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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

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Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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348 items

Laryngoscope, Lynah

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Lynah's Ovoid Laryngeal Speculum with the light bulb and part of the connection wires still attached. Its semi square shape is characteristic of this kind of instrument, also has an screwable pointed end attachment. It has dusty and grey spots inside the canal of the blade near the light bulb canal. Solder spots are visible at the top of the blade as attachment of the laryngeal speculum blade base. General discolouration over the surface of this piece and hit marks present at the base of the handle. It was roughly engraved over the handle the owner’s details and year. Stamped at the base of the handle are the manufacturer’s details partially visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the handle, U N N A M E T . A D E L A I D E . c. 194[6] . Stamped at the base of the handle, [first line worn away might be MADE BY] / E / A D / [might be an S] YDN [might be an EY] / CHROME PLAT [incomplete word due stamp near the edge]

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Mottled brown cardboard box containing twelve (12) metal needles woven through a metal tray and covered in clear plastic.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on front cover of box: ML172

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a drawing of the head of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record, Model J. The view is from the top looking down onto the machine, showing a round vaporiser with a valve attached to it and two round pressure gauges on either side. There are blood pressure tubes attached to the sides of the machine. The recorder on the top of the photograph has a chart attached to it with written details.

Historical information

The McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record was introduced in 1930, created by Dr Elmer I. McKesson.

Inscriptions & Markings

Each part of the machine has been labelled and handwritten in black ink the letters A - H and J - P on the surface.

Laryngoscope, MacIntosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Complete Macintosh laryngoscope piece with a curved medium sized attached blade with light bulb and a textured handle with serrated grip for easy of use and a screw in the blade connector. The handle is also a battery deposit to supply the led light bulb. The blade has general deep scratches on its surface and a slight metal deformation on top back of the blade. At the back of the blade is still attached the hinge that keeps in regular position the base and the blade, is also present a worn surface in this area. Green spots of dust and oxidation processes are present over the blade and the handle areas. A handle manufacturer stamp is located at the base of handle (see inscriptions for details).

Historical information

Object belonged to and was used by Dr Lennard Travers 1950-1970.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into base of handle: LONGWORTH INST. CO. / OXFORD / ENGLAND

Syringe

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small ornate metal syringe with raised ridge at either end and in the middle. Tapers to a point at the distal end with pencil like extrusion. Finger ring at the proximal end.

Historical information

Charles Gabriel Pravaz (1791-1853) was a French orthopedic surgeon and inventor of the hypodermic syringe. In 1844, Irish physician Francis Rynd (1811-1861) invented the hollow needle. In 1853, French physician Charles Pravaz developed the first practical metal syringe. Pravaz added a fine, hollow needle to the end of his syringe instead of the tube. This was an important innovation. Yet in the pre-antiseptic era it was a mixed blessing. The use of injections rather than oral drug administration can more readily promote the spread of disease as well as facilitating its cure. An understanding of the germ theory of disease - and the cardinal importance of using sterile needles - awaited the discoveries of Lister, Pasteur and Koch. But intravenous injection allows extremely rapid pain-relief - and the induction of general anaesthesia when suitable agents were developed.

Goblet

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hand made gold gilded sterling silver goblet. The stem is designed in a rope like twist holding up a simple tempered cup. The hallmarks are punched on the outside of the cup.

Historical information

This goblet was gifted to the Faculty by Professor John Norman (UK) during the Combined Scientific Meeting (CSM) organized by Hong Kong College of Anesthesiologists (HKCA) with ANZCA, held in May 2001, Hong Kong. The goblet is a unique design by the Australian - born artist Stuart Devlin AO, CMG. Devlin is considered to be a significant contemporary gold and silversmith, having become well known as a London Designer in the '70s and '80s. His achievements include the Royal Warrant of Appointment as Goldsmith and Jeweller to the Queen of England granted in 1982.

Inscriptions & Markings

[hallmarks] SD / lion passant / lion's head / S

Kimpton Brown flask

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Frosted, cylindrical glass flask with brown rubber stopper at top. A fluid outlet is located on the bottom of the flask and a narrow, horizontal and cylindrical valve is located below the flask rim. The flask contains a maximum volume of 600cc of fluid. The item was used in the collection and administration of blood transfusion procedures and the inside of the flask has a coating of paraffin wax to retard coagulation.

