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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

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Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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Bottle, chloroform

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Empty brown bottle of chloroform, with brown glass stopper.

Historical information

Chloroform was a popular anaesthetic agent in the early period of medical anaesthesia.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on manufacturer's label: CHLOROFORM / B.P. / ANAESTHETIC / POISON / CHLOROFORM SHOULD BE KEPT IN A COOL / AND DARK PLACE. / W. J. BUSH & CO., LIMITED / MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS / ASH GROVE, HACKNEY, LONDON / MADE IN ENGLAND

Inhaler, Snow (replica)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The complete object is in six parts and made up of a brass metal box with swing latches in the middle section for secure closing. The lid is in two parts with one half that comes off entirely. Inside the box is the circular inhaler, detachable tube and dark yellow/green fabric covered tube. The mask made of brass and chamois leather with an exporatory valve does not fit into the box. A brown fabric case has been made to store the inhaler in.

Historical information

John Snow was England's first full-time anaesthetist. He noted that the common mode of administration of ether was liable to lead to anoxia, and invented this inhaler to overcome this. Later, he turned to chloroform anaesthetics without a death. He administered chloroform to Queen Victoria for the birth of Prince Leopold, this largely being responsibe for overcoming objections to the use of analgesia in childbirth. This replica was made in 1950 and gifted to the museum by A Charles King Esquire.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched onto the detachable lid, This replica of the Snow's Ether Inhaler of 1847 was made by John Henry Hawkes of A. Charles King Ltd. August 1950.

Pugh's inhaler - replica

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main container comprises an inverted funnel shaped glass jar that is connected to the top glass globe via an etched glass valve. Sea sponges are located within the glass vessel and the woven cloth tube is connected to the base of the glass container.

Historical information

Replica of original glass ether inhaler used by Dr William Russ Pugh in Launceston in 1847.

Significance

William Russ Pugh is credited with being the first person in Australia to administer ether as anaesthesia. Pugh created his own ether inhaler based on a report in the London Illustrated News, dated January 1847. The paper reached Pugh in May and by June he had already designed, made and used the ether inhaler. On 7 June 1847 he performed two surgeries using anaesthesia. He also had a journalist present to record the event.

Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small cream coloured, round vase with brown glazed rings around the shoulder of the vase.

Historical information

The vase was made from the liquefaction that came out of the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011. The vase was gifted to the College by Professor Edward Shipton (known as Ted) on his retirement as Dean of the Faculty of Pain Medicine, and from Council. Professor Shipton is from New Zealand. The gift was accompanied by a card with the following inscription: "Thank you for allowing me to be a small part of your great institution as Councillor and Faculty Dean these past two years. My gift to the College is a small vase. This vase was made from the liquefaction that came out of the 22 February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake. It pays tribute to the medical personnel, our Fellows and Trainees that gave so much during that time to preserve life and relieve suffering. Sincerely Edward (Ted) Shipton"

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of the head of a portable Foregger "Metric" Gas Anaesthesia Apparatus. The apparatus has glass flowmeters and controls for fine and coarse oxygen, cyclopropane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. There is also an ether container and a blood pressure nanometer.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: Dr. Desai's Special Metric •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: III. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: dvpd.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of two unidentified male trainee anaesthetists in what looks like is the Australian Society of Anaesthetists headquarters at Mathoura Road Toorak. One man is seated with a book of diagrams in front of him and the other is standing next to him pointing at an image in the book.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Black paper label glued on bottom front of photograph, written in white ink in capitals and captioned: "He's wrong; and here's why". •Handwritten in black ink on reverse and underlined: Frame 17. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 20. [17 has been crossed out.]

Model, Hand, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Rubber model of hand in sealed plastic bag which is original packaging. Hand is marked with acupuncture points on the palm and back of the hand. A leaflet is enclosed inside a plastic box with a white base and clear lid.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting an operating room with five doctors undertaking cardiovascular surgery. Four figures are standing in the background. One doctor is standing on the left of the photograph with a cardiopulmonary bypass machine in the foreground.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a Carter Braine modification of the Ormsby inhaler, sitting on a wooden table. The mask inhaler has a black rubber tubing around the mouthpiece, a metal cap and a wire net containing a natural sponge.

