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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214
Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

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This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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400 items

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

double ended spanner. Box one end; open the other

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Chiming pendulum wall clock

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden cased pendulum clock with two decorative gold coloured glass panel inserts above the clock face, which has brass hands and white enamel background to blue painted numbers. Small hook and eye fastener on left hand side to open clock face. Two heavy iron pendulums - one larger than the other. Turn wooden decorations on top half of case.

Historical information

This clock was donated to the Phillip Island & District Historical Society Inc by Sister Margaret Campbell on her departure from Churchill Island where she lived for many years. The clock had been owned by the owner prior to Sr Campbell, Harry Jenkins, and had passed to Sr Campbell with the property when Harry died in 1963. The society committee was asked by its secretary Christine Grayden, also curator of Churchill Island, if the clock could be returned to display in Amess House, and they agreed. The donation form was signed on behalf of the PIDHS by committee member John Jansson.

Significance

The clock was originally located in Amess House Churchill Island from the 1930s to 1973 when it was given to the Phillip Island & District Historical Society, who donated it back to Churchill Island in 2016.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Three Quarter Yard Scoop

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Scoop, three quarter yard

Historical information

Recovered from San Remo property

Inscriptions & Markings

Gaston 3/4 Yard

Hay wagon

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Large hay wagon with steel shod wooden wheels

Potato digger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Potato digger, ground drive, single row

Significance

Typical of machines used in Gippsland

Inscriptions & Markings

Patent potato digger, winner of the first proize of 20. Martin's Cultivator Co, Stamford

Forge blower

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Forge blower painted red

Grindstone on metal stand

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Large sandstone grinding stone on metal stand , surfacew rust

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2) taken 30/12/11

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis. Keywords janet amess lace collection; lace; churchill island Statement of Significance

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Steel. Complete including spring. No manufacturer. One paint trace.

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

small wedge with substantial chip out of narrow end. Relief groove

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan.

Inscriptions & Markings

HYTEST FORGED TOOLS

Iron bound wooden mallet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Round wooden handle. Large head with metal band at each end. Some paint stains.

Notes from donor

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

2 pieces of notepaper See photocopy Packaged with 0025-26 and 0029

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

1) "The effects of my Great Grandmother Janet Amess, wife of Samuel Amess. Dated back to 1850s-60s. Unity Bright." 2) "To whom it may concern. My apologies for the creasing, discoloration and markings but they have inevitably come with age and I hope that someone with the skills to rectify the conditions somewhat can improve them. Thank you very much. U Bright"

Auger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

8 twists in the steel auger with cast iron chuck fused.

Inscriptions & Markings

Chuck: "2" Auger "16" "IRWIN MADE IN USA"

Bed jacket

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photos (4)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note "Fine cotton bed jacket. Hand embroidered scalloped edge."

Stationary engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blue green casing; two belt drive wheels; red wheels. Attached to green chaff cutter

Wool press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

All metal wool press, black

Petticoat

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine braid joined with hand ? or machine ? crochet chain joining (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (3)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Wedding petticoat. Hand crocheted. Handmade button holes. Pure cotton. Machined waist band".

Newspaper cutting - "Battle for bronze statue to honour port's naval past, rorts and all"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

P.3 of The Age, Monday Jan 25th, 2010. Article by Lorna Edwards. Photo of Mac Gregory by Jason South. Large photo of "Shenandoah" in Williamstown from US Navy Archives. Tells story of when Shenandoah came to Melbourne in 1865. Naval Heritage Foundation trying to raise $200,000 for sculpture to commemorate navy servicemen and the areas past in naval history.

Historical information

Samuel Amess was one of Melbourne society who entertained the Shenandoah officers and crew when in Melbourne. He claimed the Churchill Island cannon came from the Shenandoah.

Lace Piece trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Black beaded/sequined trimming

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

2 layers - one strong background with fine top layer with beadwork - hand or machine? (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Black beaded trimming (hand beaded)".

Screwdriver

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black wooden handle, surface rust; paint worn off handle

Hand seeder

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted metal hand seeder, one large wheel, surface rust

Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Green petrol engine with red trim and crank handle. Attached to green grain grinder

Scarifier hand hoe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden handles, unpainted metal wheel, hoe and fittings

LACE TRIM

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Length of lace trim with two straight selvedge edges, floral pattern interspersed with squares. Machine made

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Newspaper lift-out - "Bicentennial Celebrations at Rhyll" "Churchill Island Bicentennial Celebrations"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Two pages of text and photos on bicentennial celebrations of "Lady Nelson" entering Western Port. Pp 12-13. Pp10-11 local news and adverts. See also 0238.1-.9.

