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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

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Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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346 items

Archie Brain laryngeal mask and airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Ovoid shaped black rubber layrngeal airway with orange access point stopper. Translucent rubber tube is glued into the airway and is cutaway within the internal space of the airway. The item is a prototype and the materials used to construct it are gathered from different medical items.

Historical information

Taking castings from the larynx of cadaver's, Archie Brain studied the anatomy and physiology of the upper airway in minute detail. He devised the Laryngeal Airway Marsk (LMA) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation. Since first gaining a patent in 1982, he produced over 1000 prototypes over the next 30 years in a constant effort to improve the device and patient safety.

Significance

The LMA is a recent innovation and provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and has made a significant contribution to safe airway management.

Inscriptions & Markings

The following text is present on the rubber tubing: 'EX 9.5 ORAL 12.9 USE ONCE Z79-IT 24 26 29'.

Mask, Wire, Murray

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Triangular shaped mask with hinged arm at point of triangle that connected to upper wire section via a hook. Known as Murray's Mask and used for the administration of chloroform. Mask is covered with linen (gauze) cloth onto which chloroform would be dropped.

Medal - Companion of the Third Class of the Order of St Michael and St George

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large white enamelled seven armed Maltese Cross set around a dark blue ring bearing the Latin motto 'Auspicium Melioris Aevi'. The obverse depicting St Michael standing on the devil and the reverse St George on horseback killing a dragon. The medal comes with its blue-crimson-blue ribbon folded and stored under the velour badge holder. Medal and ribbon are set and stored in its custom made black case with the badge acronym in gold lettering on the top of the case [C.M.G.]. There is a card with instructions for wearing the medal under the velour holder along with a note from Geoffrey Kaye to Harry Daley.

Historical information

In 1966 Harry Daly was admitted to the Order of St Michael and St George in recognition of over 35 years of service to medicine and anaesthesia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on internal satin lining: BY APPOINTMENT / TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN / MEDALLISTS / BY APPOINTMENT / H.R.H. THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH / MEDALLISTS. / SPINK & SON, LTD. / 5 - 7, KING STREET, ST. JAMES'S, / LONDON, S.W.1.

Inhaler, Clover

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Dome shaped metal chamber with a red leather face mask attached at one end and a metal elbow joint at the other, including a bulb for a rebreather bag and a tap mechanism.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on dome of chamber: Mayer & Meltzer / London / Clover's Inhaler •Stamped on flat base of chamber: 1 2 3 1 2 3

Laryngeal Mask Airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Yellow plastic tubing with a pink rubber laryngeal mask attached. There is an additional fine yellow tube threaded through the base of the rubber mask.

Historical information

The Laryngeal Mask Airway was invented in 1983 by British anaesthetist, Archie Brain.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black in along side: #4 LARYNGEAL MASK AUTOCLAVABLE INTAVENT 3:1

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Lindy Roberts seated in front of a plain brown background. She is facing front on with legs crossed, one hand over the other resting on her knee. She is wearing the Presidential medal which is slightly covered by her multi-coloured jacket of pink, grey and white. The painting is set in a wide timber frame.

Historical information

The painting was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Dr Lindy Roberts from 2012 until 2014. The artist Robert Hannaford has a long history of painting portraits of politicians and distinguished professionals in the field.

Inscriptions & Markings

[artist signature and date, lower RHS] HANNAFORD ' 13

Magill's laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This U-shaped chrome plated laryngoscope comprises an endotracheal tube used to facilitate access to the patient's airway, wire spring attachments and a cylindrical handle with provisions for battery to illuminate inside the body during use.

Historical information

This object is Magill's adaptation of the battery handle in the form of an "inserting tracheoscope". Introduced in 1935 for one-lung anaesthesia, it is combined with an endotracheal tube, the central part of which is a latex-covered wire spiral, and a bronchus blocker. In use, the tube was fixed to the holder and the whole apparatus inserted as a ttracheoscope. At the carina, the blocker was inserted into the bronchus and the balloon (now perished in this example) inflated. The holder was then removed leaving the endotracheal tube and blocker in place. The bronchus blocker consists of gum elastic on woven silver wire and has a suction channel opening at the tip. in other stages of development of Magill's laryngoscope, the original pattern blade was adapted to the battery handle, at first in a fixed arrangement and then with interchangeable blades of different sizes. Later still, the folding handle was introduced.

