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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

Links

Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cream coloured metal tin with hinged side and manufacturer's information in red and black printed text on front of tin. Inside tin are twelve (12) needles on a metal tray which is wrapped and sealed with a plastic covering.

Ampoule, Camphor

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pale blue cardboard box with blue manufacturer's label across the face of the box and down each side. The label has black printed text. Inside the box is allocation for ten (10) ampoules. There are three (3) clear glass ampoules each with a pale blue label with black printed text. A metal blade is wrapped in tissue paper and a thin, squared off piece of metal is also wrapped in tissue paper.

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of former ANZCA President Dr. Richard Willis seated face on with hands crossed on his lap. He is wearing surgical scrubs with the College gown on a plain hanger behind him and the President's medal hanging off the back of the chair. Plain light blue background mounted in a plain brown frame.

Historical information

This is a portrait of Dr. Richard Willis, formally ANZCA President [2002-2004]. ANZCA commissioned the portrait which was unveiled to Dr. Willis on 23 February 2007.

Inscriptions & Markings

[Lower Left Hand Side] V SERELIS SEPT 2006

Vase, Glassware

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tear shaped, emerald green, hand-blown glass

Historical information

Dr Briscoe was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Pain Medicine in 2008 and gifted the vase at the end of her term in 2010. Dr Briscoe was the first woman to be appointed Dean of the Faculty. The artist Robert Wynne is an accomplished glass artist in Australia. His artworks are held in significant public and private collections nation wide and overseas. Public collections include the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Artbank and the Queensland Contemporary Art Gallery. Wynne's artworks are also part of the private collections of Bill Clinton, Sir Elton John and the Royal Family Collection of Japan.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched on base - DENIZEN

Sphygmograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The sphygmograph is housed in a purple-lined, leather bound case with a metal hinge and clasp located halfway up the case. It is constructed from chrome and comprises several moving parts incluing wires, knobs an handles. A black fabric strap with a metal attachment is also present, used to attach to the patient's wrist.

Historical information

They sphygmograph was devised as an improved device to measure blood pressure, and was a marked improvement on the first machine of its type. The sphygmomanometer was considered cumbersome and the Dudgeon sphygmograph was smaller, and once placed into its box, could be carried in a pocket. The Dudgeon sphygmograph was introduced in 1881. It was strapped tot he wrist with a metal strip that moved a stylus. This transmitted a record of the pulse onto smoked paper, creating a record of blood pressure.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of two unidentified male trainee anaesthetists in what looks like is the Australian Society of Anaesthetists headquarters at Mathoura Road Toorak. One man is seated with a book of diagrams in front of him and the other is standing next to him pointing at an image in the book.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Black paper label glued on bottom front of photograph, written in white ink in capitals and captioned: "He's wrong; and here's why". •Handwritten in black ink on reverse and underlined: Frame 17. •Handwritten in grey pencil on reverse: 20. [17 has been crossed out.]

Laryngoscope, Lynah

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Lynah's Ovoid Laryngeal Speculum with the light bulb and part of the connection wires still attached. Its semi square shape is characteristic of this kind of instrument, also has an screwable pointed end attachment. It has dusty and grey spots inside the canal of the blade near the light bulb canal. Solder spots are visible at the top of the blade as attachment of the laryngeal speculum blade base. General discolouration over the surface of this piece and hit marks present at the base of the handle. It was roughly engraved over the handle the owner’s details and year. Stamped at the base of the handle are the manufacturer’s details partially visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the handle, U N N A M E T . A D E L A I D E . c. 194[6] . Stamped at the base of the handle, [first line worn away might be MADE BY] / E / A D / [might be an S] YDN [might be an EY] / CHROME PLAT [incomplete word due stamp near the edge]

Laryngoscope, Flagg

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Complete laryngoscope used by Dr Lennard Travers. Medium sized Flagg straight blade with a slight curve at the distal end and a 'U' shape canal. The handle has a serrated grip for easy use and it is also a container for two batteries, it has a switch on its base. The full piece has visible and deep scratches over the top of blade around the stamped blade type inscription. The base of the blade has a worn surface with a slight discolouration due its use. No presence of led light bulb on blade. Minor scratches on handle base battery deposit with an ON - OFF switch black button.

Historical information

Designed by Dr Paluel Flagg around 1915 and later used for 25 years. This laryngoscope blade was designed to meet certain expectations about laryngeal richness and to avoid major tracheal injuries in patients. (Ball, 2014) Article reference: C. M. Ball & R. N. Westhorpe. 2014. Anaesthesia & Intensive Care. Nov 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p687-688. 2p.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on blade, FLAGG LARYNGOSCOPE Stamped on top handle blade base, AUBURN, [W/A seal], N.Y.U.S.A. Stamped on the handle base power source button, ON [red colour], OFF [blue colour]

Label, Cylinder

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large unused diamond shaped Austox label made for use on nitrous oxide cylinders. Dark purple, violet and white background, with white, violet and red lettering.

