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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

Links

Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photography depicting a group of six male students rehearsing with anaesthetic apparatus. Five of the students are standing and one student on the left of the photograph is sitting and holding an inhaler to his face. There are two apparatus displayed.

Historical information

Possibly part of a series of photographs taken at the Geoffrey Kaye Museum when it was located at the University of Melbourne in the late 1940s, photographer unknown. The photograph was reproduced in the book One Grand Chain : The History of Anaesthesia in Australia 1846 - 1962 : Volume 2 1934 - 1962, Gwen Wilson, edited by Jeanette Thirlwell Jones, on page 459.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: Frame 17 •Handwritten in blue ink on reverse: sample. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 2 [in a circle] •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 15 [in a circle, with the 5 crossed out] •Label which was originally glued to bottom on photograph which has since detached, written in all capitals with white ink on black paper: Students rehearsing with current apparatus, displayed in functional order and in section

Mask, Schimmelbusch

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oval shaped metal mask with a collapsible cross-shaped dome, hinged clamp and flat handle

Historical information

Curt Theodor Schimmelbusch (November 16, 1860 – August 2, 1895) was a German physician and pathologist who invented the Schimmelbusch mask, for the safe delivery of anaesthetics to surgical patients. In 1890, Schimmelbusch invented a mask for the delivery of anaesthetics to surgical patients. It was primarily designed for ether anaesthesia, but he also proposed its use for chloroform anaesthesia. Schimmelbusch designed a metal mask, over which a gauze could be stretched and secured. The mask was placed over the patient's mouth and nose, and anaesthetic was applied to the gauze, allowing the patient to inhale the anaesthetic as they breathed normally. Around the edge of the mask, a trough collected the residual anaesthetic, rather than allowing it to drip onto the patient's face.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into underside of handle: ELLIOTT SYDNEY

Analgesic, Provoprin

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small amber bottle with light blue plastic screw on cap with faded blue on white manufacturer's label adhered to the front of the bottle containing 25 tablets of Provopin [Aspirin].

Historical information

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication.

candlesticks

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pair of Ley Pewter candlesticks of medium size with round base

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved under each base: [FOR FAC. OF ANAESTH., R.A.C.S., BY G. KAYE. / LEY PEWTER, 1778-1978 [the 1778 date has been scratched out] One candlestick also has engraved: [NO. 2]

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph showing ten unidentified male students standing around a lecture theatre table watching the unidentified male instructor as he points to one of four anaesthesia apparatus, carbon dioxide absorbers.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Black paper label glued on top of photograph with caption written in all caps in white ink: Demonstration of apparatus (Carbon Dioxide absorbers, in section). •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: Frame 14. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 16. 14 has been crossed out.

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown and white coloured cardboard box with white and black manufacturer's label adhered to front with plastic tray inside box containing twelve (12) hypodermic needles.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into plastic tray: B-D TWIN PAK Stamped into flat section of connector: B-D 27 Stamped in red ink on inside base of box base: 6 MAR. 1965

Cylinder, Medical Compressed Air

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Empty small pale green painted cylinder with rounded base and attached outflow valve with circular 'On-Off' knob.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red paint across the main body of the cylinder: ST. VINCENTS 32510 Printed on manufacturer's label: 'KEEP CYLINDER COOL / CIG [logo] / MADE IN AUSTRALIA / MEDICAL AIR COMPRESSED / DO NOT ALLOW OIL OR GREASE ON VALVE / OPEN VALVE SLOWLY CLOSE AFTER USE

Hyoscine hydrobromide

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Three (3) small clear glass ampoules with red print on glass containing 1ml Hermette, Hyoscine Hydrobromide.

Historical information

Hyoscine hydrobromide was used before a general anaesthetic, particularly in the days of ether anaesthesia. It is sedating, decreases nausea and vomiting and dried secretions, particularly saliva. It made ether anaesthesia more pleasant for both patient and administrator.

