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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

Links

Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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Laryngeal Mask Airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Yellow plastic tubing with a pink rubber laryngeal mask attached. There is an additional fine yellow tube threaded through the base of the rubber mask.

Historical information

The Laryngeal Mask Airway was invented in 1983 by British anaesthetist, Archie Brain.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black in along side: #4 LARYNGEAL MASK AUTOCLAVABLE INTAVENT 3:1

Chevalier Jackson's laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The U-shaped laryngoscope comprises a moulded handle and a long endotracheal insert which has a small connector to allow for a light to illuminate the patient's throat. The item is chrome-plated.

Historical information

Chevalier Jackson was a surgeon who designed this laryngoscope. Jackson contributed a number of important innovations to direct laryngoscopy, while developing a unique mastery of the technique. Ultimately, he combined this endoscopic proficiency with open surgical techniques.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on connecting shaft: Jackson's Laryngoscope, 1901.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph displaying different anaesthetic equipment. At the top of the photograph is a dry-cell battery, two Jackon's laryngoscopes, one of which has been modified, and a lamp carrier which has been withdrawn from a laryngoscope. At the bottom of the photograph are two Magill's rubber catheters and two different types of gum-elastic catheters.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on reverse and underlined: Fig 39

Wine coaster

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Sterling silver wine coaster with ribbed pattern on top border and turned wooden base.

Historical information

In February 1984, Dean WM Crosby of ANZCA, admitted Dr. William Derek Wylie to the Honorary Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Derek Wylie is one of the best known British Anaethetists and during his career devoted much of his attention to medical negligence and its prevention. He lectured and wrote extensively and is noted as the co-author of one of the most widely read textbooks on anaesthesia, 'A Practice of Anaesthesia', which was translated into several languages.

Inscriptions & Markings

With gratitude DEREK WYLIE HON. FFARACS, 1984 Engraved on base: MAPPIN & WEBB LTD. Hallmarks [Makers mark/ image of lion passant/ image of lion head / cursive script L]

Inhaler, Hewitt's (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Bowl shaped inhaler with a glass bowl base and metal dome top with a connector which appears to be for a rebreather bag. There is a metal switch at the base of the glass bowl to alter or regulate the flow.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into central tube: COXETER LONDON Stamped into side of metal dome: 6460

Inhaler, Clover

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal domed chamber with a bulb attachment on an elbow joint for rebreather bag. There is also a connector for a facemask, but no facemask.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on dome of chamber: Clover's Inhaler / Mayer & Meltzer / London •Moulded in to metal at connector: MAYER & MELTZER RD. NO. 212327

Inhaler, Clover (sectioned)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cross section of Clover's inhaler attached to a circular metal base.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII. Dr Geoffrey Kaye sectioned equipment, enabling medical students to see the inner workings and gain insight into the engineering of the equipment.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten on white sticker at rear: P / 26 / B •White print on blue sticker: O.2.3. •Engraved on dome side of inhaler: G. Kaye sect. 1939.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of the side view of an anaesthetic machine, the Killian Apparatus. A glass flowmeter is on top of a white metal stand on castors. Hanging from the top of the machine are tubes connected to an inhaler bag with a netbag around it and a mouthpiece. A glass bottle is attached behind the machine and a metal stool is to the right of the machine.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in black ink on surface: THE KILLIAN APPARATUS.

Inhaler, Clover

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Dome shaped metal chamber with a red leather face mask attached at one end and a metal elbow joint at the other, including a bulb for a rebreather bag and a tap mechanism.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on dome of chamber: Mayer & Meltzer / London / Clover's Inhaler •Stamped on flat base of chamber: 1 2 3 1 2 3

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cream coloured metal tin with hinged side and manufacturer's information in red and black printed text on front of tin. Inside tin are twelve (12) needles on a metal tray which is wrapped and sealed with a plastic covering.