Inscriptions & Markings

Embossed on the central shaft of the item is 'A Charles King, Ltd', the maker's details.

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of Professor Teik Oh seated on a chair at an angle facing left, wearing the Presidential badge without the Presidential gown. Mounted in a plain gold frame.

Historical information

Professor Teik Oh was appointed ANZCA president in 2000 until 2002. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to commemorate the presidential term of Professor Teik Oh and was presented at the Anaesthesia Western Australia Annual Winter Scientific Meeting on the 7th August, 2004. The artist Ben Joel is a Western Australian artist, well known for his commissioned portraits and contemporary pieces in most media. Joel's artworks are represented in national private and public art collections.

Needles, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Twenty six (26) fine metal needles with twisted copper ends used for acupuncture.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a Bruck inhaler lying on its side on a wooden table. The metal inhaler is oval shaped with one half made of glass, and also has a vertical crosspiece. Lying next to the inhaler is a face mask and a filler for measuring ether.

Historical information

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Lambert Bruck.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a Minnitt gas/air analgesia apparatus, in a Queen Charlotte case. The case is standing open with the apparatus inside. A label with instructions is on the left side of the case, and the apparatus is on the right side of the case. A nitrous oxide cylinder tank and valve is connected to a small box with a regulator. A tube with a breathing mask is attached to the box. The Queen Charlotte case has hinges on the side and a handle on the top.

Historical information

Robert James Minnitt introduced the concept of self-administered analgesia, using an apparatus designed and built in conjunction with London scientific instrument-maker, Charles King. The Minnitt apparatus met with considerable success and led to further modifications, including the introduction of the Queen Charlotte gas-air analgesia apparatus in 1936, manufactured by the British Oxygen Company.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting a labour ward in a hospital, with two men in business suits standing on the left of the photograph next to an nitrous oxide machine. A woman patient is lying in a hospital bed on the right, wearing a hospital gown and holding the mouth-piece of the apparatus to her face. The two men are looking down at the equipment and the man on the left, Dr Kevin McCaul, is pointing at the patient, demonstrating the use of the demand flow nitrous oxide/oxygen apparatus. A lamp is above the bed and there are curtains behind the men on the left.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten on reverse in grey pencil: 1 [in a circle] •Printed stamp in blue ink on reverse: 51 4776 / PHOTOGRAPHED BY SPECIALIZED / PHOTOGRAPHIC / COMPANY PTY. LTD. / REF. No .................... 240 CHAPEL STREET / TAKE ........................ PRAHRAN, VICT., S1 / PHONE 51 4776 / 51 1752 •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: 4874 [next to REF. No] / D [next to TAKE]

Inhaler, Clover

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black round topped box with brass hooks at front and brass hinges at rear. There is a black fabric handle on the top. Inside the box is black padding with the manufacturer's logo printed in gold leaf. There is a square section in the base of the box for holding the square clear glass bottle for ether. There is also a dome-shaped metal inhaler with a "whistle tip" type connection to the mask. The mask is made of tan leather. There is also a metal ether measure for pouring the ether.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII. (Source: Wood Library Museum)

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in gold leaf inside lid of box: MAYER & MELTZER [?] PORTLAND ST. / MAKERS •Engraved on side of inhaler: Mayer & Meltzer / London •Stamped on connector of inhaler: MAYER & MELTZER RN NO 212327 •Engraved on rear of inhaler: Clover's Inhaler •Printed in white on blue sticker: O.2.5A •Measurements have been stamped on the bottom of the inhaler. •Printed in black ink on mask: MADE IN ENGLAND •Stamped on metal connector inside mask: 6 •Printed in black ink on white manufacturer's label on glass bottle: ETHER PURUS '720 / H. Francis & Co., Melbourne.