Historical information

The Kimpton Brown flask was first described in 1913; the first successful citrated blood transfusion occurred in November 1914.

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Leona Wilson wearing the Presidential medal without the Presidential gown. She is wearing the New Zealand Order of Merit medal on her left lapel. She has her hands clasped in front of her and is seated on an angle in a chair in front of a plain grey background. The painting is mounted in a thin black frame and sits in a box frame coloured brown and gold.

Historical information

Dr Leona Willson was the first female to be elected president of ANZCA (2008 - 2010) and the first New Zealander to hold the position. In 2011, Dr Wilson was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit in which she is proudly wearing this medal in the portrait. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Dr Leona Wilson which was unveiled at the ANZCA Council meeting June 2013. The artist, Jude Rae, is a Sydney based artist primarily known for her still life paintings, portraits and architectural interiors. Her artwork is held in major public and private collections in Australia, New Zealand, UK and USA.

Significance

Dr Leona Wilson was the first female ANZCA President and first President from New Zealand to hold the position.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a drawing of anaesthetic equipment, a flowmeter and an ether vaporiser. On the right is the ether vaporiser inside a glass cylinder, with a control tap on top of it. It is attached to a metal cylinder which houses the flowmeter which is measuring the Oxygen and Nitrous Oxide. There is a round Oxygen control and a Nitrous Oxide control attached underneath the metal cylinder, as well as an Oxygen Bypass and a Nitrous Oxide Bypass. The diagram has each part of the apparatus named with an arrow pointing to the parts.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is inserting a mouth-pack into the patient's mouth. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. A fourth person's hand is holding the patient's mouth open with a mouth gag dental instrument. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and the hands of the anaesthetist and the fourth person are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Inserting the Mouth-Pack. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photograph 3. / (Frame 16).

Blade, Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Macintosh semi curved blade designed in a baby size, with an unfitted light bulb attached. Minor scratches and some slight hit marks over the piece surface caused by its previous use. It has the manufacturer name and the place where it was made along with the owner’s name engraved at the back of the blade.

Historical information

"First described by professor R. R. Macintosh in the Lancet of February 13th, 1943, this design is now the acknowledged leader throughout the world." (PENLON, 1969) Reference: PENLON. 1969. Anaesthetic Equipment - Longworth Scientific Instrument Company LTD. Abingdon, Berkshire, England. January 1969.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the back of the blade near light bulb the owner details: R.C.H. / O.P.T. Stamped at the back blade base into metal the manufacturer's name and place: Longworth / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped on light bulb base serrated surface, HEINE XHL / #059 2,5v

Illustration

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

An illustration hand drawn in black ink on paper showing intubation of the larynx on a reclining head and neck, which is drawn as a cross section showing the inside of the head and the airways. The beak of the Chevalier Jackson's laryngoscope is inside the mouth and engaged with the epiglottis, which is lifted forwards so the glottis is exposed.

Probang

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This probang is constructed from metal and horsehair. The metal is coiled to enable flexibility and the proximal end has a metal finger grip for support. The distal end comprises a smooth metal tip and the strands of horsehair are designed to scoop strands of foreign material from the patient's pharynx.

Historical information

An instrument designed to remove swallowed foreign objects. The end containing horsehair is pushed past a foreign body in the oesophagus then expanded and withdrawn, bringing the foreign body with it.

Slide

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour slide mounted in white slide case. Image depicts modified Clover Inhaler with glass chamber, cloth rebreather bag and metal facemask against a green background.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in pencil: EMBLEY'S / 9448

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Folded paper packet containing suture needles wrapped in waxed paper. The packet is white with black printed text on front and back. A white sticker with red shield and black writing has been adhered to opening flap on the back of the packet.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in black ink on reverse: CURVED / CUTTING EDGE

Carving - Mauri Ora

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Traditional Māori carving in Rimu, a native New Zealand wood, with paua insets.