Cylinder, Medical Compressed Air

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Empty small pale green painted cylinder with rounded base and attached outflow valve with circular 'On-Off' knob.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red paint across the main body of the cylinder: ST. VINCENTS 32510 Printed on manufacturer's label: 'KEEP CYLINDER COOL / CIG [logo] / MADE IN AUSTRALIA / MEDICAL AIR COMPRESSED / DO NOT ALLOW OIL OR GREASE ON VALVE / OPEN VALVE SLOWLY CLOSE AFTER USE

Bottle, chloroform

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Empty brown bottle of chloroform, with brown glass stopper.

Historical information

Chloroform was a popular anaesthetic agent in the early period of medical anaesthesia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on manufacturer's label: CHLOROFORM / B.P. / ANAESTHETIC / POISON / CHLOROFORM SHOULD BE KEPT IN A COOL / AND DARK PLACE. / W. J. BUSH & CO., LIMITED / MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS / ASH GROVE, HACKNEY, LONDON / MADE IN ENGLAND

Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Porcelain vase of bulbous form and narrow neck with gold trim on lip. Black and white hand painted scene of flying geese above a body of water surrounded by reeds.

Historical information

This vase was gifted to the Faculty by Dr Walter Wyndham Biggs upon his retirement from the Faculty Board in 1981. Dr Biggs was the first flying anaesthetist of the Flying Surgeon Service based at Longreach in central Queensland. The vase is hand painted by Dr Biggs mother, Bessie Biggs. The manufacturer of the vase, Furstenberg, is one of oldest and most renowned porcelain makers in Europe since 1747. Made in West Germany, the makers mark is found at the base of the vase marked with a blue under glaze symbol of a crown, script F and a number 9.

Inscriptions & Markings

[hand written on base in black ink] Handpainted / by / Bessie Biggs / 1981 [embossed on base] 7405/30 [Blue under-glaze on base] symbol of crown / cursive script F / 9 / FURSTENBERG / SEIT 1747 / WEST GERMANY [Artist signature on painted surface] B BIGGS

Chinese Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Medium sized, round shaped vase, glazed red, possibly lacquerware, decorated with raised relief creme coloured dragons among scrolling clouds. Attached to a square brown plinth. Vase came with a perspex cover and presented in a red, fabric box decorated with gold flowers.

Historical information

This vase was gifted to ANZCA during a visit to the college by fifteen members of the Chinese Society of Anesthesiology (CSA). This visit signified an exchange of education, research and friendship. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the ANZCA President, David Scott, and the President of the CSA to signify the spirit of collaboration.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Soper

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

A Soper straight laryngoscope blade adult size with bulb only. The blade has minor scratches over its surface and below the arm's blade because of its use. Presence of an old sticky tape mark under the blade. The contact stud at the base of the blade is worn. The end of the blade has a perforated line as part of its design. The metallic base of the light bulb has an oxide spot on it. No inscriptions.

Inscriptions & Markings

No inscriptions

Eyebath

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small glass container with a round base, extending into an oval shaped opening

Carving - Mauri Ora

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Traditional Māori carving in Rimu, a native New Zealand wood, with paua insets.