Laryngoscope, Flagg

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Complete laryngoscope used by Dr Lennard Travers. Medium sized Flagg straight blade with a slight curve at the distal end and a 'U' shape canal. The handle has a serrated grip for easy use and it is also a container for two batteries, it has a switch on its base. The full piece has visible and deep scratches over the top of blade around the stamped blade type inscription. The base of the blade has a worn surface with a slight discolouration due its use. No presence of led light bulb on blade. Minor scratches on handle base battery deposit with an ON - OFF switch black button.

Historical information

Designed by Dr Paluel Flagg around 1915 and later used for 25 years. This laryngoscope blade was designed to meet certain expectations about laryngeal richness and to avoid major tracheal injuries in patients. (Ball, 2014) Article reference: C. M. Ball & R. N. Westhorpe. 2014. Anaesthesia & Intensive Care. Nov 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p687-688. 2p.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on blade, FLAGG LARYNGOSCOPE Stamped on top handle blade base, AUBURN, [W/A seal], N.Y.U.S.A. Stamped on the handle base power source button, ON [red colour], OFF [blue colour]

Tongue Depressor

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

J. Austen chrome plated tongue depressor blade only. Size 2 1/4, stainless steel material. The top arm of the instrument has a serrated grip below to facilitate tongue adherence, also has a middle space canal with semi circular welded rings to possibly introduce or attach an anaesthetic tube. This piece has in its internal lateral side engraved the possible owner's initial and last name. Minor scratches and dust marks are present over the piece as well as oxidation spots around engraved name. Weld spots in metallic semi circles edges on top of the piece.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the internal side of the handle, V. BRAND Stamped at the external side of the handle, J.AUSTEN / 2 1/4 / STAINLESS

Bottle, ACD Solution

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Clear glass bottle with white [discoloured] label on the front with red printed text. The bottle contains a yellowish solution. The metal screw-top lid has been covered with brown paper and a black rubber tie is draped around the shoulder of the bottle.

Historical information

Citrated blood was introduced by the Americans in 1917. This allowed blood administration to be delayed for up to two hours but there were many problems with transport, storage and infection in these early experimental days. This bottle contains ACD Solution (Anticoagulant Citrate Dextrose Solution) for ensuring blood doesn't coagulate during storage.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting an operating room with five doctors undertaking cardiovascular surgery. Four figures are standing in the background. One doctor is standing on the left of the photograph with a cardiopulmonary bypass machine in the foreground.

Blow gun

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hollow bamboo tube with mouthpiece at one end. The tube is decorated with intricate carvings with floral and geometric motifs. An organic fibre has been used to secure the mouthpiece and at several other points. The tube is a blowpipe for hunting.

Historical information

Used by the Sakai people, Kuala Langat, Selangor (Malaysia), 1936. Whilst Malaysian, this blow-gun is analogous to that used by Brazilian Indians with curare. The gun is of bamboo, with a highly polished inner tube of the same. The darts are reeds, made directional by knobs of a balsa-like wood, and poisoned with a mixture of brucine (from the ipoh, or upas tree) and cobra-venom.

Facemask

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pear shaped metal mask for attaching to Probyn Williams inhaler. The edge of the facemask is surrounded by a black leather cushion, with a tube on the top. The facemask is metal with a thumb action lever on connector.

Laryngeal Mask Airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Blue transparent plastic tubing with a clear plastic laryngeal mask attached. There is an additional fine tube threaded through the blue tubing toward the mask opening.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black ink on blue plastic tube: SIZE / 2.5 / MALLINCKRODT LaryngoSeal TM / Single Use Only 20 - 30kg

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is changing a mouth gag dental instrument in the patient's mouth. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and the hands of the anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Changing-Over the Gag. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photo. 4. / (Frame 20).

Goblet

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Solid silver, with pure gold overlaying the modeled stem and interior of the cup. Trefoil shaped goblet cup with tapering profile. The stem is supported by a sheaf of wheat and bird design. The goblet came in its own case with a booklet of authenticity.

