – Pelican 2 - Pelican 2 – Registration VH-GFY. Originally named Kite III

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Wooden 2 seat glider sailplane with fabric covering. Distinctive features include the pod and boom fuselage with side by side seating for pilot and a second person. The canopy of perspex supported by aluminum framing opens with port and starboard segments separately folding upwards and forward. The instrument panel includes altimeter, airspeed indicator, slip indicator and variometers. In addition to the usual controls, there is a trim operated by a small wheel mounted centrally, at head height, on the bulkhead at the rear of the cockpit. Incorporated in the skid under the fuselage pod are two wheels (one approximately midships and the other at the rear end). It has a three piece cantilever wing of approximately nearly 17 metres. The ailerons run almost full length of the outer wing segments. A Gottingen 426 section has been used changing to M6 at the tips. Outer wing segments are joined to the centre section to give about 300 mm of dihedral at the tips. The glider is equipped with airbrakes. The colour scheme consists of orange fuselage with black nose and skid. The tailplane / elevator and rudder are painted white. The wing is predominantly white with an orange leading edge.

Historical information

This unique aircraft was conceived in 1943 as a two seat trainer. A very large part of the design work can be attributed to Jock Barratt and Harold Bradley. The general layout adopted is similar to the Kite I and Kite II single seat sailplanes of Martin Warner and Allan Campbell. Having regard to this heritage, the glider was originally named Kite III but renamed Pelican 2, perhaps because it was the second two seat training glider built by the Waikerie Gliding Club – the first being the Pelican, a reconfigured Pratt Utility glider. Pelican 2 was first flown in 1952 and regularly since then, at least until about 1992. The Pelican 2’s performance was found to be very good for sailplanes of its era and was often used for more advanced flying in addition to training new pilots. Very few changes have been made to the Pelican 2 over the years. The undercarriage was modified after its initial testing to improve the placement of the wheels. The trailing edge of the rudder (originally straight) was rounded adding to the surface area. The twin shoulder tow line bridles were replaced with a belly hook when aviation design rules declared shoulder bridles dangerous and a nose hook has since been added to allow for aero-towing. When the Pelican 2 was originally finished, it had an orange and silver colour scheme. The silver elements of the colour scheme were subsequently repainted white when silver dope became unavailable.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Registration VH-GFY On each side of rudder – “Pelican II” in black lettering on a rectangle of silver On each side of fuselage pod the letters ‘FY’ On each side of the fuselage, below the edge of the cockpit opening – “WAIKERIE” in black paint.

Glider – Sailplane – Schneider Grunau Baby 3A - Grunau Baby Mark 3A – registration VH-GHV and originally referred to as the “Red Grunau”

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Glider of wood and fabric construction, with steel wing struts. Currently painted crème with yellow details. Underside of fuselage is painted orange.

Historical information

This aircraft, the first glider built by Schneiders after they immigrated to Australia, was test flown on 3 January 1953 by Dave Darbyshire and Owen Lewis. It is the only machine of its type. It is essentially a Grunau Baby 2B with a Perspex enclosed cockpit, wing airbrakes and a landing wheel. However, the wing design came from an existing Grunau 3 type that was being built in Germany. The glider has given extensive service for a number of owners – including the Gliding Club of Victoria, Sunraysia Gliding Club, Millicent Gliding Club, Max Bugler of Morwell and Garth Hudson of Brighton in Victoria. Prior to being donated to the Australian Gliding Museum in January 2001 the glider had logged over 2200 hours flying time from over 9000 flights.

Significance

The glider is an improved Grunau Baby design that Edmund Schneider built after coming to Australia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Registered as VH-GHV

Glider –Sailplane – FS-24 Phonix - Phonix

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Glassfibre single seat sailplane, finished white with blue stripes on fin and rudder.

