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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

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Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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Bottle, Blood transfusion

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Round, clear glass bottle with white [discoloured] paper label, with red printed, and metal screw-top lid.

Historical information

Dr Alan Holmes á Court enlisted in the Australian Army in 1916 as a medical officer with the rank of Captain. In 1918, Holmes á Court was promoted to Major and attached to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance on the Western Front. As the front advanced, the Casualty Clearing Stations became further removed from the battlefield, creating an urgent need for immediate resuscitation prior to transfer back to the CCS. In June 1918, Holmes a Court and his colleagues established a forward resuscitation team. The team consisted of one doctor trained in surgery, blood transfusion and resuscitation, another doctor trained in anaesthesia, resuscitation and blood classification, and four other assisting staff. This team moved out to the wounded, rather than waiting for them to be stretchered back. They provided on-the-spot, life-saving resuscitation. The wounded were then transported back to the Casualty Clearing Station or Regimental Aid Post for further treatment. Among the assorted surgical and resuscitation equipment carried by the forward resuscitation team, were a number of Kimpton-Brown flasks. Blood was collected from patients with minor injuries using the flask. It was then administered to those in need, after establishing their blood type. Citrated blood was introduced by the Americans in 1917. This allowed blood administration to be delayed for up to two hours but there were many problems with transport, storage and infection in these early experimental days.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten on white [discoloured] paper label: Phillip HARRIS Moulded into the top of the screw-top lid in red ink: RED CROSS BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Bottle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small clear glass bottle with white metal screw top lid and white label with handwritten text. There is a small amount of yellow/brown liquid in the bottle

Historical information

Geoffrey Kaye gave this jar of Essence of Limes to Dr John Paull in 1982 after describing the preparation of a drink he called "White Lightning" or "White Mule". The drink comprised absolute alcohol and a dash of the essence of limes and is mentioned in Marginson's account of the art treasures of Melbourne University as being shared with Geoffrey by him and Professor R. D. Wright when they were negotiating about the creation of a piece of sculpture for the University grounds.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on white label adhered to bottle: ESSENCE OF LIMES / G. TRUMPER, / 9 CURZON ST, / LONDON, W.1

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of Associate Professor Neville J Davis, seated at an angle, wearing the Presidential gown and badge. The backdrop is plain with a mock outline of a window. Mounted in a plain gold frame with a brass plaque affixed to center of frame

Historical information

Associate Professor Neville J Davis, was appointed President of ANZCA in 1995 until 1996. Professor Davis was a member of both the last Board of the Faculty and the first Council of the newly formed Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Further information about Professor Davis can be found on Lives of the Fellows,http://anzca.online-exhibition.net/fellows/fellows-1992/neville-james-davis/ The artist Ben Joel is a Western Australian artist, well known for his commissioned portraits and contemporary pieces in most media. Joel's artworks are represented in private and public art collections.

Inscriptions & Markings

[plaque] ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR / NEVILLE J DAVIS / PRESIDENT 1995-1996

Book - Physical Description of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. Accompanied by a geological map, sections, and diagrams, and figures of the organic remains.

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tan coloured cloth book with an embossed circular motif on the centre of the front and back cover. The same embossed motif is repeated four times along the spine of the book. An embossed design of small, four petal flowers borders the edge of the front and back cover. The title of the book 'Strzelecki's New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land' is printed in gold on the spine. The cloth has come unstuck at various places around the spine and a small section is missing from the base of the spine. The cover is worn and has numerous dark stains possibly from mould. The book contains 19 engraved and lithographed plates. This includes a handcoloured octavo folding, geological map, bound as a frontispiece, depicting the NSW coast down to Gippsland and Tasmania, a fold out single colour geological cross section of the Newcastle Coal Basin, 14 plates illustrating shellfish and flora and three tinted lithographs. Single page maps at the back illustrate wind patterns around Australia.

Historical information

Dr. Gwen Wilson, Emeritus historian, gifted this book at ANZCA's first independent Annual Scientific Meeting held in Launceston in 1994. Dr Wilson presented this gift after her speech about the life of William Russ Pugh and his significant contribution to anaesthesia in Australia. It is unclear as to how the book came into Dr Wilson's possession. Published in London, 1845, for Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, this book was formally owned by general practitioner Dr William Russ Pugh, being the first medical practitioner in Australia to administer ether anaesthetic on 7 June 1847, in Launceston. The author of the book, P E De Strzelecki acknowledges Pugh for his assistance during his stay in Launceston and for allowing him the use of his laboratory for the analysis of the soils and minerals that were subsequently reported in this book (Page 131).

Inscriptions & Markings

[front title page, two black ink stamps that have bled through to the next page] W R.PUGH [front title page, black ink, cursive writing] H Grant \ 5 May 1910 [front title page, pencil, cursive writing, written around Pugh's stamp] Purchased from \ (unrecognizable script) [front title page, previous owner's name was rubbed out and consequently tore the page making the entry unreadable] [Inner back cover, bottom LHS, blue stamp] BOUND BY \ WESTLEYS & \ CLARK \ LONDON [Inner front cover, bottom LHS, black and purple ink] P65 \ 76 \ 78 \ 98 \ 163 \ 164 \ 217

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a drawing of the head of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record, Model J. The view is from the top looking down onto the machine, showing a round vaporiser with a valve attached to it and two round pressure gauges on either side. There are blood pressure tubes attached to the sides of the machine. The recorder on the top of the photograph has a chart attached to it with written details.