Historical information

Dr. Dai Davies presented this Goblet as a gift to the Faculty as the first appointed Burnell-Jose visiting Professor, Postgraduate Committee in Medicine, S.A. May - June 1976. At the time, Dr Davies was the Consultant Anaesthetist St George's Hospital, London and during this event was elected to Honorary Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthestists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The Burnell-Jose Visiting Professorship commenced in Adelaide in 1975 in honor of Mary Burnell, the first woman Dean of the Faculty from 1966 to 1967 and the first woman President of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists in 1955. Very few women had assumed major anesthesia roles in the world during this period. The Goblet's provenance is supported by an original booklet, which certifies its origin from Chichester Cathedral (1075), Sussex, England. In 1975, a limited edition of 600 goblets were commissioned by the Dean and Chapter of Chichester Cathedral, Reverend Walter Hussey, to commemorate the ninth century of the Foundation. This Goblet is number 46 of the edition and the booklet is signed by Walter Hussey. The Goblet is historically associated with Chichester Cathedral and Walter Hussey, who was a great patron of the arts during the 1970's.

Inscriptions & Markings

[central base] NUMBER / 46 / OF A LIMITED EDITION / OF 600 MADE BY ORDER OF / THE DEAN AND CHAPTER / TO COMMEMORATE / THE NINTH CENTENARY OF / THE FOUNDATION OF / CHICHESTER CATHEDRAL / IN 1075 / AURUM / DCM [and hallmarks of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths] •[around base] D.M. DAVIES / ADELAIDE 1976

Inhaler, Clover (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal based chamber with glass dome top. There is a metal connection point at the top of the glass dome for a rebreather bag, with a whistle tip connection point at the base of the chamber for a facemask. There is no rebreather bag or facemask. There is a black plastic stopper to the side of the chamber, with a glass bulb with a metal wire cage covering.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII. This modified version differs from the original Clover inhaler as it has a glass dome chamber at the top allowing the level of ether to be monitored.

Certificate, Fellowship

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Printed certificate from the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) awarded to Robin William Smallwood as a Fellowship. Printed in black ink at the top of the certificate is the RACS coat of arms. The certificate is dated 25 Feburary 1965 and has been signed by President of the College, Member Executive Committee, Dean of the Faculty and the Secretary.

Historical information

Robin William Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness and was awarded the Orton Medal posthumously. The Orton Medal is the highest single achievement the College can bestow. Anaesthesia had its origins in October 1846 in America, by May 1847 news of ether anaesthesia had reached Australian shores and by June 1847 Australian medical practitioners had begun experimenting with and demonstrating ether anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not really recognised as a distinct branch of medicine in Australia until the first Diploma of Anaesthesia course began in Sydney in 1944. The specialty grew quickly and by 1952 the Faculty of Anaesthesia at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons had been established. Within 40 years the Faculty had grown to such an extent it became a College in its own right and continues to offer training and professional support to anaesthetists.

Laryngoscope, Magill

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This piece of equipment is made of stainless steel and has a canal on its left side and a handle to put batteries inside of it and it has attached a round screw to make it extendable. This object also has an stamped inscription and on the other side it has the manufacturer details.

Historical information

Magill laryngoscope with a battery in the handle was one of first of its kind

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped A.CHARLES KING.LTD Stamped REG.NO.749019 Stamped STAINLESS

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Leona Wilson wearing the Presidential medal without the Presidential gown. She is wearing the New Zealand Order of Merit medal on her left lapel. She has her hands clasped in front of her and is seated on an angle in a chair in front of a plain grey background. The painting is mounted in a thin black frame and sits in a box frame coloured brown and gold.

Historical information

Dr Leona Willson was the first female to be elected president of ANZCA (2008 - 2010) and the first New Zealander to hold the position. In 2011, Dr Wilson was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit in which she is proudly wearing this medal in the portrait. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Dr Leona Wilson which was unveiled at the ANZCA Council meeting June 2013. The artist, Jude Rae, is a Sydney based artist primarily known for her still life paintings, portraits and architectural interiors. Her artwork is held in major public and private collections in Australia, New Zealand, UK and USA.