Historical information

The Ormsby inhaler was modified by Carter Braine in 1898.

Mask, Julliard

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large metal wire frame mask, covered in waxed paper, with gauze wrapped around the rim to prevent ether leaking out, effectively forming a rebreathing apparatus.

Historical information

This is a large metal framework covered in gauze, the whole mask completely enclosing the patient's face excluding any possibility of carbon dioxide being excreted. This object was found in the possession of the Italian Army in Libya in 1940, and donated to the museum by Dr Geoffrey Kaye. Gustave Julliard, of Geneva, after a death from chloroform had occurred in his practice, abandoned the use of that anaesthetic and adopted ether. He administered it from a large, wire frame, the outside of which was covered with waxed cloth to make it impermeable to air, the inside with surgical gauze on to which the ether was poured.

Inhaler, Clover

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal domed chamber with a bulb attachment on an elbow joint for rebreather bag. There is also a connector for a facemask, but no facemask.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on dome of chamber: Clover's Inhaler / Mayer & Meltzer / London •Moulded in to metal at connector: MAYER & MELTZER RD. NO. 212327

Stopcock, Hewitt

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown leather facemask attached to metal inhaler and stopcock device that has been sectioned to reveal its inner workings. The various exposed channels have been painted either green, red, blue or purple.

Historical information

When Hewitt introduced his regulating stopcock in 1887, attempts were made to dilute the nitrous oxide with air and so obviate the element of asphyxiation. The method was to be seen in London, mainly in dentistry and minor surgery, so late as 1930. It was not very successful. To give even 10% of oxygen (which is not enough) the gas-mixture must contain 55% of air and 45% of nitrous oxide. The latter is thus so diluted by atmospheric nitrogen as to be incapable of producing anaesthesia except by asphyxiation. "Gas-air" was confined to analgesia, for example in midwifery. (Source: Penn catalogue)

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved into side of stopcock: HEWITT'S / N20-02 / 1895 / G. Kaye sect. 1952. •Stamped into other side of stopcock: [indecipherable] BARTH & CO. / SOLE MAKERS / 54. POLAND STREET LONDON.W.

Bottle, Blood transfusion

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Round, clear glass bottle with white [discoloured] paper label, with red printed, and metal screw-top lid.

Historical information

Dr Alan Holmes á Court enlisted in the Australian Army in 1916 as a medical officer with the rank of Captain. In 1918, Holmes á Court was promoted to Major and attached to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance on the Western Front. As the front advanced, the Casualty Clearing Stations became further removed from the battlefield, creating an urgent need for immediate resuscitation prior to transfer back to the CCS. In June 1918, Holmes a Court and his colleagues established a forward resuscitation team. The team consisted of one doctor trained in surgery, blood transfusion and resuscitation, another doctor trained in anaesthesia, resuscitation and blood classification, and four other assisting staff. This team moved out to the wounded, rather than waiting for them to be stretchered back. They provided on-the-spot, life-saving resuscitation. The wounded were then transported back to the Casualty Clearing Station or Regimental Aid Post for further treatment. Among the assorted surgical and resuscitation equipment carried by the forward resuscitation team, were a number of Kimpton-Brown flasks. Blood was collected from patients with minor injuries using the flask. It was then administered to those in need, after establishing their blood type. Citrated blood was introduced by the Americans in 1917. This allowed blood administration to be delayed for up to two hours but there were many problems with transport, storage and infection in these early experimental days.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten on white [discoloured] paper label: Phillip HARRIS Moulded into the top of the screw-top lid in red ink: RED CROSS BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Bellamy Gardner mask with Ogston frame

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Open wire ether mask with inner dome (Bellamy Gardner mask) and outer wire frame tower (Ogston frame).