Historical information

The FS-24 Phonix is the first sailplane design to be built using a moulded fiberglass sandwich technique. It was designed by Hermann Nagele and Richard Eppler leading a group setup for the purpose at Stuttgart Technical University in the early 1950s. Initial construction was undertaken at workshops of Wolf Hirth and the first prototype was completed at the Bolkow Aircraft Company where Nagele and another member of the group, Rudi Lindner, had gained employment. It flew on 27 November 1957. Two further prototypes were built incorporating a T-tail and other refinements. Eight in all were built before production was stopped in 1961. A number of gliding records were broken in Phonix sailplanes in Germany in 1962-1963. It was found to have a best glide ratio of 40:1. The Museum’s example, No. 403 is a prototype that was built on 25 May 1960 [Registration D-8354]. It was converted at Bolkow to a Phonix T in 1963 and sold to a private owner in Switzerland [Registration HB-746] and later then to gliding club Segelfluggruppe Solothurn in 1965. The glider returned to Germany in 1971 (Meersburg) and re-registered as D-0738. It moved to a new owner in Allershausen in 1976, and again to Lindhoft in 1982. In 1983 the glider was sold to owners at Hasselt, Belgium and given registration OO-ZQD. In 1989 a further change of ownership occurred and the glider went to Leusden in the Netherlands where it was registered as PH-949. In 2006 the Phonix No.403 was imported into Australia by John Ashford of the Geelong Gliding Club. On 30 January 2007, it was registered as VH-GRP. However, as at January 2016 it has not been flown in Australia. In the course of its flying history the glider was damaged several times and repaired. At one stage a larger rudder was fitted and later on this modification was reversed. With the original conversion to a Phonix T and subsequent repairs and changes to equipment the weight of the airframe increased from 182 kg to approximately 220 kg. Nevertheless, the wing loading is a modest 20kg/square metre. As at January 2016, minor repairs and airworthiness certification are required to return the glider to flying condition.

Significance

This exhibit is highly significant as it is one of only eight of this pioneering sailplane design. It is the only one in Australia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Australian registration GRP on rudder; Serial Number 403 and Vintage glider club of Netherlands plaque in cockpit

Glider – Sailplane – Alexander Schleicher K4 - AS-K4 Rhonlerche II

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Tandem two seat high wing strutted glider consisting of wood with plywood and fabric wings, tailplane / elevators, fin / rudder, and tubular steel framed, fabric covered fuselage. The glider is finished in a white, green and yellow paint scheme.

Historical information

The Alexander Schleicher K4 was designed in the mid 1950s by Rudolf Kaiser as a club training glider and several hundred were built. The Australian Gliding Museum’s K4, VH-IKK, serial number 55, was built in 1957 and purchased by the RAF Air Training Corp. U.K. After some years it was sold to a New Zealand Gliding Club and in 1990 with over 4800 hours, number of launches unknown, it was purchased by the Brisbane Valley Soaring Club and in 1994 was transferred to the Far North Queensland Soaring Centre who operated it from the Mareeba airfield. On 9 January 2000 it was donated to Vintage Gliders Australia by Kevin Sedgman at a presentation ceremony with Alan Patching receiving the glider during the Rally at Lake Keepit. It has been flown regularly at vintage glider rallies and now is one of the flyable exhibits held by the Museum. VH-IKK is one of two K4s in Australia, the other being VH-XJP which is believed to be in storage in Queensland in a damaged condition.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

“Vintage Gliders Australia” name in white lettering on fuselage sides and registration VH-IKK in black lettering on rudder

Glider – Sailplane – ES59 Arrow - ES 59 Arrow – registered as VH-GNH

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

This aircraft is a single seat wooden sailplane with one piece wing. The instruments are not present except for altimeter. Fin and rudder are of swept back design. Colour scheme is creamy off white combined with merging yellow, orange and red elements (similar to Northern Territory logo colours) – a ‘sunset’ theme. The underside of the fuselage has the sunset colouring as does the wing tips and rudder. The aircraft came to the museum on an open trailer that had been designed to carry the one piece wing.

