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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214
Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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402 items

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood splitting wedge; commercially made; steel; surface rust; with relief groove

Historical information

Used with other wood cutting/splitting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan.

lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Linen Honiton mimic (NGV) hand made individual bobbin lace motifs hand sewn together with bobbin made brides (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Irish crochet handmade lace trim, ivory

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

large box spanner #2 cast; socket for extension. Shows screw marks from casting

Inscriptions & Markings

W E CARY LTD

section of drainage pipe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

section of terracotta drainage pipe, broken both ends.

Historical information

Possibly part of the dairy drainage from the Jeffery era, 1930s, when Churchill Island was a dairy farm

3D Viewer

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood and glass viewer to give three dimensional image from two identical photos placed in slot at other end to eye pieces

Historical information

May have been used by Amess or Jenkins families?

Paper Letter, typed

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Typed paper letter on Department of Agriculture letterhead, to Mr. H. Jenkins, dated 1st May, 1942, enclosing report with recommendations on visit to Churchill Island. Signed A.C.T. Heweitt, Live Stock Science Officer

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973

Significance

This letter demonstrates Harry Jenkins committment to farming at Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

A.C.T. Hewitt [bottom right hand corner]

Double furrow mould board plough

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Double furrow moud board plough, two wheels front, one rear, painted brown

Pole and swingle tree

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted timber pole; single metal swingle tree, surface rust

Drill Press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Orange drill press with cream wheel

Lace Piece trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

length of lace trim, off-white colour; hand-made Torchon (duster) lace; used on underwear

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Cheese Press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Metal cheese press, white

Paper Map

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand drawn map in pencil on paper of situation and measurements of land contained in Vendor's Title. Attached to solicitor's letter catalogue item No. 0108.1

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This document is an example of a hand drawn map of the era, measured in links.

Inscriptions & Markings

[signed] Hen B [bottom right hand corner]

Name Plate, Brass

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Rectangular brass name plate, one recessed screw hole per corner, used by Harry Jenkins for his dentist practice, Collins St, Melbourne.

Inscriptions & Markings

Front: "E.H. JENKINS / DENTIST" Reverse: "SRIATS RU" (UR STAIRS backwards)

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Garden barrow

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden flat tray

Historical information

Found in Amess Barn 1980s;

Significance

Typical of local farms

Farrier's nippers/nail pullers

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blacksmith's made black iron complete. Split end one handle; knob end other handle

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped: "7"

Bed jacket

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photos (4)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note "Fine cotton bed jacket. Hand embroidered scalloped edge."

Chiming pendulum wall clock

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden cased pendulum clock with two decorative gold coloured glass panel inserts above the clock face, which has brass hands and white enamel background to blue painted numbers. Small hook and eye fastener on left hand side to open clock face. Two heavy iron pendulums - one larger than the other. Turn wooden decorations on top half of case.

Historical information

This clock was donated to the Phillip Island & District Historical Society Inc by Sister Margaret Campbell on her departure from Churchill Island where she lived for many years. The clock had been owned by the owner prior to Sr Campbell, Harry Jenkins, and had passed to Sr Campbell with the property when Harry died in 1963. The society committee was asked by its secretary Christine Grayden, also curator of Churchill Island, if the clock could be returned to display in Amess House, and they agreed. The donation form was signed on behalf of the PIDHS by committee member John Jansson.

Significance

The clock was originally located in Amess House Churchill Island from the 1930s to 1973 when it was given to the Phillip Island & District Historical Society, who donated it back to Churchill Island in 2016.

Newspaper Supplement - "A Voyage of Discovery - Celebrating the Bicentenary of Lt. Grant's Journey into Western Port in the Vessel, the Lady Nelson"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

A special souvenir lift out from the Phillip Island and San Remo Advertiser Wednesday March 21, 2001 pp 13-16 (included). Includes bio of Lt. Grant; program of 200 year celebrations at Churchill Island and Rhyll; information about "Lady Nelson". Thursday March 22 - Sunday March 25, 2001. 2 copies.

10" Spofford Brace

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Iron carpenter's brace, metal handle, rotating knob, thumb screw, rusted

Inscriptions & Markings

ATMIEBON (x) Mathieson

Drill Press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Drill press, blue with orange wheel

Inscriptions & Markings

Dawn Manufacturing Co

Dump hay rake

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Red dump hay rake, white wheels, single horse, single row of rakes

Paling/shingle splitter's axe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made, painted black, cast. No handle. Shows signs of use. Socket warped

stamp

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood based metal stamp

Historical information

Stamp made for stamping stationery 1982 Churchill Island

Inscriptions & Markings

"CHURCHILL ISLAND DEVELOPMENT 1982"

Newspaper cutting - photocopy - "This Island Hideaway"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Article re: Churchill Island for sale. The Herald, Saturday May 12, 1973. Text by Ann Pilmer. Three photos by Ken Bainsbury. Small location map.

