Stories Organisations Projects About Login

Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven VIC 3925 (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214; 03 5951 2800

Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

There are no comments yet.

Leave a comment

330 items with images

330 items with images

lace piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Chaff cutter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand operated chaff cutter, painted green with white scrolling; red cogs

Neck piece with front ruffle attached

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Seal fur muff

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

tennon saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cast steel blade and walnut handle. Surface rust and some paint spots on blade. "Nonpariel" brand. Elephant trade mark on handle and blade.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Nonpariel" brand. Elephant trade mark on handle and blade. W T Jackson Sheffield.

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Handwritten notesin pencil on paper, regarding fertilizing farm. Assumed to be written by Harry Jenkins

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and commitment to farming at Churchill Island and provides information on farming of the era.

Lace Piece trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Auger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

8 twists in the steel auger with cast iron chuck fused.

Inscriptions & Markings

Chuck: "2" Auger "16" "IRWIN MADE IN USA"

Hand Auger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Auger for working wood

Historical information

Alexander Mathieson & Sons Ltd ('& Sons', after c. 1890), of the Saracen Tool Works, Glasgow, advertised as 'manufacturers of planes, mechanical, engineering and edge-tools'. They received 'prize medals' at the London, Melbourne and Edinburgh International Exhibitions of 1851, 1862, 1880 and 1886, in their 'quest for perfection in tools'. Mathieson's vast output included specialised craft implements for coopers, ship's carpenters, tinsmiths and wheelwrights. The firm originated when master plane-maker John Manners opened premises in Saracen Lane, Glasgow, in 1792. 4 Alexander Mathieson (c. 1797–1852) took over his business in 1821, which he gave as the foundation date of his firm. He was later succeeded by his son, Thomas A. Mathieson (1822–1899), a prominent Glasgow magistrate and preceptor of Hutcheson's Hospital charitable institution. In 1854, Mathiesons moved to East Campbell Street, and had opened branches in Edinburgh, Dundee and Liverpool by 1876. The third generation comprised Thomas O. and James H. Mathieson (born 1867), the latter being a Glasgow bailie (councillor), whose estate totalled an enormous £150,939 in 1926. Mathieson's hand- and small machine-tools (e.g. bandsaws and beading machines) were exported worldwide, especially their 'heavy duty auger bits used... for boring railway sleepers'.

Inscriptions & Markings

Mathieson Glasgow (crescent moon trade mark) 2 1/4 " bore

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

blacksmith made steel wedge with irregular relief groove; surface rust

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

Grindstone

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Grindstone pedal operated with timber stand

Historical information

Unit was in poor condition when VCT purchased Churchill Island. Was rebuilt by John McFee

Significance

Typical of unints used on local farms

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

hand-made open ended spanner; rusty

Level

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Paint spots and wear at grooves. Wood, glass bubbles, brass cover over bubble. Round maker's seal missing.

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Notes handwritten in pencil on paper regarding fertilizer amounts in 100 weight bags per paddock, 11 paddocks. Dated 1959. Assumed to be written by Harry Jenkins

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming on Churchill Island and provides information on farming of the era.

Cigar holder

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Silver holder for 4 cigars awarded to Dr Harry Jenkins, owner of Churchill Island 1936-63.

Historical information

The item was awarded to Dr Harry Jenkins for a motorcycle race. Jenkins was a Great War air ace and racing driver and had a dental practice in Collins Street Melbourne. He owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This trophy demonstrates Harry Jenkins's reputed love of motor sport, speed and competition.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on centre 2 sections: MOTOR CYCLE CLUB OF NSW SCRATCH RACE 4 HP AND OVER H JENKINS 16-2-10 Also Hallmarks SYDENHAM PATENT 2272 A S

fishing reel handle

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

brass handle with turned wooden handles either end, brass flat and slightly tapered each end, hole in centre for attaching to reel.

Historical information

E H "Ted" Jenkins was the paraplegic son of Harry Jenkins who bought Churchill Island in 1936 as an interest for Ted. Ted lived on Churchill Island at various times with his nurse Sr Margaret "Jimmy" Campbell, e.g. second world war when they ran a shorthorn dairy farm, and at other times lived in their home in Melbourne. Ted was keen on 'ham' radio, and had many friends from his school who became life-long friends and frequent visitors to him on Churchill Island.

Significance

E H "Ted" Jenkins was the paraplegic son of Harry Jenkins who bought Churchill Island in 1936 as an interest for Ted. Ted lived on Churchill Island at various times with his nurse Sr Margaret "Jimmy" Campbell, e.g. second world war when they ran a shorthorn dairy farm, and at other times lived in their home in Melbourne. Ted was keen on 'ham' radio, and had many friends from his school who became life-long friends and frequent visitors to him on Churchill Island.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

combination spanner/single claw hammer

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

purpose made with large spanner at one end of handle and single claw hammer at other end

Paper Report, typed, 2 pages - Report on Visit to Property Owned Report On visit to Property Owned by Mr. H. Jenkins

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Report on visit to property owned by Mr. H. Jenkins, Churchill Island, regarding stock, pastures, crops, and recommendations, written by A.C.T. Hewitt on his visit to Churchill Island on 17.4.1942. Report enclosed with letter dated 1st May 1942 [Item Registration No. 0230]

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973

Significance

The report demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming and provides information on farming in the era.

Inscriptions & Markings

"under present conditions' [end 7th paragraph, 2nd page]

camp oven

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

oval shaped camp oven with swinging handle on body. Lid with D handle on top. Lip handle on one side of rim. Surface rust. Corrosion on edge of lid.

Historical information

Purchased at clearing sale

Inscriptions & Markings

CLARKE AND CO. With name there is a diamond cartouche with a tower and drawbridge and flag on top, "I" and "J" either side of tower. 4G under (four gallons)

lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Maltese bobbin (NGV) Bedfordshire Cluny style hand made plaited lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

open ended cast spanner. Heavy duty. Handle has 2 small drill holes

Inscriptions & Markings

7/8 on jaw

Grinder wheel on stand

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Grinder wheel, sandstone on wooden stand unpainted

adjustable wrench

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

twist design on handle; jaws bent out of shape and worn. Hand-made

Bag hanger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hoome made unpainted metal bag hanger with shearer plough wheels base. Ring to hold bag stored separately

Significance

Good example of farm improvisation

Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Green petrol engine with red trim and crank handle. Attached to green grain grinder

Scoop

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Crochet square

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand Crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.