Historical information

Professor Alan Merry commissioned the work from New Zealand artist Heke Collier as a gift to the College at his retirement from Council. This artwork was carved by Heke Collier in May-July 2016. It is made from native New Zealand Rimu timber. Heke named this carving Mauri Ora which translates to vitality, well-being or the healing life-force. Tihei Mauri Ora (breath of life) is a well-known Māori saying that was uttered by the first human being. Māori believe that all people and all things have mauri. This carving symbolises the many shapes and forms of mauri with reference to the Māori creation story, and the spiritual and natural worlds. Māori refer to the heavens as Ranginui the sky-father and according to the Māori creation story, Ranginui was pressed against Papatūānuku the earth mother. Their children did not like living in the cramped, dark space between them. One of their sons Tāne separated Ranginui and Papatūānuku to allow light and life into the world. The central male figure carved into Mauri Ora (above) is Tāne. To his right (far right) is his mother Papatūānuku and to his left (far left) is his father Ranginui. Papatūānuku gives birth to all things including human kind and provides the physical and spiritual basis for life. The takarangi (spiral) design in the carving (to the left of Tāne) symbolises the life cycle. Whenua, the word for land also means placenta - organ that nourishes the baby in the womb. Women are associated with the land (whenua) because the land gives birth to people and so do women. In tribal history women have had influence over land and men. Papatūānuku is depicted in the carving to the right of Tāne. Ranginui played a pivotal role in the birth of the sun, moon, planets, stars and constellations – collectively called Te Whānau Mārama (the family of light). Human life and knowledge were said to originate in the realm of Ranginui. Tāne ascended the heavens to retrieve three baskets of knowledge: te kete-tuatea (basket of light), te kete-tuauri (basket of darkness) and te kete-aronui (basket of pursuit). Ranginui is depicted in the carving to the left of Tāne. Tāne had many different roles, and he was given different names to reflect these roles. He is called Tāne-mahuta as god of the forest, Tāne-te-wānanga as the bringer of knowledge, and Tāne-te-waiora as the bringer of life, prosperity, and welfare. His teachings and knowledge are relevant in contemporary times, and the cell-phone carved into his left hand represents this. Tuatara feature in the Māori creation story and some tribes view Tuatara as kaitiaki (guardians) of knowledge. Given that they have lived for more than 220million years. There are birds or manu surrounding Tāne in the carving, who represent Tane’s voice or the voice of the forest. The flax or harakeke depicted in the carving represent the family unit and reinforce the importance of kinship ties. There are plants, ferns, and birds carved into Mauri Ora play an integral role in the life-cycle which represent rongoa Māori or Māori medicine.

Inhaler, Snow (replica)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The complete object is in six parts and made up of a brass metal box with swing latches in the middle section for secure closing. The lid is in two parts with one half that comes off entirely. Inside the box is the circular inhaler, detachable tube and dark yellow/green fabric covered tube. The mask made of brass and chamois leather with an exporatory valve does not fit into the box. A brown fabric case has been made to store the inhaler in.

Historical information

John Snow was England's first full-time anaesthetist. He noted that the common mode of administration of ether was liable to lead to anoxia, and invented this inhaler to overcome this. Later, he turned to chloroform anaesthetics without a death. He administered chloroform to Queen Victoria for the birth of Prince Leopold, this largely being responsibe for overcoming objections to the use of analgesia in childbirth. This replica was made in 1950 and gifted to the museum by A Charles King Esquire.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched onto the detachable lid, This replica of the Snow's Ether Inhaler of 1847 was made by John Henry Hawkes of A. Charles King Ltd. August 1950.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a man sitting at a table where he is studying the workings of an Oxford vaporiser which is in parts, and reading the accompanying information panel. There is other anaesthetic equipment around him.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in black ink by Geoffrey Kaye on reverse: Frame 20. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reserve: 23. 20 has been crossed out. •Caption on bottom of photograph written in white ink on black paper and glued down: HOW THE WHEELS GO ROUND.

Portable hypodermic kit

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Kit comprises a thin metal case with rounded corners and flip top cover. Within it is housed an ornately decorated glass and metal hypodermic syringe, needle and five slender amber coloured glass corked vials. The vials contain hypodermic tablets of morphine sulphate, apomorphine hydrochloride, morphine atropine and strychnine sulphate.