Significance

Dr Leona Wilson was the first female ANZCA President and first President from New Zealand to hold the position.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Magill

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Magill type blade to fit Longworth handles adult size without light bulb. Attached hinge at the back of the blade. Visible hit marks mostly present at the back top of the blade and below. Worn contact stud on base and lateral side at the light bulb connection. Dust spots around the piece. It has stamped on the blade base the attachment type name.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped at the attachment base of the blade in cursive writing, Longworth

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting a group of five male surf lifesavers wearing lifesaving caps crouched down on a beach, administering oxygen through an inhaler and oxygen tank to a male lying on the ground. There are five male onlookers watching behind the lifesavers, four are standing and one is crouching.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed stamp in black in on reverse: AN / AUSTRALIAN / PHOTOGRAPHIC / AGENCY / PICTURE BY / DONALD MCPHEDRON / NEWSPAPER HOUSE - 44 PITT STREET. / SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA / TELEPHONE 8U 7341 / NEGATIVE NO. •Handwritten in blue ink on reverse: 4/621939.

Kimpton Brown flask

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Frosted, cylindrical glass flask with brown rubber stopper at top. A fluid outlet is located on the bottom of the flask and a narrow, horizontal and cylindrical valve is located below the flask rim. The flask contains a maximum volume of 600cc of fluid. The item was used in the collection and administration of blood transfusion procedures and the inside of the flask has a coating of paraffin wax to retard coagulation.

Historical information

The Kimpton Brown flask was first described in 1913; the first successful citrated blood transfusion occurred in November 1914.

Vial, Analgesic, Morphine Sulphate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two (2) narrow amber coloured glass vials with sealed cork stoppers containing small tablets of morphine sulphate. One vial is longer than the other but both have red on white adhered labels.

Historical information

Morphine sulphate is an opioid analgesic. It works by blocking receptors in the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system that are involved in the sensation of pain.

Book, Catalogue - A Catalogue of Respirators and Allied Equipment

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pale blue [discoloured] cardboard covered book with blue pages printed in black ink, bound by a staple through the spine.

Historical information

Undated catalogue outlining a range of respirators available through Garthur (London) Ltd.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on front cover: P. Penn

Medical Carry Box

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black cardboard box with handle and simple border decoration on top. Brass hinges at the rear and two brass hook clasps at the front. Interior is lined with black linen. Cardboard divider inside and square compartment in corner would have been used to hold a bottle of ether in place.

Historical information

A characteristic black, round topped box, to carry medical equipment with a divider which would have held a square, plain glass bottle. The donor, Dr. Holloway is known to have acquired much of Dr. Howard Jones' equipment. In 1930 Dr Howard Jones, M.B., B.S., (Lond.). Surgeon Anaesthetist to Charing Cross Hospital first described percaine in an article in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. According to Norman, J. in the British Journal of Anaesthesia, Jones was the first honorary secretary of the Association of Great Britain and Ireland, 'of spinal anaesthesia fame', and a leading practitioner in his day. He apparently committed suicide in 1935, there are references that he 'could not make a living from anaesthesia'. (Norman, 2002, 'An informal history of the first 25 years', The British Journal of Anaesthesia, 88 (3): 445-450) The maker of this medical box, Allen and Hanburys Ltd., was a British pharmaceutical manufacturer, founded in 1715, absorbed by Glaxo Laboratories in 1958.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in gold leaf inside lid: ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD / LONDON.W. / 48.WIGMORE ST

Painting - Dust Off

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on board of a scene in which a military helicopter is about to land with a group of soldiers in the foreground, one wounded and one soldier standing. A cargo military helicopter is in the distance flying away from the scene. The painting is set in a gold frame.