Historical information

This aircraft is one of 9 single seat ES 59 advanced club sailplanes manufactured by Edmund Schneider Pty Ltd in the 1960s. It was first flown in August 1963 and delivered to the Darling Downs Soaring Club at Toowoomba Queensland. At that Club it had 2603 flights and recorded a total airtime of 1475 hours. In addition to many local circuits and soaring and cross country flying, it was used at gliding competitions, including Nationals at Benalla in December 1964, State Championships at Oakey in April 1965, at Warwick in April 1966, and at (Inverell?) in March 1967. On at least 15 occasions flight times in excess of 5 hours duration were achieved. Piloting the glider on some of these long flights were E Maiden, D McCaffrey, and L Richards. On 5 October 1970, the glider had a new life when it was transferred to D. B. Clark of Mangerton New South Wales and subsequently to the Wollongong Gliding Club in New South Wales. It recorded 1927 flights with a total airtime of 1179 hours at the club between October 1970 and June 1988. Competition appearances included the State Championships held at Forbes in January 1972. Places away from Wollongong where the glider was launched include Cootamundra, Wagga, Temora, Marulon, Narromine, Leeton, Nowra, Goulburn, Horsham, Greenthorpe. Notable long flights in this glider while it was with Wollongong Gliding Club includes; 5 hours 41 minutes by D. Illyes on 10 December 1972, Silver C flight of 5 hours 50 minutes by D. Chessor on 29 December 1972, Silver C flight of 5 hours 21 minutes by R. Roots on 28 December 1973, a 226 km flight of 6 hours 57 minutes by P. Riley on 5 January 1975, Silver C flight of 5 hours 16 minutes by R. Lewis on 7 January 1976, a 6 hour 20 minute 300 km triangle flight attempt by D. Illyes on 10 January 1976, a 6 hour 55 minute 300 km triangle attempt by P Rigby on 30 January 1977. In addition P Riley achieved a Gold C height on 2 January 1975 and two other 5 hour flights by unnamed pilots were made in this glider on 5 and 6 January 1977. On 15 June 1988 it was transferred to Ron Geake who transported it to Warrego in Northern Territory (flown once at Alice Springs), and then to Gympie in Queensland where it was flown about 20 times by the end of 1995. It was also flown on a small number of occasions at Forbes in New South Wales in 1996 and 1997. During 1998 and 1999 the glider was sparsely used (9 flights) at locations that have not been recorded. From May 1999 until transfer to the Australian Gliding Museum in May 2011 it apparently was not flown. Aggregate airtime hours for the glider stand at 2702 hours 53 minutes. It has been launched 4569 times. In addition to the numerous minor repairs, the glider has undergone some significant overhauls. In 1964 and 1968 it was damaged in heavy landings. On the latter occasion the fuselage was partially rebuilt with a number of new bulkheads supplied by Edmund Schneider Pty Ltd. In 1971, the major overhaul included the stripping and replacement of the fabric and a complete repainting. It had 20 and 30 year inspections in November 1982 and March 1994 respectively. On each occasion it was noted that the aircraft has not had any major accidents. After the 30 year inspection it was re-covered with “Stits” fabric and again repainted. An ES59 Arrow (not the Australian Gliding Museum’s example) was the first Australian designed sailplane to fly at a gliding world championship. It was flown by Jack Iggulden at Argentina in 1963.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Registered as VH-GHN Plate in cockpit with details of manufacturer states; manufactured by E. Schneider Ltd, Adelaide SA; Type ES 59; Serial Number 62; Date August 1963. Letters ‘NH’ in red on fuselage sides rear of wing, and on underside of port wing. Stickers of Northern Territory logo (silhouetted bird in flight on sunset) are located on each side of fin.

Painting - Landscape - The First Aerotow – Gawler – 5 March 1950

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Oil and Ink Painting - Framed

Historical information

Shows a DH Tiger Moth aeroplane towing an orange glider at take off. Glider appears to be a Grunau Baby II. The scene commemorates the first aero tow of a glider at a former RAAF airfield at Gawler, South Australia which was used by the Gliding and Soaring Club of South Australia in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Inscriptions & Markings

On painting – Signature of Artist On back of painting – “The First Aero Tow – Gawler – 5 March 1950” On back of painting – Small certificate signed by Barmera Show convenor, J. Agg – indicating that the painting won a prize at 1984 show

Glider – Rhon Ranger Primary - “Rhon Ranger”

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The glider consists of a simple open wooden frame fuselage (painted red) with pink doped fabric covered section at rear, fabric covered wooden framed wing of constant cord (pink doped), fabric covered wooden framed tailplane, elevators and rudder (pink doped); plywood covered wooden framed floats (painted white) mounted on metal struts (painted white). Airframe, when assembled, is braced with tubular metal struts (painted white). In addition the wing root joint between the wings is covered by plywood panel fairings. The pilots seat and back rest cushion are covered with black vinyl upholstery.