Inscriptions & Markings

The metal syringe is inscribed with patent and manufacturing information: 'PARKE DAVIS & CO. / PAT AUG 25 1885'. The needle is inscribed with 'P. D. & CO.' and the base with 'PARKE, DAVIS & Co. / DETROIT & NEW YORK'.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting a labour ward in a hospital, with two men in business suits standing on the left of the photograph next to an nitrous oxide machine. A woman patient is lying in a hospital bed on the right, wearing a hospital gown and holding the mouth-piece of the apparatus to her face. The two men are looking down at the equipment and the man on the left, Dr Kevin McCaul, is pointing at the patient, demonstrating the use of the demand flow nitrous oxide/oxygen apparatus. A lamp is above the bed and there are curtains behind the men on the left.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten on reverse in grey pencil: 1 [in a circle] •Printed stamp in blue ink on reverse: 51 4776 / PHOTOGRAPHED BY SPECIALIZED / PHOTOGRAPHIC / COMPANY PTY. LTD. / REF. No .................... 240 CHAPEL STREET / TAKE ........................ PRAHRAN, VICT., S1 / PHONE 51 4776 / 51 1752 •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: 4874 [next to REF. No] / D [next to TAKE]

Plaque

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Plaque with inscription engraved on gold plated relief on silver, attached to a wooden base. An image of an engraved Chinese dragon wrapped around a rose on centre panel.

Historical information

Dr Ronald Lo, President of the Hong Kong College of Anaesthesiologists presented Dr Peter Roessler, on behalf of ANZCA, with a plaque commemorating the Inaugural Annual Scientific Meeting in 1994.

Inscriptions & Markings

On Front: THE HONG KONG COLLEGE OF ANAESTHESIOLOGISTS / HONG KONG COLLEGE OF ANESTHESIOLOGISTS HKCA / PRESENTED TO THE / AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND / COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS / ON THE OCCASION OF / THE INAUGURAL / ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING / IN / LAUNCESTON, TASMANIA, AUSTRALIA / APRIL/MAY 1994 On reverse, manufacturer label: Chinese characters / CHOI HON SAN CO. / TEL: 3809459 / FAX : 3977519

Vaporiser, Tecota

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Khaki metal multi layered cylinder. Set on top of khaki metal plate with four (4) rubber feet.

Historical information

Used by mothers during childbirth, the anaesthetic Trilene (trichloroethylene) was inhaled through a face mask [missing] attached to the rubber tubing [missing] and the vaporising chamber. The Trilene was poured into the chamber to be turned into a vapour. The machine was used in the obstetric wards at University College Hospital, London. Trilene was introduced in the 1940s. The machine was made by Cyprane Ltd.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in red on top level of vaporiser: Cyprane Ltd •Stamped in red on serial plate: TECOTA MARK 6 / CHARGE WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE B.P. / CYPRANE LTD. SERIAL No / KEIGHLEY / YORKS. / T1469 •Clear sticker with red printed text stuck on metal plate: PAT No 646680 / PATENTS PENDING

Tongue depressor, Lack

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Lack model metallic tongue depressor. General deterioration over its surface with presence of scratches, worn surfaces mostly at the edges of the piece, oxidation spots and resin plasters around the handle base with dust and fabric fibers glued to it. It has a serrated surface bellow the blade to facilitate tongue adherence. It has an adult medium size. No inscriptions or further details are present to determine manufacturer or owner.

Atomiser, De Vilbiss

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Red, heavy cardboard box with manufacturer's label at one end, containing a glass bottle with metal spray attachment, and a khaki rubber bulb for pumping liquid through the atomiser.

Historical information

Dr. Allen De Vilbiss (1841-1917) of Toledo, Ohio, developed his first atomiser around 1887. This device was designed to allow for dissolving cocaine, as a local anaesthetic agent, in oil, and spraying into the nose and throat. In the early to mid 20th Century, The DeVilbiss Company began making perfume atomisers instead of medical ones.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into top of metal atomiser: DE VILBISS TOLEDO USA

Boyle-Davis gag tongue depressor

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Stainless steel tongue depressor with tightly curved distal end and slightly curved L-shaped proximal end. Includes a provision for an electronic light source to illuminate indside the patient's mouth.

Inhaler, Probyn Williams

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Ovoid shaped metal ether inhaler device with a dark brown leather fask mask attached.