Historical information

The painting was donated to ANZCA in 1995 by Dr Bernard Dunn. Bruce Fletcher, from Melbourne Victoria, studied under William Dargie, who had been an official war artist during the second world war. Fletcher followed the same pathway as his mentor and was the first of two official war artists appointed during the Vietnam War. His artwork are held in the art collection of the Australin War Memorial, Canberra. The title of the painting, 'Dust Off' is a term adopted in Vietnam which refers to the medical evacuation of sick or wounded soldiers, from the field, by a helicopter. It was originally a radio call sign selected from a US Navy Signal Operations book in 1963. [ref. 'Medicine at War. 1950-1972'].In June 2012, a Royal Children's Hospital Anaesthetic Registrar attended a College Tour conducted by Dr Rod Westhorpe when he saw the painting and informed us that the term 'Dust off' emanates from the Korean War and is in fact the acronym for Decisive, Unwavering, Support to our Fighting Forces'. The painting was based on a black and white photograph taken in Vietnam in 1971. An image of the photograph is located in the electronic supplementary file.

Inscriptions & Markings

[plaque affixed to centre front of frame] DUST OFF \ BY BRUCE FLETCHER \ DEPICTING THE MEDICAL EVACUATION \ OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS FROM THE FIELD \ IN VIETNAM \ PRESENTED BY \ DR BERNARD L. DUNN

Boyle's Machine

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Green trolley on casters with flowmeter and vaporiser bottles attached to a stainless cross bar. There is a glass shelf at top of the trolley and a second glass shelf at base of trolley, above a pull out drawer. The pull out drawer contains 4 x black rubber masks, 3 x black rubber tubing connectors, 4 x seals, 1 a black corrugated rubber hose with red rebreather bag, red tube and masonite support board.

Historical information

This Boyle’s machine was made by the British Oxygen Company (BOC) in the 1950’s. The original Boyle's machine was invented by the British anaesthetist, Henry Boyle in 1917. His machine was a modification of the American Gwathmey apparatus of 1912, and became the best known early continuous flow anaesthetic machine. The Boyle’s machine was first made by Coxeter and Sons, under the direction of Lord George Wellesly, which was later acquired by the British Oxygen Company (BOC). Though a lot of changes have been made to the original design of the Boyle’s machine, the basic structure remains the same today.

Inscriptions & Markings

Tin plate attached to upper portion of trolley: THE / BOYLE / apparatus / BY THE BRITISH OXYGEN CO. LTD.

Laryngoscope, Shipway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Shipway’s metallic medium size laryngoscope with bulbous curved handle. The section connecting the handle to the straight blade has a screw. Lateral orifice to attached light bulb connection which is not present on this item. The surface is very rusty and quite battered, presence of oxidation on its surface and discoloration of the metal. Has an inscription about the manufacturer.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on its handle, MAYER & Co. LONDON

Vial, Hydrochloride of Cocaine

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small clear glass vial with cork stopper and discoloured [white] manufacturer's label with black printing. There is a small amount of white powder in the vial, presumably hydrochloride of cocaine as per label.

Historical information

Cocaine was the first topical anaesthetic. It quickly numbs the area after application. Synthetic drugs provide better local anaesthesia without negative side-effects of cocaine. It is now only used for nasal surgery to prevent bleeding.

Inscriptions & Markings

Black print on manufacturer's label: Hydrochloride of Cocaine / POISON / T. MORSON & SON / London England

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting an operating room with a group of doctors standing around an operating bed during cardiovascular surgery. A Boyle's anaesthetic machine is in the bottom right of the photograph.

Invitation - Invitation to a Garden Reception to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Invitation set to attend a garden reception to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, at Government House, Paddington, NSW. Set includes an official invitation, memento card, entree card and commemorative medal.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Curved MAC (Macintosh) HEINE laryngoscope blade with light bulb, size 4. Made in Germany with stainless steel materials. Minor scratches and hit surface marks are around the piece, mostly near the base of the blade. Connector point located at the base of the blade is slightly worn out.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the base of the blade back edge side, HEINE / STAINLESS / W.-GERMANY Stamped at the lateral back side of the blade, MAC 4

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is holding an instrument to the patient's mandible. An anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. A fourth person's hand is holding a mouth gag dental instrument in the patient's mouth. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and the hands of the anaesthetist and fourth person are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Depression of Mandible by the Operator. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photo. 5. / (Frame 22).