Historical information

This “Rhon Ranger” glider was built by Hain (Jack) Friswell in 1948. The “Rhon Ranger” is a type of primary glider (or Zogling variant), designed in Europe, for which plans were published in America in the 1930s. It is understood that in America it is also called the “Mead” primary glider after the Chicago firm that marketed Rhon Ranger kits and plans there – for example see advertisement Popular Science July 1931 page 124. A “Mead Rhone Ranger” replica is held by the New England Air Museum, USA; see photograph at www.neam.org. A short video may also be viewed of another example under construction at the Owls Head Transportation Museum near Rockland, Maine, USA on www.youtube.com/1930 mead primary glider restoration. The history of the Australian Gliding Museum’s Friswell Rhon Ranger prior to 1970 is scant. It is understood that it was flown at Melbourne in the 1950s and probably not since then until the 1970s. The excellent structural condition of the glider suggests that it has had very little use. In 1970, or thereabouts, the glider was purchased by the Hearn family from Melbourne who equipped it with floats so that it could be launched by power boat tow at Lake Eildon in central Victoria. In March 2001 the glider was donated by Bruce Hearn to the Australian Gliding Museum.

Significance

To be assessed

Glider – Sailplane: Kaiser Ka 2B - Kaiser Ka 2B Rhonschwalbe

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Tandem two seat training glider / sailplane of wood and fabric construction

Historical information

The Ka 2, a tandem two seat training sailplane of 15 metre wing span, was designed by Rudolf Kaiser for Schleicher in 1953. It was a versatile craft due to its good cross country soaring capability. With the Ka 2B the design was improved in 1955 by lengthening the wing span to 16 metres and increasing the dihedral and tip washout. The fuselage was lengthened slightly as well. Schleicher built 42 Ka2s from 1953 to 1955 and 75 Ka 2Bs from 1955 to 1957. In addition Schleicher supplied kits for construction of the sailplane by independent builders. The Australian Gliding Museum’s example is the single Ka 2b built in Australia from plans and is designated as GFA-HB-47. The club concerned was the Illawarra Soaring Club of Sydney. The glider registered as VH-GHO and first flew in October 1960. However, within a short time it was badly damaged and needed major repairs which took over a year to complete. After lengthy service at Illawarra Soaring Club it was transferred to the Stirling Gliding Club in Western Australia in August 1976. Again it suffered damage in a landing accident in 1978. The damaged glider was put into storage at Northam where it remained for approximately 11 years. It was acquired by Mike Valentine in 1989 and brought back to flying condition at Bacchus Marsh, Victoria. The last entry in the log book is dated January 1997 at which time it had accumulated 1170 hours from 2446 flights. The last owner prior to transfer to the Australian Gliding Museum was John Ashford of the Geelong Gliding Club.

Significance

The aircraft is the only Ka 2b built in Australia by an amateur group from plans

Inscriptions & Markings

Registration VH-GHO Serial number - GFA HB 47

Glider – Sailplane – Slingsby Skylark 4 - Skylark 4

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

The Skylark 4 is high wing single seat sailplane of mainly wooden construction with plywood and fabric covering. However, the cockpit and forward part of the fuselage consists of glass reinforced plastic which was innovative at the time that the type was designed. The cockpit provides for a semi reclining position for the pilot protected with a full Perspex canopy. The wings are made up of a centre section with constant chord and tapered wing tips. The aircraft has a conventional arrangement for the tail stabiliser / control surfaces.

Historical information

The Skylark 4, the final in the Slingsby Skylark series, dates from 1961. The design heralded a trend towards the use of plastics in the construction of gliders. Slingsby incorporated GRP (glass reinforced plastic) panels to achieve a streamlined fuselage nose and cockpit area while retaining the more traditional wood techniques for the rest of the aircraft. Another notable feature was the smooth wing surface that was obtained using a Gaboon ply skin across the ribs. Best glide performance of 1:33 was found to be comparable with the early full GRP glider designs. The Museum’s example (VH-GTB – C/N 1382) was built in 1963 and originally owned by Chuck Bentson of the UK. It was brought to Australia in 1967 by Jeremy Picket-Heaps and flown at various places including Benalla, Cooma and Gundaroo. In 1970 the glider was transferred to the New England Soaring Club. Many flights were made from Armidale and Bellata in Northern New South Wales. On one occasion, the glider was kept aloft for 8 hours 45 minutes and on another the pilot took it around a 500 kilometre triangle in nearly 8 hours. In 1980 it was sold to Ralph (“Feathers”) Crompton and was flown extensively in South Australia until 1988. The final owner before the glider was given to the Museum in 2004 was Ross Dutton of Melbourne. The last recorded flight occurred in 1992. The glider at that point had logged over 2000 hours flying time from about 2000 launches. The airframe is currently being restored to flying condition under the expert supervision of Museum volunteer Bob Wyatt.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