Historical information

The Bellamy Gardner mask was in use by 1905 and was the first British mask for the open administration of ether. This mask combines the features of the Bellamy Gardner mask with a tower frame designed by Ogston. The Museum's "Penn catalogue", circa 1970, describes this mask: "this followed closely upon Ferguson's lead, but has an enormous amount of "dead-space" contained within the apparatus."

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into connector clip: BRITISH MAKE

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph depicting six male figures standing around a c1870 nitrous oxide gasometer. The second man from the right is holding and pointing to an inhaler connected to the gasometer, demonstrating it to the dental students.

Historical information

Possibly part of a series of photographs taken at the Geoffrey Kaye Museum when it was located at the University of Melbourne in the late 1940s.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Handwritten in blue ink on reverse and underlined: Frame 11. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 12. [11 has been crossed out.] •Handwritten in blue ink on reverse: 5 (i) (c). •Black paper label which has separated from the photograph, written in white ink: A GASOMETER (C.1870) IS DEMONSTRATED TO DENTAL STUDENTS

Anaesthetic, Novocain

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Square brown glass bottle with round neck and organ rubber stopper. A strand of wire has been wound around the stopper. A discoloured white manufacturer's label is stuck to the front of the bottle with black and red printed text. There is approximately half the liquid remaining in the bottle.

Historical information

Novocaine is a local anaesthetic for dentistry. Its first known use was 1906.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into the bottom of the bottle: J282

Mask, Ether, Ferguson

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wire mask for ether inhalation. The handle for the mask is made from the same wire as the mesh and there is a circular wire ring above the mask.

Historical information

The inner dome of the Ferguson's mask was covered in an ordinary vaporising surface of gauze, while the outer tower (circular ring) was enveloped in a domette bag closing at the top to exclude the air so that the ether vapor could be concentrated.

Book, Catalogue - Catalogue of Surgical Sundries, Theatre Equipment, Ward Furniture, Sterilizing Apparatus

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Red bound book with black printed text, and green and white internal pages

Historical information

Catalogue of surgical and anaesthetic equipment from the 1950s

Inscriptions & Markings

Typed in black and red ink onto fly page added to book: RETURN TO: / N. PALLATT, / ALLEN & HANBURYS (AFRICA) LTD. / 1956.

Model, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

White rubber human model, with acupuncture points annotated across the model. Stored in lidded in a brown cardboard box with a decorated envelope which presumably held acupuncture needles.

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of Associate Professor Neville J Davis, seated at an angle, wearing the Presidential gown and badge. The backdrop is plain with a mock outline of a window. Mounted in a plain gold frame with a brass plaque affixed to center of frame

Historical information

Associate Professor Neville J Davis, was appointed President of ANZCA in 1995 until 1996. Professor Davis was a member of both the last Board of the Faculty and the first Council of the newly formed Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Further information about Professor Davis can be found on Lives of the Fellows,http://anzca.online-exhibition.net/fellows/fellows-1992/neville-james-davis/ The artist Ben Joel is a Western Australian artist, well known for his commissioned portraits and contemporary pieces in most media. Joel's artworks are represented in private and public art collections.

Inscriptions & Markings

[plaque] ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR / NEVILLE J DAVIS / PRESIDENT 1995-1996

Chinese Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Medium sized, round shaped vase, glazed red, possibly lacquerware, decorated with raised relief creme coloured dragons among scrolling clouds. Attached to a square brown plinth. Vase came with a perspex cover and presented in a red, fabric box decorated with gold flowers.

Historical information

This vase was gifted to ANZCA during a visit to the college by fifteen members of the Chinese Society of Anesthesiology (CSA). This visit signified an exchange of education, research and friendship. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the ANZCA President, David Scott, and the President of the CSA to signify the spirit of collaboration.