Inscriptions & Markings

Information printed on label: SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR MEDICAL USES. / AUSTOX [logo] / NITROUS OXIDE / KEEP COOL / WEIGHTS: / GROSS..........LBS. ........OZS. / TARE.......... LBS. ........OZS. / NET..........LBS. ........OZS. / Contents Imp. Gallons / WARNING. - Great caution must be exercised to prevent any oil entering the cylinder, or being applied to the valve or fittings. The use of oil may lead to a dangerous explosion. / AUSTRALIAN OXYGEN / AND / INDUSTRIAL GASES / PTY. LTD. / MELBOURNE

Model, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

White rubber human model, with acupuncture points annotated across the model. Stored in lidded in a brown cardboard box with a decorated envelope which presumably held acupuncture needles.

Inhaler, Clover (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal based inhaler with glass dome lid. From the glass dome an elbow joint leads to a bulb for a rebreather bag [no bag]. There is a cork sealing an opening at the rear of the metal base and a blue sticker adhered.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in white on blue sticker: O.2.10 Manufacturer's logo moulded into metal insert

Inhaler, Clover (sectioned)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cross section of Clover's inhaler attached to a circular metal base.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII. Dr Geoffrey Kaye sectioned equipment, enabling medical students to see the inner workings and gain insight into the engineering of the equipment.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten on white sticker at rear: P / 26 / B •White print on blue sticker: O.2.3. •Engraved on dome side of inhaler: G. Kaye sect. 1939.

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cream coloured metal tin with hinged side and manufacturer's information in red and black printed text on front of tin. Inside tin are twelve (12) needles on a metal tray which is wrapped and sealed with a plastic covering.

Pentothal Sodium

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Glass ampoule of Pentothal Sodium (Thiobarbiturate No. 8064) 1.0 gm with large yellowed white label.

Historical information

Experiments with intravenous anaesthesia were undertaken in 1872 using chloral hydrate. The high mortality rates discouraged further experimentation until the early 20th Century. Thionembutal, or Pentothal Sodium, was one of these early developments.

Significance

This ampoule has "Experimental" stamped on it. It has come directly from the manufacturing process. Pentothal Sodium is its trade name. It is now more commonly known as thiopentone.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black ink on label: Experimental / A 512738 / Abbott Laboratories / North Chicago. Ill., USA.

Hewitt's Gas-Air Stopcock and Mask

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Amber coloured ether inhaler, with leather mask, celluloid shield and inflatable cushion with attached Hewitt's stopcock.

Historical information

Sir Frederick William Hewitt was a great advocate of nitrous oxide anaesthesia, mainly for short procedures. In 1885, he reviewed the methods of administration and concluded that accurately fitting valves were essential at the commencement of the inhalation, in order to ensure the rapid washout of air from the lungs; and there was a distinct advantage in allowing some rebreathing of nitrous oxide towards the end of inhalation. He thus devised the stopcock. The stopcock consists of a cylinder with two rotating sleeves and two rubber flap valves. The arrangement allows air to be breathed either through the valves or rebreathed to and from the bag; nitrous oxide to be breathed either through the valves from the bag and out to the atmosphere or rebreathed to and from the bag. Soon after the introduction of this stopcock, there was an increased interest in administering oxygen in combination with nitrous oxide.

Cylinder, Nitrous Oxide

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Medium size empty blue coloured cylinder with rounded base and painted white neck once containing Nitrous Oxide. A large blue on white diamond shaped label is adhered onto the main cylinder body.

Historical information

Nitrous oxide has been used for anaesthesia in dentistry since December 1844, where Horace Wells made the first 12–15 dental operations with the gas in Hartford. Its debut as a generally accepted method, however, came in 1863, when Gardner Quincy Colton introduced it more broadly at all the Colton Dental Association clinics, that he founded in New Haven and New York City. Hospitals administer nitrous oxide as one of the anaesthetic drugs delivered by anaesthetic machines. Nitrous oxide is a weak general anaesthetic, and so is generally not used alone in general anaesthesia. In general anaesthesia it is used as a carrier gas with oxygen for more powerful general anaesthetic drugs.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on manufacturer's label: 'CIG [logo] / [blank weights table] / DRY / NITROUS OXIDE / C.I.G. (Victoria) PTY. LTD. / 50 LA TROBE STREET, MELBOURNE C3 / Telephones: FJ 6681 / FJ 4164 / USE NO OIL / OR GREASE'

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a Bruck inhaler lying on its side on a wooden table. The metal inhaler is oval shaped with one half made of glass, and also has a vertical crosspiece. Lying next to the inhaler is a face mask and a filler for measuring ether.

Historical information

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Lambert Bruck.