The sailplane bears construction number 1382 and is registered in Australia as VH-GTB

Glider – Sailplane – Grunau Baby 2 - Silver - Grunau Baby 2B- formerly registered VH-GLW

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Wooden – fabric covered glider – missing canopy Perspex, Instrument panel has turn and bank only. Currently the glider features a predominately silver grey colour scheme.

Historical information

This exhibit is a home built glider of a Grunau Baby 2 design modified by the addition of a fully enclosing Perspex canopy, spoilers, and a landing wheel. It was built by Alex Mackie and was originally owned by the Southern Cross Gliding Club at Camden, New South Wales. The first flight was on 19 May 1956. After about 10 years service with that club it passed through a series of owners, including the Forbes Soaring Club, Beaudesert Gliding Club and private operators. The last major inspection and overhaul of the glider was April 1972. It passed a further airworthy inspection in April 1975. At that time, questions were raised about the weight of the glider (found to be 400 lbs empty). In 1976 it had fallen into a non-airworthy condition and has not flown since. By that time the glider had flown 1161 hrs 11 minutes from 5228 launches.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

Formerly registered VH-GLW

Painting - Framed - Restless for Flight

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Oil and ink painting – framed – that shows a glider wing hovering above ground in a lane in front of the open doorway of (presumably) a workshop.

Historical information

Possibly this painting is an artistic reference to the Grunau Baby glider constructed by Gliding and Soaring Club of South Australia members in 1947.

Inscriptions & Markings

Signed by artist On rear – ‘“Restless for Flight” Alan J Delaine August 1986’

Glider – Sailplane – Schweizer TG-3A - Schweizer TG-3A – Registration Number VH-GDI – called “Explorer”

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Tubular metal framed fuselage (without covering and fittings), wooden rudder (no covering) and in damaged condition, wooden fuselage component (formers for fuselage top), Parts of control mechanism, Wooden stringers, Wooden wings without fabric covering and in damaged condition, Ailerons, Tailplane /Elevator without fabric covering, Perspex bubble canopies.