Historical information

Professor Alan Merry commissioned the work from New Zealand artist Heke Collier as a gift to the College at his retirement from Council. This artwork was carved by Heke Collier in May-July 2016. It is made from native New Zealand Rimu timber. Heke named this carving Mauri Ora which translates to vitality, well-being or the healing life-force. Tihei Mauri Ora (breath of life) is a well-known Māori saying that was uttered by the first human being. Māori believe that all people and all things have mauri. This carving symbolises the many shapes and forms of mauri with reference to the Māori creation story, and the spiritual and natural worlds. Māori refer to the heavens as Ranginui the sky-father and according to the Māori creation story, Ranginui was pressed against Papatūānuku the earth mother. Their children did not like living in the cramped, dark space between them. One of their sons Tāne separated Ranginui and Papatūānuku to allow light and life into the world. The central male figure carved into Mauri Ora (above) is Tāne. To his right (far right) is his mother Papatūānuku and to his left (far left) is his father Ranginui. Papatūānuku gives birth to all things including human kind and provides the physical and spiritual basis for life. The takarangi (spiral) design in the carving (to the left of Tāne) symbolises the life cycle. Whenua, the word for land also means placenta - organ that nourishes the baby in the womb. Women are associated with the land (whenua) because the land gives birth to people and so do women. In tribal history women have had influence over land and men. Papatūānuku is depicted in the carving to the right of Tāne. Ranginui played a pivotal role in the birth of the sun, moon, planets, stars and constellations – collectively called Te Whānau Mārama (the family of light). Human life and knowledge were said to originate in the realm of Ranginui. Tāne ascended the heavens to retrieve three baskets of knowledge: te kete-tuatea (basket of light), te kete-tuauri (basket of darkness) and te kete-aronui (basket of pursuit). Ranginui is depicted in the carving to the left of Tāne. Tāne had many different roles, and he was given different names to reflect these roles. He is called Tāne-mahuta as god of the forest, Tāne-te-wānanga as the bringer of knowledge, and Tāne-te-waiora as the bringer of life, prosperity, and welfare. His teachings and knowledge are relevant in contemporary times, and the cell-phone carved into his left hand represents this. Tuatara feature in the Māori creation story and some tribes view Tuatara as kaitiaki (guardians) of knowledge. Given that they have lived for more than 220million years. There are birds or manu surrounding Tāne in the carving, who represent Tane’s voice or the voice of the forest. The flax or harakeke depicted in the carving represent the family unit and reinforce the importance of kinship ties. There are plants, ferns, and birds carved into Mauri Ora play an integral role in the life-cycle which represent rongoa Māori or Māori medicine.

Book - Physical Description of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. Accompanied by a geological map, sections, and diagrams, and figures of the organic remains.

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tan coloured cloth book with an embossed circular motif on the centre of the front and back cover. The same embossed motif is repeated four times along the spine of the book. An embossed design of small, four petal flowers borders the edge of the front and back cover. The title of the book 'Strzelecki's New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land' is printed in gold on the spine. The cloth has come unstuck at various places around the spine and a small section is missing from the base of the spine. The cover is worn and has numerous dark stains possibly from mould. The book contains 19 engraved and lithographed plates. This includes a handcoloured octavo folding, geological map, bound as a frontispiece, depicting the NSW coast down to Gippsland and Tasmania, a fold out single colour geological cross section of the Newcastle Coal Basin, 14 plates illustrating shellfish and flora and three tinted lithographs. Single page maps at the back illustrate wind patterns around Australia.

Historical information

Dr. Gwen Wilson, Emeritus historian, gifted this book at ANZCA's first independent Annual Scientific Meeting held in Launceston in 1994. Dr Wilson presented this gift after her speech about the life of William Russ Pugh and his significant contribution to anaesthesia in Australia. It is unclear as to how the book came into Dr Wilson's possession. Published in London, 1845, for Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, this book was formally owned by general practitioner Dr William Russ Pugh, being the first medical practitioner in Australia to administer ether anaesthetic on 7 June 1847, in Launceston. The author of the book, P E De Strzelecki acknowledges Pugh for his assistance during his stay in Launceston and for allowing him the use of his laboratory for the analysis of the soils and minerals that were subsequently reported in this book (Page 131).