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Blue cardboard box with lighter blue manufacturer's label and blue cardboard slide tray holding four (4) needles. The slide tray has allocation for twelve (12) needles.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in red ink on manufacturer's label: RECORD Stamped into flat of needle: SOL / 24

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cream coloured metal tin with hinged side and manufacturer's information in red and black printed text on front of tin. Inside tin are twelve (12) needles on a metal tray which is wrapped and sealed with a plastic covering.

Probang

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This probang is constructed from metal and horsehair. The metal is coiled to enable flexibility and the proximal end has a metal finger grip for support. The distal end comprises a smooth metal tip and the strands of horsehair are designed to scoop strands of foreign material from the patient's pharynx.

Historical information

An instrument designed to remove swallowed foreign objects. The end containing horsehair is pushed past a foreign body in the oesophagus then expanded and withdrawn, bringing the foreign body with it.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Magill

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Magill type blade to fit Longworth handles adult size without light bulb and without hinge at the back of the blade. Visible dust veil over its surface with presence of small oxidation spots mostly over the blade canal and base. Almost non used contact studs on base and lateral side at the light bulb connection. It has stamped on the blade base the fitting type name and the place where it was made.

Historical information

“Penlon was founded as Longworth Scientific Instrument Co. Ltd, in 1943, in Oxford, by personnel from the Department of Anaesthetics at Oxford University.” (Ref. Retrieved from URL 2015: http://www.penlon.com/en/us/about/history.html )

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped at the fitting base of the blade in cursive writing, Longworth Stamped at the fitting base of the base in capital writing below the previous text, MADE [I]N ENGLAN[D]

Carving - Mauri Ora

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Traditional Māori carving in Rimu, a native New Zealand wood, with paua insets.

Historical information

Professor Alan Merry commissioned the work from New Zealand artist Heke Collier as a gift to the College at his retirement from Council. This artwork was carved by Heke Collier in May-July 2016. It is made from native New Zealand Rimu timber. Heke named this carving Mauri Ora which translates to vitality, well-being or the healing life-force. Tihei Mauri Ora (breath of life) is a well-known Māori saying that was uttered by the first human being. Māori believe that all people and all things have mauri. This carving symbolises the many shapes and forms of mauri with reference to the Māori creation story, and the spiritual and natural worlds. Māori refer to the heavens as Ranginui the sky-father and according to the Māori creation story, Ranginui was pressed against Papatūānuku the earth mother. Their children did not like living in the cramped, dark space between them. One of their sons Tāne separated Ranginui and Papatūānuku to allow light and life into the world. The central male figure carved into Mauri Ora (above) is Tāne. To his right (far right) is his mother Papatūānuku and to his left (far left) is his father Ranginui. Papatūānuku gives birth to all things including human kind and provides the physical and spiritual basis for life. The takarangi (spiral) design in the carving (to the left of Tāne) symbolises the life cycle. Whenua, the word for land also means placenta - organ that nourishes the baby in the womb. Women are associated with the land (whenua) because the land gives birth to people and so do women. In tribal history women have had influence over land and men. Papatūānuku is depicted in the carving to the right of Tāne. Ranginui played a pivotal role in the birth of the sun, moon, planets, stars and constellations – collectively called Te Whānau Mārama (the family of light). Human life and knowledge were said to originate in the realm of Ranginui. Tāne ascended the heavens to retrieve three baskets of knowledge: te kete-tuatea (basket of light), te kete-tuauri (basket of darkness) and te kete-aronui (basket of pursuit). Ranginui is depicted in the carving to the left of Tāne. Tāne had many different roles, and he was given different names to reflect these roles. He is called Tāne-mahuta as god of the forest, Tāne-te-wānanga as the bringer of knowledge, and Tāne-te-waiora as the bringer of life, prosperity, and welfare. His teachings and knowledge are relevant in contemporary times, and the cell-phone carved into his left hand represents this. Tuatara feature in the Māori creation story and some tribes view Tuatara as kaitiaki (guardians) of knowledge. Given that they have lived for more than 220million years. There are birds or manu surrounding Tāne in the carving, who represent Tane’s voice or the voice of the forest. The flax or harakeke depicted in the carving represent the family unit and reinforce the importance of kinship ties. There are plants, ferns, and birds carved into Mauri Ora play an integral role in the life-cycle which represent rongoa Māori or Māori medicine.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is inserting a mouth-pack into the patient's mouth. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. A fourth person's hand is holding the patient's mouth open with a mouth gag dental instrument. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and the hands of the anaesthetist and the fourth person are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Inserting the Mouth-Pack. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photograph 3. / (Frame 16).