Pugh's inhaler - replica

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main container comprises an inverted funnel shaped glass jar that is connected to the top glass globe via an etched glass valve. Sea sponges are located within the glass vessel and the woven cloth tube is connected to the base of the glass container.

Historical information

Replica of original glass ether inhaler used by Dr William Russ Pugh in Launceston in 1847.

Significance

William Russ Pugh is credited with being the first person in Australia to administer ether as anaesthesia. Pugh created his own ether inhaler based on a report in the London Illustrated News, dated January 1847. The paper reached Pugh in May and by June he had already designed, made and used the ether inhaler. On 7 June 1847 he performed two surgeries using anaesthesia. He also had a journalist present to record the event.

Medal, Orton

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Die cast medal mounted in a hard blue velour base, with a wooden gold frame. The medal is placed inside the base, with a red velvet ribbon coming out from underneath, used for removing the medal. Underneath the medal is a two cent coin, stuck to the base. Where the medal rests is covered in red velvet as well.

Historical information

The Robert Orton Medal is awarded at the discretion of the Council of the College (formerly the Board of the Faculty), the sole criterion being distinguished service to anaesthesia. The award was established by the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, in 1967. Robin William Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness. Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. The Orton Medal was awarded posthumously.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded in relief around perimeter of medal: THE ROBERT ORTON AWARD R.A.C.S. •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: THE ROBERT ORTON MEDAL OF THE FACULTY / OF ANAESTHETISTS, ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE / OF SURGEONS, PRESENTED POSTHUMOUSLY TO / ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD AT THE R.A.C.S. / G.S.M. MAY 7 1989 •Stamped in black ink on reverse: PORT MELBOURNE PRINTS & FRAMING / 276 BAY ST., PORT MELBOURNE 3207 / TELEPHONE No 646 4000 •Etched around the rim of the medal: ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD OCTOBER 1987

Book, Catalogue - Anaesthesia Equipment

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Blue cardboard covered book with low sheen white pages. Bound using staples through the spine and star pins.

Historical information

Undated catalogue outlining anaesthetic apparatus designed and supplied by MIE (Medical and Industrial Equipment), London.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a drawing of the head of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record, Model J. The view is from the top looking down onto the machine, showing a round vaporiser with a valve attached to it and two round pressure gauges on either side. The recorder on the machine does not have a chart attached to it.

Historical information

The McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record was introduced in 1930, created by Dr Elmer I. McKesson.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in black ink the letters A - H on the surface, labelling each part of the machine.

Vase, Glassware

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two tear shaped clear vases, one with opaque yellow colouring on the outer edge and base, one with opaque green colouring on the outer edge and base.

Inscriptions & Markings

etched underneath the base - EDDIE

Laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal laryngoscope in two parts. A round hollow handle with a textured grip and a screwed in base for holding batteries. The metal blade screws in to the handle and has a moulded section for a small light bulb.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved in to top of blade, D.A. Engraved in to base of handle, B.T.S. / R.W.H. D.A. Stamped in top of the handle, PAT.NO.683731 Stamped in top of the handle, BRITISH [indecipherable]

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Professor Kate Leslie wearing the Presidential medal without the Presidential gown. She has her arms casually crossed in front with legs crossed, and is seated in front of a plain brown background. The painting is set in a wide timber frame.

Historical information

Professor Kate Leslie was ANZCA President from 2010 - 2012. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Professor Kate Leslie and was unveiled at the ANZCA staff Christmas event on the 15 November 2013. The artist, Robert Hannaford, is from South Australia and was a political catoonist. He has a long history of painting portraits of politicians and distinguished professionals in the field.

Inscriptions & Markings

[lower RHS] HANNAFORD '13

Mask, Spectacle frame

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal mask resembling spectacles with round frames and rounded ends of the arms to secure around the ear. There is a tube coming from each round eye frame to end in a curve that sits in the nostril. The other end of this tube has a rubber tube attached which meets in the middle via a metal connector.