Inscriptions & Markings

[front title page, two black ink stamps that have bled through to the next page] W R.PUGH [front title page, black ink, cursive writing] H Grant \ 5 May 1910 [front title page, pencil, cursive writing, written around Pugh's stamp] Purchased from \ (unrecognizable script) [front title page, previous owner's name was rubbed out and consequently tore the page making the entry unreadable] [Inner back cover, bottom LHS, blue stamp] BOUND BY \ WESTLEYS & \ CLARK \ LONDON [Inner front cover, bottom LHS, black and purple ink] P65 \ 76 \ 78 \ 98 \ 163 \ 164 \ 217

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of anaesthetic apparatus inside a portable case which is standing upright and open. Inside the right half of the case is a flowmeter connected to several rubber tubes and a small Vinyl Ether vaporiser with a lever switched to OFF. The left half of the case has four shelves with equipment on each shelf. The top shelf has an oropharyngeal airway tube. The second shelf has two metal facemask inhalers. The third and fourth shelves hold metal cylindrical inhalers. The photograph shows the letters A - J with arrows, pointing to the different parts of the equipment.

Inhaler, Clover (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal based inhaler with glass dome lid. From the glass dome an elbow joint leads to a bulb for a rebreather bag [no bag]. There is a cork sealing an opening at the rear of the metal base and a blue sticker adhered.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in white on blue sticker: O.2.10 Manufacturer's logo moulded into metal insert

Mask, Wire

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wire framed face mask with a hinged outer layer which can be opened to insert gauze or flannel on which to administer ether. The domed portion is attached by inserting wire edges into slots in the rim, which ends in a handle with a loop at the end.

Wine Decanter

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Bulbous shaped pewter decanter with long ribbed neck and ring shaped pewter stopper.

Historical information

The decanter was gifted to members of the Board and Fellows of the Australasian Faculty by Dr. Abu Baker Suleiman on behalf of the Academy of Medicine of Malaysia. Dr. Suleiman, Master of the Academy, presented the decanter during the silver jubilee of the Academy which was established in 1966.

Inscriptions & Markings

PRESENTED TO / DEAN, FACULTY OF ANAESTHETISTS / Royal Australasian College of Surgeons / [crest of Academy] / ON THE OCCASION OF THE / SILVER JUBILEE / ACADEMY OF MEDICINE OF MALAYSIA / 1991 [hallmark] Selangor / Pewter

Laryngoscope, MacIntosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Complete Macintosh laryngoscope piece with a curved large sized attached blade with light bulb and a textured handle with serrated grip for easy of use and a screw in the blade connector. The handle is also a battery deposit to supply the led light bulb. The blade has general scratches on its surface because its use. At the back of the blade is still attached the curved lamina as holder of the base with the blade in its regular use position. Several engraved and stamped inscriptions are present all over the handle and blade (see inscriptions for details).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the base of the blade, BOC Stamped on the edge of the back side blade, STAINLESS Stamped on the back side blade base, MADE IN ENGLAND Engraved at the base of the blade attachment place, MAINLAND Engraved at the edge of the serrated grip of the handle, Alfred Anaes Stamped at the base of the handle, REGD TRADE MARK / P E N L O N / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped at the bottom of the handle base, REGD TRADE MARK / P E N L O N / MADE IN ENGLAND Engraved at the bottom of the handle base, AnaeA / ALFRED

Mask, Wire, Ether

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wire framed mask in tear shape. There is a hinged top bracket which allows for a piece of flannel or domette to secured to the mask, onto which the ether would be administered. There is an inlet tube near the hinged bracket to allow for the administration of CO2 or oxygen and the rim is pierced with holes.

Historical information

Mask used for administering ether anaesthesia. This mask also has a carbon dioxide inlet tube. Carbon dioxide was found to promote deeper breather which assisted in attaining faster anaesthesia. The mask was designed by an American anaesthetist James Tayloe Gwathmey, (1863-1944). Gwathmey invented a range of anesthesia equipment. In 1904, he introduced this mask as one part of a resuscitation apparatus. Gwathmey modified an existing mask to more closely fit the contours of the face. The holes in the rim allow for oxygen to be delivered for resuscitation or for the delivery of a combination of oxygen and anaesthetic.

Inhaler, Hewitt's (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Bowl shaped inhaler with a glass bowl base and metal dome top with a connector which appears to be for a rebreather bag. There is a metal switch at the base of the glass bowl to alter or regulate the flow.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into central tube: COXETER LONDON Stamped into side of metal dome: 6460

Pentothal Sodium

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Glass ampoule of Pentothal Sodium (Thiobarbiturate No. 8064) 1.0 gm with large yellowed white label.