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph showing Dr Geoffrey Kaye during a demonstration of monitoring during anaesthesia in 1932. Dr Kaye is fully gowned and masked and is seated behind the head of the patient who is lying down. Dr Kaye is holding a blood pressure monitor in his right hand which is attached to the patient's arm.

Historical information

The image, without a blackened out background was reproduced on page 21 in 'Practical Anaesthesia'. Practical Anaesthesia was the first text book on anaesthesia produced in Australia. Geoffrey Kaye was one of the contributors to this book, which included a foreword by F.H. McMechan, Secretary General, International Anesthesia Research Society. Blood pressure measuring enabled medicine to develop a greater understanding of shock and begin to develop more appropriate measures for resuscitation. Shock was not really understood until the introduction of routine blood pressure measuring in the early 20th century.

Significance

This item is historically significant because it is a rare photograph of Dr Geoffrey Kaye, as well as being reproduced in Practical Anaesthesia, the first textbook on anaesthesia to be produced in Australia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: Fig 1 new book

Salt and Pepper shakers

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

A pair of hand crafted red cedar salt and pepper shakers, each with a thin gold band above the base.

Historical information

Dr John Hains, presented these two shakers to Dr Neville Davis, President of ANZCA (1995 to 1996). Dr Hains expressed in his letter to Dr. Davis, how these two shakers are made from a red cedar branch which had fallen on his property in Queensland.

Inhaler, Analgesia, Penthrane

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wooden box with metal clasp and hinges and two sections inside, divided by balsa wood. One side contains an amber plastic and black rubber facial mask, along with a inhaler tube and felt square. The other side contains a cylindrical metal device with a black plastic handle secured to one end and a portal for attaching the facial mask at the other.

Historical information

Originally distributed by Abbott Laboratories. This device is used for the self-administration of Penthane, an analgesic. Designed for use in emergency rooms, obstetrics, orthopaedics and surgical outpatients.

Laryngoscope, MacIntosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Complete Macintosh laryngoscope piece with a curved medium sized attached blade with light bulb and a textured handle with serrated grip for easy of use and a screw in the blade connector. The handle is also a battery deposit to supply the led light bulb. The blade has general deep scratches on its surface and a slight metal deformation on top back of the blade. At the back of the blade is still attached the hinge that keeps in regular position the base and the blade, is also present a worn surface in this area. Green spots of dust and oxidation processes are present over the blade and the handle areas. A handle manufacturer stamp is located at the base of handle (see inscriptions for details).

Historical information

Object belonged to and was used by Dr Lennard Travers 1950-1970.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into base of handle: LONGWORTH INST. CO. / OXFORD / ENGLAND

Inhaler, Hewitt's (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Bowl shaped inhaler with a glass bowl base and metal dome top with a connector which appears to be for a rebreather bag. There is a metal switch at the base of the glass bowl to alter or regulate the flow.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into central tube: COXETER LONDON Stamped into side of metal dome: 6460

Certificate, Fellowship

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Printed certificate from the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) awarded to Robin William Smallwood as a Fellowship. Printed in black ink at the top of the certificate is the RACS coat of arms. The certificate is dated 25 Feburary 1965 and has been signed by President of the College, Member Executive Committee, Dean of the Faculty and the Secretary.