Historical information

The Schweizer SGS 2-12 or TG-3A as officially certificated is a glider that was designed in 1941-1942 and produced in United States of America from 1942 for training of military glider pilots. The design was based on an earlier Schweizer two-seat training glider, the Schweizer SGS 2-8, which had a fabric covered steel framed fuselage and aluminum wings. The TG-3A was designed avoiding the use of aluminum which was a strategic material reserved for combat aircraft production. Consequently the wings of the TG-3A were constructed from wood covered with plywood and aircraft fabric (in the traditional manner) and, with other design changes to simplify production, the glider ended up bigger and heavier than the SGS 2-8. Performance did not suffer. In fact, the TG-3A may have had a slightly better glide ratio compared with the SGS 2-8. It is understood that over 100 TG-As were supplied to the USA military and at the end of the war many were sold off as surplus. Fred Hoinville imported the Museum’s TG-3A into Australia in August 1950 after negotiating the difficulties posed by currency restrictions. It is understood that it had been built in 1948 and given construction number G15. On arrival in Australia it was assembled at Bankstown aerodrome and delivered by aero-tow behind a DH Tiger Moth to Camden where Hoinville’s club, the Hinkler Soaring Club, was based. It was found from experimentation that it was preferable for the TG-3A to adopt a low-tow position behind the tug aircraft in stead of the usual high-tow position. This enabled the tug to hold a better attitude for climbing and an acceptable rate of climb. Hoinville’s TG-3A performed well at the Hinkler club in 1950-1951. Several altitude records (including a solo flight to 8000 feet by Grace Roberts – a national women’s record) were set and many soaring flight made over Camden. However, it was badly damaged in a crash landing on 15 April 1951. (See A. Ash, Gliding in Australia, pp 132-133) The glider was repaired after the crash at Camden. It is likely that modifications were made to the cockpit canopy at this time. There were three configuration tried at various times: the original dual cockpit canopy as was standard for TG3As; an unusual dual bubble canopy set up; and a single canopy over the forward seating position (in effect converting the glider to a single seat). When the glider was flown by Hoinville at the 1958 Australian Gliding Championships at Benalla, Victoria in January 1959 (refer The Age Newspaper, January 10, 1959 p.21) it had a single canopy so that it could be used in solo competition. No logbook record has been found by the Australian Gliding Museum for the glider while it was owned by Fred Hoinville and flown at the Hinkler Soaring Club. However, records show that the glider was entered on the Australian register as VH-GDI on 6 May 1957. And the Logbook commencing in 1959 shows that ownership passed to the Port Augusta Gliding Club in South Australia on 16 August 1959. Inspections were carried out at that club and airworthiness certificates renewed in 1965. The logbook record indicates that VH-GDI had 1191 flights with an aggregate time in the air of 197 hours at the Wilmington Road Airstrip used by the Port Augusta Club. The issue of this airworthiness certificate appears to have occurred at the time that glider was transferred to the Cooma Gliding Club, New South Wales. Flying at Cooma began in November 1966 and continued until August 1969: the glider was in the air a further 108 hours from 1067 flights. The last recorded technical inspection of the glider was conducted by Reg Pollard on 28 September 1968. The glider then passed on to Bill Riley. The certificate of registration for VH-GDI was reissued in the name of Riley Aeronautics Pty Ltd of Tocumwal, New South Wales, on 20 March 1980. Bill Riley stored the glider until March 2004 when it was collected by the Australian Gliding Museum. It is not clear whether the current poor state of the glider airframe is due to an accident when last flown in 1969 or the conditions under which it has been stored over many years or a combination of factors. The glider featured in Fred Hoinville’s book “Halfway to Heaven”.

Significance

To be assessed

Glider - Sailplane - LK10A - Laister-Kauffman 10A two seat sailplane

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Modified LK10A glider consisting of tubular steel fuselage with a combination of fabric and metal covering, fabric covered wooden wings and other flying surfaces.

Historical information

The Laister-Kauffman 10A (LK10A) is a 2 seat a military training glider developed from a successful Jack Laister single seat glider called Yankee Doodle that first flew in 1938 and was exhibited at the Paris Air Show of 1939. The two seater variation was ordered in 1941 by the US Army for training glider pilots of troop carrying gliders. The military designation was XTG-4. The LK 10A glider was a simpler, more robust design than Yankee Doodle. A longer canopy enclosed both seating positions. The top of the fuselage formed a straight ridge from the top of the canopy to the point where the fin – rudder connected. Also, the design was simplified by adopting straight spar wings of 15.2 metres in place of gull wings of 14.170 metres. During the war years 156 LK10As were produced before the contracts to supply the US Army were terminated. Many of these were later sold as surplus. The Museum’s exhibit (serial number 122) was built in 1943. It was imported into Australia in the 1950s by Ric New, a member of the Gliding Club of Western Australia. Ric New modified the glider by “flat topping” the fuselage and making other aerodynamic changes. This kind of modification of the LK10A was a well tried strategy in United States for extracting better performance from the glider. It is understood that the reduction in weight and cleaner aerodynamics from the changes could increase the glide ratio from 1:24 to something like 1:30. The LK10A was located at the Gliding Club of Western Australia for many years. Records reveal that it was kept airworthy until about 1975.

Significance

The LK10A is an important acquisition in that it allows one to compare the state of two seat glider design in United States and the United Kingdom in the immediate post war period. It is interesting to note that at that time a number of clubs in Australia who acquired a two seat glider for training chose the United Kingdom open cockpit high strutted wing offerings from Slingsby (e.g. T31) instead of more innovative military surplus gliders from America. In the immediate post war period difficulties in obtaining import licences for items priced in US dollars may have been a factor.

Inscriptions & Markings

None

Glider / Sailplane – Grunau Baby 2B - Grunau Baby 2B - “Blue Grunau” – formerly registered as VH-GLC

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Single seat glider /sailplane of wood and fabric construction in the course of restoration as a non flying exhibit.