Fern hook

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Curved blade, painted black. Wooden limb handle, varnished, some white paint spots. Nail into handle in blade holder sleeve. Slight bulge in handle near blade holder

Historical information

Donated by Wilfred Dungan on behalf of the Dungan family Collection originally used on the property of the late Dr Rae Dungan in Falls Creek Rd Olinda, purchased in the late 1930s from Olinda pioneers Harry and Minnie Holden. Also on the property of late May Farndon of Farndon’s and Falls Rd Mt Dandenong – aunt of Dr Rae William Dungan and also an early pioneer. Family holidays and weekends involved use of these sorts of farm implements plus working with horses. Post-war, the Olinda hand tools and machinery moved to the Shady Creek, Nilma North area where bush, pasture and cows had replaced the Olinda property. Wilfred well remembers being on one end of the crosscut saws cutting fence posts, logs and timber under “the tireless and vocal instruction” of a red headed local Darnum Rd legend called Harry Collyer. “He drove an old Rugby car and nearly pulled me through the logs with every cut!”

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Incomplete. Bronze saw set with no fittings except striker. Red paint spots.

Inscriptions & Markings

Eclipse No 77. Made in England

Crochet square

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand Crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood splitting wedge; commercially made; steel; surface rust; with relief groove

Historical information

Used with other wood cutting/splitting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan.

Black on cream lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Paper Letter, typed

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Typed paper letter on Department of Agriculture letterhead, to Mr. H. Jenkins, dated 1st May, 1942, enclosing report with recommendations on visit to Churchill Island. Signed A.C.T. Heweitt, Live Stock Science Officer

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973

Significance

This letter demonstrates Harry Jenkins committment to farming at Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

A.C.T. Hewitt [bottom right hand corner]

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

log splitting wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

well used, slight surface rust. Octagonal shaft to collar then wedge. Top badly burred over from use.

Furphy Water Cart

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Furphy water cart, unpainted with traces of red on embossed end

Historical information

Furphy carts were an important item in Australian agriculture, leading to the addition of the word "furphy" a misleading rumour (originally as spread from gossip around the water cart).

Inscriptions & Markings

On side of tank in black paint "CHRURCILL ISLAND" Embossed on end: Furphy water cart; makers Furphy & Sons, Shepparton and other inscriptions.

shells

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

A variety of old and weathered shells stored in jar with label: "Original shells collected for paths by Sarah Rogers".

Historical information

Sarah and John Rogers were the second European inhabitants on Churchill Island with, and after the Pickersgills. Sarah laid out a garden and collected shells and shell grit to surface the garden paths. Possibly these are some of the shells she collected.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Original shells collected for paths by Sarah Rogers"

Iron wheel

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted iron whell designed for heavy loads

Book - "Rebel Down Under When the 'Shenandoah' shook Melbourne, 1863" by Cyril Pearl

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blue plastic covered dust jacket. 200pp. 8 black and white illustrations.

Inscriptions & Markings

Diane Tillen (?) 1973

Paper Licence Document - Motor Spirit Consumer's Special LIcence

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Paper Motor Spirit Consumer's Special LIcence issued by Commonwealth of Australia Liquid Fuel Control Board (Vic) to Edward H. Jenkins, Churchill Island via Newhaven, for International Tractor B. & P. Lighting Plant, Special Licence No. SP/33298, period 15/11/49 to 31/5/50

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates his interest in the farm and provides information on farming in the era.

Inscriptions & Markings

[stamped] RELIEF NO4; SAN REMO VIC 6FE50; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA: LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; LFOB CANCELLED VICTORIA; Ration Tickets may be drawn only at San Remo 9Post Office) [initialed] Authorising Officer 6-12-49 (Date) [front]

Newspaper double page spread - p.12 "Bicentennial Celebrations at Rhyll" p.13 "Churchill Island Bicentennial Celebrations"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Pp. 11-12; 13-14 of Phillip Island and San Remo Advertiser. Captioned photos of activities on Churchill island and at Rhyll for the bicentennial celebrations of discovery of Churchill Island and Rhyll by Lt. Grant in 1801.

twist drill bits X 8

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

A variety of sized drill bits, surface rust.

Tin snips

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Straight blades. Damaged end of one handle. Surface rust.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1.3.12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Label stuck on one end "4 1/2"

Petrol engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Dark gfreen with surface rust "Underwood" in white lettering on red background on tank.

Corset cover

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "White cotton camisole hand stitched seams. Probably purchased fabric pre 1900".

Neckband with attached FICHU

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Battenburg machine braid tacked on to net. Hand appliquéd lace motifs (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (5)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

double ended open spanner. One end has angled jaw. Other end rounded (for over shaft) with tabs for locking into place