Wool press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden wool press with metal frame and mechanism

Cardboard panel of lace pieces x 5

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (5)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Noten packaged with panel "scraps of lace found jumbled in with this collection"

Amess Family Tree

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

30pp starting with Samuel Amess b. 1730 m. Elizabeth (Annison) 26/12/1750 at St Michael and All Angel's, Barton Turf, Norfolk, England - Jaxon Charles Doherty, 11th generation b. 7/10/2012. Plastic comb binding. Black and white. Compiled by Geoff Collier.

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made, floral pattern, possibly warratahs?

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Ames... read more

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women.

Thread cutter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Thread cutter with two handles. Adjusting screw inside jaw

Inscriptions & Markings

"V" punched in. Die: "7/16 V"

Double ended spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

stainless steel, some pitting. One end slightly smaller than the other

Wheat wagon

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blue wagon with red wheels with bag lifter operated from side of wagon with one horse

Significance

Typical heavy settler's wagon

Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Green petrol engine with red trim and crank handle. Attached to green grain grinder

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Stationary engine, red

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Sundial 2 h.p. engine, open crank 600 rpm Seral number 6420, red. Attached to yellow grain grinder

Historical information

Purchased by FOCIS

Significance

Typical of units used on local farms

Inscriptions & Markings

Sunshine McKay, 1925 Serial no. 6420

Horse-drawn mower

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black mower, offet draw bar, metal wheels

Open front upper undergarment

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Limerick lace. Square net- improcurable now. (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packed with note"Real Limerick Lace undergarment" and two notes in Janet Amess' writing see 0036

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

open ended cast spanner. Heavy duty. Handle has 2 small drill holes

Inscriptions & Markings

7/8 on jaw

Coolgardie type meat safe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Pale green enamelled meat safe fitted for Coolgardie curtains (not present) fittings and 3 sides for curtains. One internal shelf 1/2 way and base. Grids of holes square with cross shaped decoration to each grid. Some surface rust. Water reservoir on top.

Inscriptions & Markings

"PORTABLE PANTRY"

Hand drill

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand drill with red wheel, dark red paint remnants on handle

Inscriptions & Markings

BECON D129

Screwdriver

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black wooden handle, surface rust; paint worn off handle

Grindstone

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Grindstone pedal operated with timber stand

Historical information

Unit was in poor condition when VCT purchased Churchill Island. Was rebuilt by John McFee

Significance

Typical of unints used on local farms

Buck rake

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Timber buck rake, 6 prongs, metal fittings

Cigar holder

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Silver holder for 4 cigars awarded to Dr Harry Jenkins, owner of Churchill Island 1936-63.

Historical information

The item was awarded to Dr Harry Jenkins for a motorcycle race. Jenkins was a Great War air ace and racing driver and had a dental practice in Collins Street Melbourne. He owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This trophy demonstrates Harry Jenkins's reputed love of motor sport, speed and competition.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on centre 2 sections: MOTOR CYCLE CLUB OF NSW SCRATCH RACE 4 HP AND OVER H JENKINS 16-2-10 Also Hallmarks SYDENHAM PATENT 2272 A S

lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand-made individual bobbin made lace motifs hand sewn together with bobbin made brides. Cream coloured, Some stains,

Historical information

Worn by Jane (Janet) Amess. She and her husband Samuel owned Churchill Island from 1872-1879. Samuel was an Alderman of Melbourne City Council and Mayor in 1870. They used Churchill Island as a holiday retreat and built a substantial weatherboard dwelling there now known as Amess House. The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

This collar is part of a 94 piece collection of small lace items accumulated by four generations of Amess women, starting with Janet Amess in the 1850s.

Milking Machine Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Aqua engine case, surface rust, with driving wheels

Letter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Typed letter on Department of Agriculture, Victoria letterhead, addressed to Mr. E.H. Jenkins, regarding improvement of pasture land at Churchill Island, signed 'R.L. Twentyman,' Agrostologist, dated 9th April, 1941

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming and provides information on farming of the era.

Inscriptions & Markings

R.L. Twentyman [bottom right hand corner]