Manometer, Mercury

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This blood pressure kit is housed in a rectangular, vinyl covered box with metal handle and press-stud lid release mechanism. The lid opens upwards and the glass blood pressure valve and plastic scale is attached to the underside of the lid. The measurements are written in black and go up in increments of ten, from 0 to 300. The glass valve has unidentified increments labelled in red, which is housed within a metal cylinder. The bellows is attached to the measuring valve via a dark green pressure cuff and rubber hose.

Historical information

In the 1600s, William Harvey realised a finite amount of blood circulates in one direction through the body. Jean Léonard Marie Poiseuille introduced the mercury hydrodynometer in the early 1800s for measuring blood pressure. Karl von-Vierordt created the sphygmograph in 1855 and, in 1881, Samuel von Basch created the sphygmomanometer, distinct improvements on the hydrodynometer. In 1896, Scipione Riva-Rocci developed the mercury sphygmomanometer. American neurosurgeon, Harvey Cushing, was an early adopter, and advocate for monitoring patients during surgery and anaesthesia. Blood pressure monitoring is still an essential component of evaluating a patient’s condition.

Inscriptions & Markings

Blue sticker affixed inside the kit: JOHN MARUM Ornate manufacturer's label: THE ARMOURED / ELLISCO / SPHYGMOMANOMETER / MADE BY / ELLIOTTS & AUSTRALIA DRUG / [indecipherable] LTD / CENTEN[indecipherable] MODEL

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Plastic wrapped and sealed packet of twelve (12) hypodermic needles woven into a cardboard tray and wrapped in an orange manufacturer's label with black and white printed text.

Probang

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This probang is constructed from metal and horsehair. The metal is coiled to enable flexibility and the proximal end has a metal finger grip for support. The distal end comprises a smooth metal tip and the strands of horsehair are designed to scoop strands of foreign material from the patient's pharynx.

Historical information

An instrument designed to remove swallowed foreign objects. The end containing horsehair is pushed past a foreign body in the oesophagus then expanded and withdrawn, bringing the foreign body with it.

Congo Red Solution

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown cardboard box with pink manufacturer's label adhered to front and text printed in black. The box contains an amber coloured bottle with blue wax seal and pink manufacturer's label with black printed text. There is also a clear glass dropper.

Historical information

Congo Red Solution was used to test the purity of Avertin before use. Avertin is a rectal anaesthetic that was used heated which could created dibromacetaldehyde and hydrobomic acid, the former being highly corrosive to rectal mucosa. Once this was known it was recommended that the solution should not be heated above body temperature and should be tested with Congo Red prior to use.

Plaque

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Plaque with inscription engraved on gold plated relief on silver, attached to a wooden base. An image of an engraved Chinese dragon wrapped around a rose on centre panel.

Historical information

Dr Ronald Lo, President of the Hong Kong College of Anaesthesiologists presented Dr Peter Roessler, on behalf of ANZCA, with a plaque commemorating the Inaugural Annual Scientific Meeting in 1994.

Inscriptions & Markings

On Front: THE HONG KONG COLLEGE OF ANAESTHESIOLOGISTS / HONG KONG COLLEGE OF ANESTHESIOLOGISTS HKCA / PRESENTED TO THE / AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND / COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS / ON THE OCCASION OF / THE INAUGURAL / ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING / IN / LAUNCESTON, TASMANIA, AUSTRALIA / APRIL/MAY 1994 On reverse, manufacturer label: Chinese characters / CHOI HON SAN CO. / TEL: 3809459 / FAX : 3977519

Painting, portrait - Professor Michael J. Cousins

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas painting of the Faculty of Pain Medicine Dean, Professor Michael Cousins set in a plain gold wooden frame.

Historical information

This is a portrait of Professor Michael Cousins in his role as Dean of the Faculty of Pain Medicine at ANZCA (1999 - 2002). The portrait was unveiled at a College ceremony/meeting on 30 July 2003. The portrait was commissioned by FPM to mark the Deanship of Prof Cousins. Gary Lee Gaston is an Australian visual artist who was born in 1938. He is a painter, teacher and sculptor. He has exhibited in Adelaide and is a fellow of the Royal South Australian Art Society.