Historical information

This Grunau Baby 2B glider, often referred to by those who are familiar with it, as the “Blue Grunau”, was built by Australian Sailplanes in 1946 and acquired by a syndicate consisting of Norm Hyde, Rob Dowling, Leo Dowling, Dick Duckworth and Ted Desmond of the Gliding Club of Victoria. Piloted by syndicate members and other GCV members the glider performed well in soaring and cross country flights at the various sites used by the GCV in 1947, 1948 and 1949. The glider went to Sydney for a while and then returned to be operated by another syndicate at the GCV. Pat Burke and Bob McAliece bought the glider in the 1950s and then sold it to Keith, Jack and Bruce Hearn of Melbourne. In 1957 the Blue Grunau moved to Western Australia and was added to the Glider Register as VH-GLC. There were a series of owners, as follows: 12 December 1957: G.R Higginson of Bedford Park, W.A. 10 January 1958: C. Ludeman of Beechboro, W.A. and G. Brown of Belmont, W.A. 3 November 1959: G.H. Brown of Carlisle, W.A. 24 July 1961: D. Woodward of Karalee, W.A. 20 November 1963: G.H. Brown of Carlisle, W.A. 4 February 1964: Gliding Club of W.A. 30 November 1965: Narrogin Gliding Club, W.A. 1 June 1968: R.T. Brough and J.W. Dewhurst of Rossmoyne, W.A. 15 October 1972: V.G. Kolsky and partners of Medina, W.A. As at the 16 June 1985 the owners were J. Welsh of Huntingdale, and W.A. and A.H. Smith of Gosnells, W.A. The glider has come to the Australian Gliding Museum via the RAAFA (WA) Division. The flying record of the Blue Grunau has been logged for the period of 28 December 1957 to 17 September 1975: Time in air – 559 hours 37 minutes from 1513 flights. The glider suffered damage in a number of flying accidents: in particular from accidents on 4 November 1967 and 17 September 1975. It appears that, in the course of the major repairs that occurred, modifications were made to the airframe including fitting of spoilers to the wings and changing the profile of the fuselage nose. Also, at some stage, the cockpit was enclosed with a Schneider Kingfisher type Perspex canopy. The Australian Gliding Museum has repaired the airframe restoring the fuselage to its original shape.

Significance

To be assessed

Photograph – Gliding Club of Victoria primary glider - Fletcher Smith

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

Photographic print -framed

Historical information

Fletcher Smith was a member of the Geelong Gliding Club. He is shown sitting on the Gliding Club of Victoria primary glider at Mordialloc, which was one of the places where that club flew in the 1940s.

Inscriptions & Markings

On rear – Born 17 January 1925 – Fletcher Smith in Gliding Club of Victoria Primary glider, Australia Day 1943 at Mordialloc Victoria – (Signed) F.D. Smith

Glider – Sailplane – Slingsby T53B - Slingsby T53B – registration VH-GUB

Australian Gliding Museum, Parwan

All metal twin seat glider / sailplane, painted white with red tips and markings.

Historical information

The Slingsby T53 glider was designed by J. Sellars in the 1960s as an easily maintained two seat trainer suitable for RAF Air Training Corp use and for sale in the USA and Australian markets where wooden gliders were becoming less popular. The Slingsby T53 prototype first flew in 1967. The T53B version has a conventional fixed tailplane with elevator instead of the all-moving tailplane of the original type. The “B” version also has ailerons of narrower chord and lacks wing flaps. Further changes were made to the fin (extended above the tailplane) for the final “C” version. Production of the T53 at Slingsby was disrupted by a fire at the factory in 1968. As a consequence the contract to supply 40 of the type to the RAF was cancelled and only a relatively small number (possibly 27) were made by Slingsby before the project was discontinued. The rights were later sold to Yorkshire Sailplanes. It designated the glider as the YS53 Sovereign – only a few were produced (possibly 3). The Australian Gliding Museum’s example is a type “B” model. It bears serial number 1686 and was manufactured in 1967. It was registered in Australia as VH-GUB in name of Boonah Gliding Club, Boonah, which is about 90 kilometres south west of Brisbane in Queensland. Locally it was called “the Bomber”! It is believed that it is the only one of its type to come to Australia.

Significance

To be assessed

Inscriptions & Markings

“Slingsby T53B” on each side of fuselage below cockpit opening; Registration VH-GUB on each side of fuselage at rear.