Historical information

Robin William Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness and was awarded the Orton Medal posthumously. The Orton Medal is the highest single achievement the College can bestow. Anaesthesia had its origins in October 1846 in America, by May 1847 news of ether anaesthesia had reached Australian shores and by June 1847 Australian medical practitioners had begun experimenting with and demonstrating ether anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not really recognised as a distinct branch of medicine in Australia until the first Diploma of Anaesthesia course began in Sydney in 1944. The specialty grew quickly and by 1952 the Faculty of Anaesthesia at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons had been established. Within 40 years the Faculty had grown to such an extent it became a College in its own right and continues to offer training and professional support to anaesthetists.

Magill's Endobroncheal Tube

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tightly wound wire spiral tube with metal 'T' nozzle at the opposite end.

Historical information

This endobronchial tube was invented by Sir Ivan Magill. It can be identified as pre 1948, as from that time on the wire spiral was eliminated from the body of the tubes. Sir Ivan Magill is famous for his involvement in modern anaesthesia. He worked closely alongside plastic surgeon Harold Gillies in the treatment of facial injuries sustained in World War 1. He was responsible for many items of anaesthetic equipment, but most particularly the single-tube technique of endotracheal anaesthesia.

Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Porcelain vase of bulbous form and narrow neck with gold trim on lip. Black and white hand painted scene of flying geese above a body of water surrounded by reeds.

Historical information

This vase was gifted to the Faculty by Dr Walter Wyndham Biggs upon his retirement from the Faculty Board in 1981. Dr Biggs was the first flying anaesthetist of the Flying Surgeon Service based at Longreach in central Queensland. The vase is hand painted by Dr Biggs mother, Bessie Biggs. The manufacturer of the vase, Furstenberg, is one of oldest and most renowned porcelain makers in Europe since 1747. Made in West Germany, the makers mark is found at the base of the vase marked with a blue under glaze symbol of a crown, script F and a number 9.

Inscriptions & Markings

[hand written on base in black ink] Handpainted / by / Bessie Biggs / 1981 [embossed on base] 7405/30 [Blue under-glaze on base] symbol of crown / cursive script F / 9 / FURSTENBERG / SEIT 1747 / WEST GERMANY [Artist signature on painted surface] B BIGGS

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting six male figures standing around a c1870 nitrous oxide gasometer. The second man from the right is holding and pointing to an inhaler connected to the gasometer, demonstrating it to the dental students.

Historical information

Possibly part of a series of photographs taken at the Geoffrey Kaye Museum when it was located at the University of Melbourne in the late 1940s.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in blue ink on reverse and underlined: Frame 11. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 12. [11 has been crossed out.] •Handwritten in blue ink on reverse: 5 (i) (c). •Black paper label which has separated from the photograph, written in white ink: A GASOMETER (C.1870) IS DEMONSTRATED TO DENTAL STUDENTS

De Ford Somniform Inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This inhaler is composed of metal and rubber. The oral mask and rubber covered nasal mask are connected to a curved rubber covered support that was placed on the patient's forehead to hold the inhaler in place. The gas was administered via a long tube; the terminus designed to allow for the placement of a vial containing the anaesthetic drug and a rebreather bag mount.

Historical information

The De Ford Inhaler was introduced in 1913 and was designed to allow anaesthesia to continue through the nose while dental surgery was happening.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inscribed on the back of the mouth inhaler: 'Dr De Ford's Universal Inhaler for Somniform Nitrous Oxide etc. E. De Trey & Sons Phila. PA U.S. Pat. Pending.'

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is holding the patient's mouth open with one hand and is holding medical equipment in the other. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only the anaesthetist's hands, Dr Kaye, and the patient are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Opening Mouth without a Gag. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse and underlined: Photo. 1.

Slide

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour slide mounted in white cardboard slide case. Image depicts modified Clover Inhaler with glass chamber, cloth rebreather bag and metal facemask.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in pencil: EMBLEY'S / 9448

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Leona Wilson wearing the Presidential medal without the Presidential gown. She is wearing the New Zealand Order of Merit medal on her left lapel. She has her hands clasped in front of her and is seated on an angle in a chair in front of a plain grey background. The painting is mounted in a thin black frame and sits in a box frame coloured brown and gold.