Historical information

The use of a catheter for oxygen therapy was introduced by Arbuthnot Lane in 1907. However, its true value can be seen in its use during WWI. Masks were cumbersome and uncomfortable for the wounded and nasal delivery of oxygen was received more easily. The Tudor Edwards' Spectacle-frame was manufactured in London during the 1930s. Dr Penn recorded that it was an inefficient means of oxygen therapy because of the smallness of the nasal tubes.

Certificate, Fellowship, Anaesthesia

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Printed certificate from the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) awarded to Mark Cowley Lidwill as an Honorary Fellowship. Printed in black ink at the top of the certificate is the RACS coat of arms. The certificate is dated 26 June 1954 and has been signed by Harold R Dew, President of the College, and other members of the executive.

Historical information

Mark Cowley Lidwill was awarded an Honorary Fellowship in 1954 after his retirement to honour his working life.Mark Cowley Lidwill was born in England in 1878. His family moved to Melbourne in 1894. Lidwill studied medicine at the University of Melbourne, graduating with honours in 1902 and achieving a Doctorate in Medicine (MD) in 1905. Soon after graduation he moved to Sydney and in 1913 was appointed as the first lecturer in anaesthetics at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. That year Lidwill became the first person in the world to catch a black marlin with rod and reel. The event was celebrated in newspapers throughout the country and the marlin skeleton is now on display at the Australia Museum. Lidwill was also the designer of a machine which could deliver anaesthesia mechanically. Compact and portable, the machine delivered precise, although variable, concentrations of ether. Lidwill is also credited with developing the world’s first pacemaker. In a letter he wrote to Harry Daly in 1955, Lidwill was ambivalent about the fate of the machine: “No one would be bothered with it and they thought I was mad”.

Model, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

White rubber human model, with acupuncture points annotated across the model. Stored in lidded in a brown cardboard box with a decorated envelope which presumably held acupuncture needles.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is inserting a mouth gag dental instrument into the patient's mouth. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and hands of the anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Inserting the Gag under Vision. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse and underlined: Photo. 2.

Chinese Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Medium sized, round shaped vase, glazed red, possibly lacquerware, decorated with raised relief creme coloured dragons among scrolling clouds. Attached to a square brown plinth. Vase came with a perspex cover and presented in a red, fabric box decorated with gold flowers.

Historical information

This vase was gifted to ANZCA during a visit to the college by fifteen members of the Chinese Society of Anesthesiology (CSA). This visit signified an exchange of education, research and friendship. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the ANZCA President, David Scott, and the President of the CSA to signify the spirit of collaboration.

Goblet

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hand made gold gilded sterling silver goblet. The stem is designed in a rope like twist holding up a simple tempered cup. The hallmarks are punched on the outside of the cup.

Historical information

This goblet was gifted to the Faculty by Professor John Norman (UK) during the Combined Scientific Meeting (CSM) organized by Hong Kong College of Anesthesiologists (HKCA) with ANZCA, held in May 2001, Hong Kong. The goblet is a unique design by the Australian - born artist Stuart Devlin AO, CMG. Devlin is considered to be a significant contemporary gold and silversmith, having become well known as a London Designer in the '70s and '80s. His achievements include the Royal Warrant of Appointment as Goldsmith and Jeweller to the Queen of England granted in 1982.

Inscriptions & Markings

[hallmarks] SD / lion passant / lion's head / S

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown cardboard box with buff coloured manufacturer's label adhered to front and cardboard slide tray containing a metal tray with seven (7) needles attached. The tray is surrounded by clear plastic.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in black ink on manufacturer's label: Short Bevel

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who has received anaesthsia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is holding a dental suction hose and metal medical tray under the patient's mouth, who is leaning over the tray. An anaesthetist is holding an inhaler over the patient's nose. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Management of Vomiting. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photo. 8. / (Frame 29).