Significance

Professor Michael Cousins was instrumental in the establishment of the faculty of pain medicine and was its first Dean from 1999 - 2002.

Inscriptions & Markings

hand written on the reverse in black ink - 762 x 632 / VM24 OIL liNen •stamped on reverse in black ink: CENTRAL ARTISTS SUPPLIES / 45 Osmond Terrace / Norwood SA 5067 / Phone/Fax: 8364 2088 •hand written on reverse in black ink: GARY LEE-GASTON / O.A.M F.R.S.A.S.A. •hand written on reverse in balck ink: PROFESSOR COUSINS 2003 / A.M. MB BS MD (SYD.) FFPMANZCA. FANZCA. FRCA. •engraved onto brass plaque on front of frame: Professor Michael J. Cousins / Inaugural Dean / 1999 - 2002 •inscribed on lower right hand side of painting: artist's signature

Inhaler, Bruck

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler is oval shaped with two halves. One half should be made of glass [missing] to allow observation of the ether level. A vertical cross tube, 22mm in diameter passes between the face-piece and the bag [broken]. There is a stopcock for admission of oxygen or nitrous oxide opposite the bag attachment. There is a central tube, 28mm in diameter, with controllable ports on either side.

Historical information

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Lambert Bruck. Bruck added a glass dome which enabled the level of ether to be monitored during administration. This was a revolutionary change as it removed guess work from the process.

Inscriptions & Markings

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Ludwig Bruck. Bruck added a glass dome which enabled the level of ether to be monitored during administration. This was a revolutionary change as it removed guess work from the process.

Inhaler, Hewitt

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tall black round topped box with brass hooks at the sides and brass hinges at rear. There is a brown fabric handle on the top. The box has red padding inside the lid and red lining inside the base and sides. There is a round section in the base of the box for holding the round clear glass bottle for ether. There is also a ellipse-shaped metal inhaler on small metal base with a thin metal handle and pipe with bakelite plug attached via a small metal chain. A brown mask is made of brown leather and celluloid which is connected to the inhaler. There is a metal ether measure for pouring the ether.

Historical information

Sir Frederic W. Hewitt (1857-1916), an accomplished and well respected English anesthesiologist, was an expert in the function and use of the Clover Ether Inhaler. In 1901, Hewitt described his modification of the Clover Inhaler. Often referred to as the Hewitt Wide-Bore Inhaler, Dr. Hewitt introduced changes in order to make it easier to breathe through the device and improve the ventilation of oxygen and carbon dioxide. In 1901, Hewitt was recruited to anesthetize King Edward VII for emergency abdominal surgery. This was just a day or so before the new King was to be coronated. He recovered well, and Hewitt became the first anesthesiologist ever to be knighted. (Source: Wood Library Museum)

Inscriptions & Markings

On notecard in box: (B) HEWITT'S INHALER 1895, MADE BY GEO. BARTH & CO LTD., ADVERTISED AS THE SOLE MAKERS OF THE INHALER AND RECOGNISED BY HEWITT IN HIS TEXT BOOK - ANAESTHETICS AND THEIR ADMINISTRATION - AS THE MAKER OF HIS INHALER. / GIVEN BY DR. E.S. HOLLOWAY IN 1951, WHO ACQUIRED MUCH OF HOWARD JONES' EQUIPMENT AFTER THE LATTER'S DEATH. Stamped on underside of glass bottle in a circle: WUBW [illegible] Blue sticker on inhaler: O.2.13. Printed on inhaler under handle: Geo Barth [illegible] / SOL [illegible] Printed on body of inhaler: Full Printed on body of inhaler: 1/2 Printed on inside of leather mask: F35

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record. The chart is for patient R.W's anaesthetic record, a 31 year old male for a right inguinal hernia operation on 2/5/1938. The anaesthetist listed is K. The chart lists the times and notes from the procedure, starting at 10.22am and ending at 11.27.