Historical information

Dr Leona Willson was the first female to be elected president of ANZCA (2008 - 2010) and the first New Zealander to hold the position. In 2011, Dr Wilson was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit in which she is proudly wearing this medal in the portrait. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Dr Leona Wilson which was unveiled at the ANZCA Council meeting June 2013. The artist, Jude Rae, is a Sydney based artist primarily known for her still life paintings, portraits and architectural interiors. Her artwork is held in major public and private collections in Australia, New Zealand, UK and USA.

Significance

Dr Leona Wilson was the first female ANZCA President and first President from New Zealand to hold the position.

Mask, Murray

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Triangular shaped wire mask covered by flannel. The flannel is sewn over frame and stitched around the base and along the vertical wire. The style and shape is similar to Murray's mask, which was used for the administration of chloroform, however this variation is not collapsible like Murray's mask.

Historical information

Seems to be a non- collapsible mask. Otherwise is a similar, thinner variety of Murray's mask, which was used for the administration of choloroform. John Murray was born in England, 1843 and described his wire mask in 1868 as a young chloroformist at Middlesex Hospital. It was wedge-shaped and made of thick wire and designed to be folded. The removable cover was originally made of several layers of flannel. Murray’s mask became very popular, especially in Australia, and was generally used with a single layer of flannel without an aperture or opening, as is this example. John Murray was an enthusiastic and innovative physician who also had an interest in nitrous oxide anaesthesia and conducted a series of experiments with J. Burdon Sanderson on dental patients comparing nitrous oxide to pure nitrogen. His career was short-lived and he died just before his 30th birthday. (Ball, C 1995, 'Cover Note: Murray's Chloroform Mask', Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vol. 23, No. 2, pg. 135)

EMO (Epstein, Macintosh, Oxford) Ether Inhaler & Vaporiser

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The apparatus is a round, barrel style object with three small rubber feet and a moulded handle over the top. It consists of a vaporising chamber, wick, ether level indicator, temperature compensating value, air bypass chamber and mixing chamber.

Historical information

The Epstein, Macintosh, Oxford vaporizer (EMO) was designed in 1952 by Dr H. G. Epstein and Sir Robert Macintosh of the Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics at the University of Oxford, with the aid of their technician, Mr Richard Salt. It was essentially a refinement of their earlier Oxford vaporizer and designed specifically to deliver ether in known concentrations, irrespective of the temperature of the ether. Robert Macintosh was born at Timaru New Zealand in 1897. In December 1915 he travelled to Britain and was commissioned in the Royal Scots Fusiliers, soon transferring to the Royal Flying Corps. He was shot down behind enemy lines on 26 May 1917 and taken prisoner, escaping several times. When the war ended he returned to medical school and qualified in 1924 as MRCS LRCP. Macintosh's initial intention was to be a surgeon, but soon after qualifying he developed an interest in the field of anaesthesia. Macintosh became the first professor of anaesthetics at Oxford although the university was at first against the appointment. He recruited the scientists Dr Kurt Mendelssohn and Dr H G Epstein and together they designed and built the Oxford vaporiser, a simple, portable, and accurate means of delivering varying concentrations of ether which was to see service in the second world war. He was knighted in 1955 and died at Oxford in 1989.

Inscriptions & Markings

Manufacturer's label on reverse: EMO, Longworth Scientific Inst. Co. Ltd. England. Serial No. 5878

Analgesic, Trigesic

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

White plastic cylindrical tube with red cap and red print. The tube once contained Trigesic [aspirin].