Medical Carry Box

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black cardboard box with handle and simple border decoration on top. Brass hinges at the rear and two brass hook clasps at the front. Interior is lined with black linen. Cardboard divider inside and square compartment in corner would have been used to hold a bottle of ether in place.

Historical information

A characteristic black, round topped box, to carry medical equipment with a divider which would have held a square, plain glass bottle. The donor, Dr. Holloway is known to have acquired much of Dr. Howard Jones' equipment. In 1930 Dr Howard Jones, M.B., B.S., (Lond.). Surgeon Anaesthetist to Charing Cross Hospital first described percaine in an article in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. According to Norman, J. in the British Journal of Anaesthesia, Jones was the first honorary secretary of the Association of Great Britain and Ireland, 'of spinal anaesthesia fame', and a leading practitioner in his day. He apparently committed suicide in 1935, there are references that he 'could not make a living from anaesthesia'. (Norman, 2002, 'An informal history of the first 25 years', The British Journal of Anaesthesia, 88 (3): 445-450) The maker of this medical box, Allen and Hanburys Ltd., was a British pharmaceutical manufacturer, founded in 1715, absorbed by Glaxo Laboratories in 1958.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in gold leaf inside lid: ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD / LONDON.W. / 48.WIGMORE ST

Bowl

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pewter bowl on raised round base with gold plated decorated inlay in an ornate flowery scroll pattern. The gift details are engraved on the one side of the bowl.

Historical information

The bowl was presented to ANZCA by Dr K Inbasegaran on behalf of the Malaysian Society of Anesthesiologists, Academy of Medicine of Malaysia, at the 2003 Hobart Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM). Dr. Richard Willis was President of the ANZCA at the time and formally accepted the gift during the ASM.

Inscriptions & Markings

[front] WITH COMPLIMENTS / TO ANZCA / FROM MAL. SOC. ANAES. / MAY 2003 [base, maker's mark] ROYAL / SELANGOR / PEWTER

Boyle's Machine

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Green trolley on casters with flowmeter and vaporiser bottles attached to a stainless cross bar. There is a glass shelf at top of the trolley and a second glass shelf at base of trolley, above a pull out drawer. The pull out drawer contains 4 x black rubber masks, 3 x black rubber tubing connectors, 4 x seals, 1 a black corrugated rubber hose with red rebreather bag, red tube and masonite support board.

Historical information

This Boyle’s machine was made by the British Oxygen Company (BOC) in the 1950’s. The original Boyle's machine was invented by the British anaesthetist, Henry Boyle in 1917. His machine was a modification of the American Gwathmey apparatus of 1912, and became the best known early continuous flow anaesthetic machine. The Boyle’s machine was first made by Coxeter and Sons, under the direction of Lord George Wellesly, which was later acquired by the British Oxygen Company (BOC). Though a lot of changes have been made to the original design of the Boyle’s machine, the basic structure remains the same today.

Inscriptions & Markings

Tin plate attached to upper portion of trolley: THE / BOYLE / apparatus / BY THE BRITISH OXYGEN CO. LTD.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Macintosh semi curved blade designed in a baby size, with an unfitted light bulb attached. Minor scratches and some slight hit marks over the piece surface caused by its previous use. It has the manufacturer name and the place where it was made along with the owner’s name engraved at the back of the blade.

Historical information

"First described by professor R. R. Macintosh in the Lancet of February 13th, 1943, this design is now the acknowledged leader throughout the world." (PENLON, 1969) Reference: PENLON. 1969. Anaesthetic Equipment - Longworth Scientific Instrument Company LTD. Abingdon, Berkshire, England. January 1969.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the back of the blade near light bulb the owner details: R.C.H. / O.P.T. Stamped at the back blade base into metal the manufacturer's name and place: Longworth / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped on light bulb base serrated surface, HEINE XHL / #059 2,5v

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of Associate Professor Richard Walsh sitting to the side facing left on a blue chair, wearing the College gown and President's medal against a plain background. Mounted in a mottled brown coloured frame.

Historical information

This is a portrait of former ANZCA President, Associate Professor Richard Walsh. In 1996, he was elected Vice President and, in 1998 was elected President, serving a full two year term. This painting was formally presented to the College in 2006. Further information about Associate Professor Richard Walsh can be obtained on the Lives of the Fellows, http://anzca.online-exhibition.net/fellows/fellows-1992/richard-george-walsh/ The artist, Jiawei Shen is a Chinese Australian artist considered to be one of Australia's leading portrait artists. He is most famous for his 2006 winning entry of the prestigious Sir John Sulman Prize in which he painted a portrait of Pope Francis which was presented to His Holiness in 2014.