Historical information

Experiments with intravenous anaesthesia were undertaken in 1872 using chloral hydrate. The high mortality rates discouraged further experimentation until the early 20th Century. Thionembutal, or Pentothal Sodium, was one of these early developments.

Significance

This ampoule has "Experimental" stamped on it. It has come directly from the manufacturing process. Pentothal Sodium is its trade name. It is now more commonly known as thiopentone.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black ink on label: Experimental / A 512738 / Abbott Laboratories / North Chicago. Ill., USA.

Laryngeal Mask Airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Yellow plastic tubing with a pink rubber laryngeal mask attached. There is an additional fine yellow tube threaded through the base of the rubber mask.

Historical information

The Laryngeal Mask Airway was invented in 1983 by British anaesthetist, Archie Brain.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black in along side: #4 LARYNGEAL MASK AUTOCLAVABLE INTAVENT 3:1

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of an Ormbsy inhaler lying on a wooden table. The inhaler has a metal mouthpiece with rubber tubing around the edge, and a rubber bag inside a black netbag.

Certificate, Proficiency, Anaesthesia

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Handwritten certificate from the University of Melbourne acknowledging the proficiency of Montefiore David Silberberg in the administration of anaesthesia. The certificate has been adhered to a piece of cardboard which was the backing board when it was previously framed.

Historical information

At the time of issue, anaesthesia was a practice still in its infancy. Proficiency in anaesthesia was determined by successful demonstration of a small number of administrations. It was also built into the existing medical qualifications and not a specialty in its own right. Dr Montefiore David Silberberg completed his training at the Melbourne and Children's Hospitals and went to London where he was clinical assistant to Sir James Mackenzie and was associated with Sir Thomas Lewis who did ground-breaking work on digitalis and electrocardiography. When he returned to Melbourne, he brought with him the first electrocardiograph used in medical practice in Australia. He started working in Collins Street and at the Melbourne Hospital as a specialist in heart problems. During World War I, he served in Egypt in 14 Australian General Hospital 1914-16. In 1919 he was appointed physician to outpatients at the Alfred Hospital while also working at the Children's Hospital and at Repatriation General Hospital. He was appointed inpatient physician at the Alfred Hospital in 1925 and, at about the same time, a University of Melbourne Stewart Lecturer in Medicine. He mentored many young cardiologists during his lifetime, providing instruction at the hospitals where he worked and holding regular extra-curricula meetings at his home.

Inscriptions & Markings

Contents of handwritten certificate: This is to certify that / Montefiore David Silberberg / during the year 1906 / attended [scribbled over] has personally / conducted six cases of / anaesthetic + / proficiency in administring anaesthetics / 22.12.06 Es Embley MD / Hon Anaesthetist / Melb Hosp Handwritten in pencil at bottom of certificate: 9 + 6 3/4 / 6 - 4 3/4 Handwritten in pencil on reverse: K. BROWN / Dr. Kaye / 9 + 6 3/4 / 6 - 4 3/4 / 1/4 [indecipherable] / Dr Kaye [underlined] / 124 Anderson St / South Yarra

Sudeck's Mask (or cone)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The metal cone shaped mask has moulded features on the proximal end to fit over the patient's mouth. The distal end is rounded and has an area for the absorbent material (in this item, a sponge) through which the anaestheric ether or chloroform was dripped. The side 'arms' would have been used to attach a strap.

Historical information

This item was designed by surgeon Paul Herman Martin Sudeck to administer ether and then chloroform anaesthesia.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a modified Lidwill anaesthetic machine sitting on carpet, taken from above. The vaporiser is metal and circular, and has metal valves and controls and two orange tubes. The machine has an electric cord and power plug which is coiled on the floor.

Historical information

The Lidwill machine was designed by Mark Lidwill in 1913, for the purpose of mechanical or insufflation anaesthesia. It was manufactured by Elliott Bros. of Sydney. Shortly afterwards, the Anaesthetic and Portable Machine Company of Sydney devised a machine that was functionally the same but also contained an electric lamp heater.

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Racing green cardboard box with cardboard slide tray holding three needles. There is allocation in the slide tray for twelve (12) needles. There is a white manufacturer's label on the front of the box.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped onto the flat of each needle: NON / STAIN / STEEL

Bottle, Glass

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small square based glass bottle with round neck, possibly used to hold ether. Found inside carry box with other unrelated objects including brown stopper which does not fit in bottle. Appropriate stopper for glass bottle is not present.