Historical information

In 1858 Edward R Squibb founded his own pharmaceutical laboratory in Brooklyn, New York. E.R. Squibb, M.D. was dedicated to the production of consistently pure medicines. Squibb retired in 1895 and passed most of the responsibility for managing the firm to his sons, Charles and Edward. The company became known as E.R. Squibb & Sons. In 1989 Bristol-Myers merged with Squibb, creating a global leader in the health care industry. The merger created Bristol-Myers Squibb company, which was then the world’s second-largest pharmaceutical enterprise. Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting four men in business suits on a beach, standing around a table displaying medical equipment and oxygen tanks. There are CIG oxygen tanks leaning upright against the table, and a display box containing oxygen tanks is on the ground in front of the table. There is another box displaying oxygen tanks, an open suitcase and a megaphone on the table. Three of the men are looking at the fourth man on the far right who is holding a piece of equipment. There is an ambulance from the Elwood Life Saving Club directly behind the men and other cars in the background.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 7 [inside a circle] •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 4902 •Printed stamp in blue ink on reverse: COPYRIGHT / This photograph may not be reproduced / without permission in writing from the / Editor of "The Age" / 233 Collins Street, Melbourne, and 117 / Pitt Street, Sydney •Printed in black ink on paper label which has detached from the reverse of photograph: ELWOOD LIFE SAVING CLUB / EQUIPMENT PRESENTATION: / Photo from the "AGE" dated 30th December, 1961, / showing the comissioning of Elwood Life Saving / Club's new Ambulance replacing one wrecked in / a collision and covering the presentation of a / State Government cheque for £1,000 by Mr. Baron / Snider, M.L.A. to cover the cost of this ambulance. / In the picture, Mr. Snider (right) inspects / equipment with - from left, the state secretary / of The Royal Life Saving Society of Australia / (Mr. E. A. Pleydell, M.B.E.), club secretary / Mr. Tom Manion, and club president Mr. Jack / Conabere.

Mask, Ether, Ferguson

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wire mask for ether inhalation. The handle for the mask is made from the same wire as the mesh and there is a circular wire ring above the mask.

Historical information

The inner dome of the Ferguson's mask was covered in an ordinary vaporising surface of gauze, while the outer tower (circular ring) was enveloped in a domette bag closing at the top to exclude the air so that the ether vapor could be concentrated.

Label, Cylinder

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large unused diamond shaped Austox label made for use on carbogen cylinders. Beige with a black border, and green and red lettering.

Inscriptions & Markings

Information printed on label: SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR MEDICAL USES. / AUSTOX [logo] / COMPRESSED / CARBOGEN / CO2..........% OXYGEN.......... / (The percentages stated above are subject to tolerance) / KEEP COOL [in red] / CONTENTS: Imperial Gallons / WARNING - Great caution must be exercised to prevent any oil entering the cylinder, or being applied to the valve or fittings. The use of oil may lead to a dangerous explosion. [in red] / Australian Oxygen & Industrial Gases / Pty. Ltd. / MELBOURNE

Bottle, Ether

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Amber coloured glass bottle with moulded ridges along the outer sphere. Bottle has cork stopper with metal top. White manufacturer's label is adhered to front of bottle with blue and red printed ink.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in red ink onto metal lid: WOOLWICH / ELLIOTT Stamped in black ink on manufacturer's label: JAN 1964

Vial, Analgesic, Morphine Sulphate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two (2) narrow amber coloured glass vials with sealed cork stoppers containing small tablets of morphine sulphate. One vial is longer than the other but both have red on white adhered labels.

Historical information

Morphine sulphate is an opioid analgesic. It works by blocking receptors in the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system that are involved in the sensation of pain.

Wine coasters

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

A pair of sterling silver wine coasters with a turned wood base.

Historical information

This pair of wine coasters were gifted by the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal College of Surgeons of England to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the first meeting of the FARACS in 1952. The hallmarks engraved on the silver verify the maker and date.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on both objects; PRESENTED BY / THE FACULTY OF ANAESTHETISTS R.C.S. ENG. / 1952-1977 [hallmark] LGS / character of lion / mark of leopards head / cursive script C / mark of Queen Victoria

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photography depicting a group of six male students rehearsing with anaesthetic apparatus. Five of the students are standing and one student on the left of the photograph is sitting and holding an inhaler to his face. There are two apparatus displayed.