Inscriptions & Markings

Lower left hand corner [artist signature \ '05]

Medal, Orton

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Die cast medal mounted in a hard blue velour base, with a wooden gold frame. The medal is placed inside the base, with a red velvet ribbon coming out from underneath, used for removing the medal. Underneath the medal is a two cent coin, stuck to the base. Where the medal rests is covered in red velvet as well.

Historical information

The Robert Orton Medal is awarded at the discretion of the Council of the College (formerly the Board of the Faculty), the sole criterion being distinguished service to anaesthesia. The award was established by the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, in 1967. Robin William Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness. Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. The Orton Medal was awarded posthumously.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded in relief around perimeter of medal: THE ROBERT ORTON AWARD R.A.C.S. •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: THE ROBERT ORTON MEDAL OF THE FACULTY / OF ANAESTHETISTS, ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE / OF SURGEONS, PRESENTED POSTHUMOUSLY TO / ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD AT THE R.A.C.S. / G.S.M. MAY 7 1989 •Stamped in black ink on reverse: PORT MELBOURNE PRINTS & FRAMING / 276 BAY ST., PORT MELBOURNE 3207 / TELEPHONE No 646 4000 •Etched around the rim of the medal: ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD OCTOBER 1987

Magill's laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This U-shaped chrome plated laryngoscope comprises an endotracheal tube used to facilitate access to the patient's airway, wire spring attachments and a cylindrical handle with provisions for battery to illuminate inside the body during use.

Historical information

This object is Magill's adaptation of the battery handle in the form of an "inserting tracheoscope". Introduced in 1935 for one-lung anaesthesia, it is combined with an endotracheal tube, the central part of which is a latex-covered wire spiral, and a bronchus blocker. In use, the tube was fixed to the holder and the whole apparatus inserted as a ttracheoscope. At the carina, the blocker was inserted into the bronchus and the balloon (now perished in this example) inflated. The holder was then removed leaving the endotracheal tube and blocker in place. The bronchus blocker consists of gum elastic on woven silver wire and has a suction channel opening at the tip. in other stages of development of Magill's laryngoscope, the original pattern blade was adapted to the battery handle, at first in a fixed arrangement and then with interchangeable blades of different sizes. Later still, the folding handle was introduced.

Inscriptions & Markings

Embossed on the central shaft of the item is 'A Charles King, Ltd', the maker's details.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a demonstration of a dental procedure on a patient who is receiving anaesthesia. Dr Geoffrey Kaye, wearing a white gown, is inserting a mouth gag dental instrument into the patient's mouth. The anaesthetist's hands are supporting the patient's head and administering anaesthesia to the patient through an inhaler. The background of the photo has been covered with black ink so that only Dr Kaye, the patient, and hands of the anaesthetist are visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

•Printed text in black ink on paper label glued under photo: Inserting the Gag under Vision. •Handwritten with blue ink on reverse and underlined: Photo. 2.

Fluothane (Halothane)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Amber glass bottle with white rounded manufacturer's label and green printed text, with white metal screw top lid. The bottle is housed in its original cardboard packaging. Bottle has been decanted.

Murray's Chloroform Mask

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Triangular shaped mask with hinged arm at point of triangle that connects to upper frame section via a hook. Used for the administration of chloroform.

Historical information

This small, neat, domette covered mask was widely used throughout Australia for the administration of chloroform anaesthesia.

Nitrous oxide gasometer

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main component of the nitrous oxide gasometer is a metal urn-shaped chamber form which an outlet valve and circular moulded tap allows for the flow of gas. A frame sits atop the chamber and comprises ornately-decorated metal flourishes and three anchoring pipes, two attached to each side of the chamber and one attached to the centre of the lid. The gasometer sits atop an ornately decorated cast iron stand with a circular base.

Cannula, Tracheostomy

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver tube in two pieces, which form an innner and outer tube. The inner tube is curved with a flat plate at the top and two squared hooks (handles) coming off the plate. The outer tube has been spliced, creating two separate curved sides with an oval, bowl-like plate at the end, with an oval shaped holed punched through either side. Attached to the square hook of the inner tube is a green cotton ribbon.

Historical information

This was gifted to Robin William Smallwood on his retirement. Smallwood graduated from medicine in the mid-1950s and decided to make a career in anaesthetics, was granted Fellowship in 1965, became a member of the Board of the Faculty in 1976 and became Dean in 1986-1987. It has been made by Arnold & Sons of London who were medical instrument manufacturers and became Mayer & Meltzer.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into the bowl shaped plate: ARNOLD & SONS / SILVER

Plate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plated, medium size plate with central inscription. Displayed on a wooden stand and presented in a blue wooden box

Historical information

Presented to the ANZCA president David A Scott during the ANZCA ASM held in Brisbane, May 2017 by the College of Anaesthetists of Ireland.

Inscriptions & Markings

[Presented to the / Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists / on the occasion of their Silver Jubilee / from the / College of Anaesthetists of Ireland / May 2017]