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Glider - Sailplane

From the Collection of Australian Gliding Museum 20 Jensz Road Parwan Victoria

Description
Tandem two seat sailplane of a wood and tubular steel construction covered with plywood and fabric. It has a fully enclosed cockpit under perspex (which is missing from this airframe). The wings which join the fuselage at shoulder height are swept forward such that the aircraft can be flown solo from the front seat and be properly balanced. The aircraft is in a damaged condition.
Links
Object Registration
0208
Keywords
glider, sailplane, australian gliding, scheibe, bergfalke, byron soaring centre, mangalore gliding club, dattler, southern riverina gliding club, tocumwal
Historical information
The Scheibe Bergfalke II is a high performance (for its day) and relatively inexpensive two seat sailplane designed by Egon Scheibe. It appeared in 1953 as a derivative of the Scheibe Mu13 Bergfalke and incorporated design changes to resolve and simplify structural issues that affected the Mu13. The Bergfalke II-55 followed in 1955. About 300 of the Bergfalke II and II-55 types were built in Germany and Sweden.

This aircraft of the Bergfalke II-55 type was built by Scheibe in 1961 (work number 339). After a long life at Fliegergruppe Leimen e.V. logging 6754 flights and 1588 hours in the air, the glider was imported into Australia from Germany in June 2004.

The glider was registered as VH-GKZ in January 2005 by Thomas Dattler of Millumbindy and flown only a small number of occasions (probably at Byron Soaring Centre). The Mangalore Gliding Club appears to have taken an interest in the glider in 2006 and completed routine Form 2 inspections in 2006 and 2009. The amount of usage during this period is unclear as the logbook records held are incomplete. In January 2012 the glider was purchased by the Southern Riverina Gliding Club and flown at Tocumwal until it was damaged in 2013 due to being blown over while at rest on the airfield. The 10 year survey was due in March 2013 and a decision was made by the club to donate the glider to the Australian Gliding Museum instead of completing the necessary repairs for returning it to an airworthy condition.

It is estimated that the glider was flown about 300 times and perhaps logged about 140 hours in the air in Australia.
When Made
1961
Made By
Scheibe FLGZ-Bau (Maker)
Significance
If restored this exhibit will be representative of the Scheibe Bergfalke II-55 sailplane type (a rarity in Australia).
Inscriptions & Markings
Registration "GKZ" on sides of fuselage
Last updated
17 Aug 2020 at 12:27PM