Historical information

The bottle was probably used for holding ether as part of a doctors medical kit. The bottle has visible side mould seams on the shoulder which discontinues or fades at the lip, a tooled finish and the glass has bubbles. There is no pontil-scar or mark on the base of the bottle, but there is a circular mould seam on the base.

Inscriptions & Markings

Small amount of brown residue inside bottle. Bubbles in side of glass. Brown marks on outer bottle. Scratches inside bottle neck. Glass stopper missing.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a drawing of the head of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record, Model J. The view is from the top looking down onto the machine, showing a round vaporiser with a valve attached to it and two round pressure gauges on either side. The recorder on the top of the photograph does not have a chart attached to it.

Historical information

The McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record was introduced in 1930, created by Dr Elmer I. McKesson.

Inscriptions & Markings

Each part of the machine has been labelled and handwritten in black ink the letters A - H and J - M on the surface.

Academic Bonnet

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Navy blue velvet cloth bonnet with stiffened brim covered in same fabric as bonnet. Around the hat is tied a gold cord with tassels.

Historical information

This academic bonnet belonged to Dr Mary Burnell. Mary Taylor Burnell was born on 21 February 1907, in Norwood, South Australia. She graduated with her MBBS in 1931. In 1932, Burnell served as a resident medical officer at Adelaide Children’s Hospital. By 1934 she was their Honorary Anaesthetist. It was also during this period that Burnell became the first female member of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. One year later, in 1935, she worked as Secretary for the South Australian Section of the Society. Although resigning from her position at the Children’s Hospital in 1937, Burnell returned in 1942. The outbreak of World War II meant hospital staff and resources were drained. During her work, Burnell lobbied for a Department of Anaesthetics in the Children’s Hospital. Through working at both hospitals, she became aware of the great differences between administering anaesthesia to children and administering it to adults. In 1953 she was elected President of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. She was the first female to be elected to this position. Two years later in 1955, Burnell was elected as a member of the Board of Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. In 1966 she was elected Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists. Again, she was the first female to be elected to this position. Burnell worked tirelessly to promote the importance of anaesthetics in Australia. Burnell’s contributions to anaesthetics were recognised with Honorary Fellowships to both the Australian Faculty of Anaesthetists and Royal College of Surgeons.

Label, Cylinder

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large unused rectangular label made for use on carbon dioxide cylinders with 10% CO2 printed on it. Beige with black lettering.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a Coutt's mask lying on a wooden table. The mask has a circular and made of metal and there is a small metal loop on the side of the object. Two thin metal hinges with screws are curved from one side of the mask to the other, and stuck on one hinge is a blue label with P.3.6 printed on it. Inside the mask is a metal mesh grill. A reddish brown residue like rubber and paper is stuck around the rim of the mask.

Resuscitator, Ambu

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown rubber bag with a round metal filter at one end and a connector tube at the other. There is a blue plastic connector between the rubber bag and the metal tube.

Historical information

In 1937, the engineer Holger Hesse founded Testa Laboratory, which later became Ambu. Hesse developed products that made a difference to patients and doctors. The real breakthrough came in 1956 when the Ambu ventilation bag reached the market, developed together with anaesthetist Henning Ruben. It was the world’s first self-inflating resuscitator and a major milestone in emergency medical equipment. The Ambu bag became a permanent part of hospital and emergency services product ranges.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into blue plastic connector: AMBU-INTERNATIONAL / Ruben-Resuscitator Stamped into filter: Ambu logo - large capital A with AUER inside the legs of the A

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who has received anaesthsia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is holding a dental suction hose and metal medical tray under the patient's mouth, who is leaning over the tray. An anaesthetist is holding an inhaler over the patient's nose. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Management of Vomiting. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse: Photo. 8. / (Frame 29).

