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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven VIC 3925 (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214; 03 5951 2800

Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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401 items

401 items

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

One of three wedges cut from one piece of steel. Blacksmith made.

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

Sea Chest

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden with hinged lid. Some paint stains. Most unpainted.

Historical information

Used by John Rogers on voyage from England to Australia. Subsequently used by Rogers family for storage.

Inscriptions & Markings

JOHN ROGERS/WANTED ON THE VOYAGE

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Bronze saw set with steel fittings and red paint on jaw. Meant for smaller saws

Inscriptions & Markings

Eclipse No 77 Made in England

Newspaper double page spread - p.12 "Bicentennial Celebrations at Rhyll" p.13 "Churchill Island Bicentennial Celebrations"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Pp. 11-12; 13-14 of Phillip Island and San Remo Advertiser. Captioned photos of activities on Churchill island and at Rhyll for the bicentennial celebrations of discovery of Churchill Island and Rhyll by Lt. Grant in 1801.

Bed jacket

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Motifs hand sewn on to machined net; bobbin tape on seams (NGV) Princess machine lace machine made motifs hand-appliqued on (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (4) See also 0086 cuff.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Machined lace bed jacket. Janet Amess 1860. From Kel Bright Collection with separated cuff".

Paling/shingle splitter's axe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made, painted black, cast. No handle. Shows signs of use. Socket warped

Wheat wagon

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blue wagon with red wheels with bag lifter operated from side of wagon with one horse

Significance

Typical heavy settler's wagon

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made lace trim made to look hand made. Some stretchiness

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Argus camera

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Camera owned by Dr Harry Jenkins with original box

Historical information

Possibly used to take photos of island activities which are held in archive

Significance

Used by Harry Jenkins to take photos of activities at this time.

Inscriptions & Markings

"argus/ seventy-five" at top on lens: ARGUS LUMAR 75mm MADE IN AUSTRALIA at side of front: INST/TIME

SICKLE

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Right handed sickle. Blade painted black. Handle varnished

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

combination spanner/single claw hammer

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

purpose made with large spanner at one end of handle and single claw hammer at other end

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Irish crochet handmade lace trim, ivory

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Cream Can

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

17lb metal cream can, surface rust. Hinged lid with handle. 1 handle either side.

Historical information

Used by Harry Jenkins/Margaret Campbell when Churchill Island was run by them as a shorthorn dairy farm.

Inscriptions & Markings

Side: "E H JENKINS CHURCHILL ISLD" Top of lid: "E H JENKINS" on one side, "CHURCHILL ISLAND"/"1612" on other side.

Lace Trim piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embrioderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by three generations of Amess women - Jane, Janet and Unity (Bright - donor). Jane was wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

Package contains note: FICCHU c1860/70 (hand made)

Grain hopper/grinder

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Yellow wooden hopper on black grinder with blue parts mounted on green stand. Attached by belt drive to Sundial engine

Book - thesis - "A History of Churchill Island Settlement, Land Use and the Making of a Heritage Site"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

A4 book, green hardback cover. Double sided print; b& w photos and maps

Significance

Dr Sanders's thesis outlines the various owners/occupiers of Churchill Island from 1850-1929. She describes the process of her research and collaboration with various parties in the process of developing her thesis.

Inscriptions & Markings

"To the Friends of Churchill Island Society past, present and future. Many thanks for your friendship and support. I could not have finished without you. The errors that remain (and there are likely to be some!) are all my own fault. I hope that this is of some use, even if I don't really solve the mystery of the location of the 1801 garden. May you forever "Preserve that which is precious". Rebecca, 14th May 2016".

mallet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Rough sawn replacement handle. Block has 2 rivets right through block on either side of handle. Chunk out of block on one side.

Horse-drawn mower

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black mower, offset draw bar, metal wheels

cross cut saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

steel blade, wooden handle and peg grip. Single person saw

Historical information

Donated by Wilfred Dungan on behalf of the Dungan family Collection originally used on the property of the late Dr Rae Dungan in Falls Creek Rd Olinda, purchased in the late 1930s from Olinda pioneers Harry and Minnie Holden. Also on the property of late May Farndon of Farndon’s and Falls Rd Mt Dandenong – aunt of Dr Rae William Dungan and also an early pioneer. Family holidays and weekends involved use of these sorts of farm implements plus working with horses. Post-war, the Olinda hand tools and machinery moved to the Shady Creek, Nilma North area where bush, pasture and cows had replaced the Olinda property. Wilfred well remembers being on one end of the crosscut saws cutting fence posts, logs and timber under “the tireless and vocal instruction” of a red headed local Darnum Rd legend called Harry Collyer. “He drove an old Rugby car and nearly pulled me through the logs with every cut!”

Baby bonnet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Strips of machine lace imitating bobbin lace; hand crocheted together. Crocheted rosettes. (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12).

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note; "Hand crocheted silk lined baby's bonnet" Lace fabric rayon?

Brace and auger bit for fencing

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Bit bolted on and held with hook. Brace probably blacksmith made. Bit commercially made. May have been used vertically. Surface pitted.

Furphy Water Cart

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Furphy water cart, unpainted with traces of red on embossed end

Historical information

Furphy carts were an important item in Australian agriculture, leading to the addition of the word "furphy" a misleading rumour (originally as spread from gossip around the water cart).

Inscriptions & Markings

On side of tank in black paint "CHRURCILL ISLAND" Embossed on end: Furphy water cart; makers Furphy & Sons, Shepparton and other inscriptions.

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood splitting wedge; commercially made; steel; relief groove; surface rust

Historical information

Used with other wood cutting/splitting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

one of three wedges cut from one piece of steel. No relief grooves.

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

LACE TRIM

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Lenth of lace trim with scalloped edge and straight selvedge edge, floral design on net ground. Machine made

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Diamond harrows

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Incomplete (three quarter) set of diamond (spike) harrows untainted metal