Historical information

Possibly part of a series of photographs taken at the Geoffrey Kaye Museum when it was located at the University of Melbourne in the late 1940s, photographer unknown. The photograph was reproduced in the book One Grand Chain : The History of Anaesthesia in Australia 1846 - 1962 : Volume 2 1934 - 1962, Gwen Wilson, edited by Jeanette Thirlwell Jones, on page 459.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: Frame 17 •Handwritten in blue ink on reverse: sample. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 2 [in a circle] •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 15 [in a circle, with the 5 crossed out] •Label which was originally glued to bottom on photograph which has since detached, written in all capitals with white ink on black paper: Students rehearsing with current apparatus, displayed in functional order and in section

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is holding the patient's jaw and is placing an instrument inside the patient's mouth. An anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's jaw and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and the hands of the anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: It takes Two to support the Mandible. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse and underlined: Photo. 6. / (Frame 23).

Laryngeal Mask Airway, Ambu

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Green transparent plastic tube connected to a laryngeal mask

Historical information

This is a recent example of a Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). The LMA was invented in 1983 by British anaesthetist, Archie Brain. The LMA revolutionised anaesthetic practice and by 1995 had been used in excess of 100 million patients and was available in more than 80 countries throughout the world.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black ink on green plastic tubing: Ambu

Tongue Depressor

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

J. Austen chrome plated tongue depressor blade only. Size 2 1/4, stainless steel material. The top arm of the instrument has a serrated grip below to facilitate tongue adherence, also has a middle space canal with semi circular welded rings to possibly introduce or attach an anaesthetic tube. This piece has in its internal lateral side engraved the possible owner's initial and last name. Minor scratches and dust marks are present over the piece as well as oxidation spots around engraved name. Weld spots in metallic semi circles edges on top of the piece.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the internal side of the handle, V. BRAND Stamped at the external side of the handle, J.AUSTEN / 2 1/4 / STAINLESS

Medal, Dean

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Gold coloured oval shaped medal with the Faculty of Anaesthetists coat of arms on the obverse in relief. The owner's name has been engraved into the reverse. There is a thick, ribbed, navy blue ribbon connected to the medal by a circular ring at the top. The medal and ribbon are encased in a black velvet box with white satin lining on the inside of the lid and a red velvet cushion resting in the base.

Historical information

Robin William Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness. Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. The Orton Medal was awarded posthumously.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on reverse of medal: R.W. SMALLWOOD / 1986 - 1987

Inhaler, Probyn Williams

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Ovoid shaped metal ether inhaler device with a dark brown leather fask mask attached.

Historical information

In 1896 Robert James Probyn-Williams was appointed first honorary anaesthetist to the London Hospital and joined a select band of fulltime anaesthetists (26) in Great Britain. The Probyn Williams inhaler was a further modification of the Clover inhaler with narrow airways and rebreathing.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into inhaler: MAYER & MELTZER / LONDON

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown cardboard box with sliding insert containing hypodermic needles. On the front of the box is a buff coloured manufacturer's label with rust coloured print. On the rear of the box is a white coloured manufacturer's label with rust coloured print. The box has a thin strip of rust coloured plastic all the way around it. The insert has allocation for six needles but there are only four present.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in black ink on front of box: EXPLORING / 19 B.W.G. 3 INCH •Stamped into metal at flat of connector: ARNOLD / SS

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Rectangular red cardboard box with red cardboard sliding insert containing four (4) needles which appear to be of two separate types. White [discoloured] manufacturer's label adhered to front of box with red printed text and manufacturer's logo.

Inscriptions & Markings

Typed in black ink on yellow sticker stuck to side of box: 20 x 3in Handwritten in brown ink on manufacturer's label: [indecipherable] / doz / 20SWGx3"

Blade, Laryngoscope, Magill

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Magill type blade to fit Longworth handles adult size without light bulb. Attached hinge at the back of the blade. Visible hit marks mostly present at the back top of the blade and below. Worn contact stud on base and lateral side at the light bulb connection. Dust spots around the piece. It has stamped on the blade base the attachment type name.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped at the attachment base of the blade in cursive writing, Longworth