Blade, Laryngoscope, Magill

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Magill type blade to fit Longworth handles adult size without light bulb. Attached hinge at the back of the blade. Visible hit marks mostly present at the back top of the blade and below. Worn contact stud on base and lateral side at the light bulb connection. Dust spots around the piece. It has stamped on the blade base the attachment type name.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped at the attachment base of the blade in cursive writing, Longworth

Book, Catalogue - Catalogue of Surgical Sundries, Theatre Equipment, Ward Furniture, Sterilizing Apparatus

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Red bound book with black printed text, and green and white internal pages

Historical information

Catalogue of surgical and anaesthetic equipment from the 1950s

Inscriptions & Markings

Typed in black and red ink onto fly page added to book: RETURN TO: / N. PALLATT, / ALLEN & HANBURYS (AFRICA) LTD. / 1956.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of an anaesthetic machine, likely to be a portable Foregger anaesthesia apparatus. Flowmeters with glass cylinders including Oxygen and Nitrous Oxide sit on a metal benchtop of a trolley with two drawers. A glass vaporiser is attached undernath the metal benchtop and there are metal valves attached on either side of the benchtop.

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Walter Thompson wearing the Presidential gown and medal. The sitter's hands are clasped in front of him and he is casually seated in front of a plain background coloured in black and red imitating a second frame/window. The painting is set in a plain gold and maroon frame.

Historical information

This portrait is of Dr Walter Thompson, former President of ANZCA from 2006 - 2008 was commissioned by ANZCA to commemorate Dr Thompson's presidential term. The painting was unveiled on 17 April 2009. The artist Ben Joel is a Western Australian artist, well known for his commissioned portraits and contemporary artworks in most media. Joel's artworks are represented in national private and public art collections

Inscriptions & Markings

[ lower right hand side] BEN JOEL '08

Plate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plated, medium size plate with central inscription. Displayed on a wooden stand and presented in a blue wooden box

Historical information

Presented to the ANZCA president David A Scott during the ANZCA ASM held in Brisbane, May 2017 by the College of Anaesthetists of Ireland.

Inscriptions & Markings

[Presented to the / Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists / on the occasion of their Silver Jubilee / from the / College of Anaesthetists of Ireland / May 2017]

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Blue cardboard box with lighter blue manufacturer's label and blue cardboard slide tray holding four (4) needles. The slide tray has allocation for twelve (12) needles.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in red ink on manufacturer's label: RECORD Stamped into flat of needle: SOL / 24

Magill's Endobroncheal Tube

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tightly wound wire spiral tube with metal 'T' nozzle at the opposite end.

Historical information

This endobronchial tube was invented by Sir Ivan Magill. It can be identified as pre 1948, as from that time on the wire spiral was eliminated from the body of the tubes. Sir Ivan Magill is famous for his involvement in modern anaesthesia. He worked closely alongside plastic surgeon Harold Gillies in the treatment of facial injuries sustained in World War 1. He was responsible for many items of anaesthetic equipment, but most particularly the single-tube technique of endotracheal anaesthesia.

Sight Feed Type Water Depression Flowmeter

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Historical information

This object dates back to 1925 and was sectioned by Dr Geoffrey Kaye in 1938. Flowmeters were attached to an anaesthetic machine to measure the flow rate of gas or liquid.

Inscriptions & Markings

Manufacturer's marks and instructions on the top screw valve state, K/38, Screw Lightly, Oxygen Fine. Direct Ox. is inscribed on the back of the top valve. G.Kaye fecit. 1938 is inscribed in handwriting on the top of the flowmeter tube.

Eyebath

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small glass container with a round base, extending into an oval shaped opening

Needles, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Twenty six (26) fine metal needles with twisted copper ends used for acupuncture.

Tube, Endotracheal, Kuhn

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal spiral tube with elaborate handle at one end and rounded at the other. There is a metal clasp at the base of the handle which all forms part of the endotracheal tube. Inside the tube is a curved metal piece that functions as an introducer.

Historical information

The evolution of endotracheal intubation for anaesthesia was a slow process. Franz Kuhn (1806-1929), a head and neck surgeon working in Kassel, Germany, between 1902 and 1911, is said to have done more than any other to obtain general recognition for endotracheal anaesthesia. Kuhn's tube, is a flexible metal one inserted on a stilette which was then withdrawn. The tube was then secured with an elastic neck strap and connected by a rubber tube to a Trendelenburg cone. The glottis was packed with oiled gauze.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record. The chart is for patient R.W's anaesthetic record, a 31 year old male for a right inguinal hernia operation on 2/5/1938. The anaesthetist listed is K. The chart lists the times and notes from the procedure, starting at 10.22am and ending at 11.27.