Historical information

In 1896 Robert James Probyn-Williams was appointed first honorary anaesthetist to the London Hospital and joined a select band of fulltime anaesthetists (26) in Great Britain. The Probyn Williams inhaler was a further modification of the Clover inhaler with narrow airways and rebreathing.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into inhaler: MAYER & MELTZER / LONDON

Laryngoscope, MacIntosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Curved laryngoscope blade and handle. The laryngoscope blade is identified as a MAC 3 RIESTER blade and is attached to the textured handle with a serrated grip for ease of use. The handle is also a battery deposit which has stamped on the lid base the manufacturer's name and the place where it was made.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the lid base of the handle, Penlon R [trademark] / Made in U K Printed on the blade base, MAC 3 RIESTER Printed on the blade base, STAINLESS STEEL C E / GERMANY Stamped on the blade base, TDD Stamped on the blade base, G

Ormsby's Inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler consists of an india-rubber flexible bag enclosed within a net bag to limit expansion. There is a soft metallic mouthpiece with india-rubber tubing around the edge. The tubing had to be purchased separately from the manufacturer. The body contains a wire cage with a similarly shaped hollow sponge into which ether was poured.

Historical information

Lambert Ormsby was a New Zealand surgeon who migrated to Ireland. He described his inhaler in a letter to the Lancet in 1877.Ormsby listed the advantages of his inhaler as simple, inexpensive, small quantity required to produce sleep, prevents evaporation of ether, portable and small (can be carried in pocket), short time to complete anaesthesia (two minutes) and safe. Disadvantages of this apparatus were that it had to be removed in order to recharge the sponge with ether or when anaesthesia becomes too deep. Considerable carbon dioxide accumulation developed and there would also be some oxygen lack. In thirty years of use, Ormsby's Inhaler underwent certain modifications, an exhalation valve was fitted to the mask and device for recharging the sponge with ether was later added. The Ormsby inhaler was modified by Carter Braine in 1898 with the aim of making it easier to clean. Essentially it is very similar except there is no net around the bag.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maker's details inscribed into metal ring around the bore: Barth Co. London.

Inhaler, Hewitt

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tall black round topped box with brass hooks at the sides and brass hinges at rear. There is a brown fabric handle on the top. The box has red padding inside the lid and red lining inside the base and sides. There is a round section in the base of the box for holding the round clear glass bottle for ether. There is also a ellipse-shaped metal inhaler on small metal base with a thin metal handle and pipe with bakelite plug attached via a small metal chain. A brown mask is made of brown leather and celluloid which is connected to the inhaler. There is a metal ether measure for pouring the ether.

Historical information

Sir Frederic W. Hewitt (1857-1916), an accomplished and well respected English anesthesiologist, was an expert in the function and use of the Clover Ether Inhaler. In 1901, Hewitt described his modification of the Clover Inhaler. Often referred to as the Hewitt Wide-Bore Inhaler, Dr. Hewitt introduced changes in order to make it easier to breathe through the device and improve the ventilation of oxygen and carbon dioxide. In 1901, Hewitt was recruited to anesthetize King Edward VII for emergency abdominal surgery. This was just a day or so before the new King was to be coronated. He recovered well, and Hewitt became the first anesthesiologist ever to be knighted. (Source: Wood Library Museum)

Inscriptions & Markings

On notecard in box: (B) HEWITT'S INHALER 1895, MADE BY GEO. BARTH & CO LTD., ADVERTISED AS THE SOLE MAKERS OF THE INHALER AND RECOGNISED BY HEWITT IN HIS TEXT BOOK - ANAESTHETICS AND THEIR ADMINISTRATION - AS THE MAKER OF HIS INHALER. / GIVEN BY DR. E.S. HOLLOWAY IN 1951, WHO ACQUIRED MUCH OF HOWARD JONES' EQUIPMENT AFTER THE LATTER'S DEATH. Stamped on underside of glass bottle in a circle: WUBW [illegible] Blue sticker on inhaler: O.2.13. Printed on inhaler under handle: Geo Barth [illegible] / SOL [illegible] Printed on body of inhaler: Full Printed on body of inhaler: 1/2 Printed on inside of leather mask: F35