Historical information

The McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record was introduced in 1930, created by Dr Elmer I. McKesson.

Inscriptions & Markings

Each part of the machine has been labelled and handwritten in black ink the letters A - H and J - P on the surface.

Promethazine hydrochloride (Phenergan)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Amber coloured glass ampoule with yellow band on neck and teal coloured print on glass containing 50mg in 2ml of Hermethazine [promethazine hydrochloride].

Historical information

Promethazine hydrochloride is an anti-histamine with strong sedative effects. It is used as a sedative and to combat hay fever, allergic reactions, nausea and vomiting.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on glass in teal: CAUTION S4 / HERMETHAZINE / PROMETHAZINE / HYDROCHLORIDE / 50mg in 2ml / DAVID BULL / EXP APR 81

Vase, Glassware

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two tear shaped clear vases, one with opaque yellow colouring on the outer edge and base, one with opaque green colouring on the outer edge and base.

Inscriptions & Markings

etched underneath the base - EDDIE

Ampoule, Propanidid

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Set of three clear glass ampoules with product details printed in red ink. There is a clear liquid retained inside each of the ampoules.

Historical information

Introduced by Bayer in 1963, Propanidid is an ultra short-acting general anaesthetic. It was withdrawn because of anaphylactic reactions.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in red ink: Eponotol / 0,5g Propanidid / in 10ml inj. sol.

Book, Catalogue - A Catalogue of Respirators and Allied Equipment

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pale blue [discoloured] cardboard covered book with blue pages printed in black ink, bound by a staple through the spine.

Historical information

Undated catalogue outlining a range of respirators available through Garthur (London) Ltd.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on front cover: P. Penn

Portrait, Photographic

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Framed colour photographic portrait of Dr Genevieve Goulding holding the President's medal.

Historical information

This photographic portrait was commissioned to commemorate Dr Genevieve Goulding's term as President of ANZCA. Traditionally, ANZCA presidents have been commemorated at the end of their term with a commissioned oil painting. In 2015, the decision was made by ANZCA Council to change to photographic portraiture. This meant the existing oil paintings of College presidents became a formed collection which will not be added to and this portrait is the first to be commissioned in the new medium. It was unveiled at the ANZCA Council dinner on 22 July 2016.

Waring's cone

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Cylindrical metal face mask with a high neck that is open at both ends. The larger opening was placed over the patient's mouth while the smaller opening, comprising a sponge to absorb the anaesthetic and a hinged perforated lid, was used to administer the anaesthetic.

Historical information

The object was donated by Ramsay Surgical Limited in 1944.

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Rectangular red cardboard box with red cardboard sliding insert containing four (4) needles which appear to be of two separate types. White [discoloured] manufacturer's label adhered to front of box with red printed text and manufacturer's logo.

Inscriptions & Markings

Typed in black ink on yellow sticker stuck to side of box: 20 x 3in Handwritten in brown ink on manufacturer's label: [indecipherable] / doz / 20SWGx3"

Stopcock, Hewitt

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown leather facemask attached to metal inhaler and stopcock device that has been sectioned to reveal its inner workings. The various exposed channels have been painted either green, red, blue or purple.

Historical information

When Hewitt introduced his regulating stopcock in 1887, attempts were made to dilute the nitrous oxide with air and so obviate the element of asphyxiation. The method was to be seen in London, mainly in dentistry and minor surgery, so late as 1930. It was not very successful. To give even 10% of oxygen (which is not enough) the gas-mixture must contain 55% of air and 45% of nitrous oxide. The latter is thus so diluted by atmospheric nitrogen as to be incapable of producing anaesthesia except by asphyxiation. "Gas-air" was confined to analgesia, for example in midwifery. (Source: Penn catalogue)

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved into side of stopcock: HEWITT'S / N20-02 / 1895 / G. Kaye sect. 1952. •Stamped into other side of stopcock: [indecipherable] BARTH & CO. / SOLE MAKERS / 54. POLAND STREET LONDON.W.

Ormsby's Inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler consists of an india-rubber flexible bag enclosed within a net bag to limit expansion. There is a soft metallic mouthpiece with india-rubber tubing around the edge. The tubing had to be purchased separately from the manufacturer. The body contains a wire cage with a similarly shaped hollow sponge into which ether was poured.

Historical information

Lambert Ormsby was a New Zealand surgeon who migrated to Ireland. He described his inhaler in a letter to the Lancet in 1877.Ormsby listed the advantages of his inhaler as simple, inexpensive, small quantity required to produce sleep, prevents evaporation of ether, portable and small (can be carried in pocket), short time to complete anaesthesia (two minutes) and safe. Disadvantages of this apparatus were that it had to be removed in order to recharge the sponge with ether or when anaesthesia becomes too deep. Considerable carbon dioxide accumulation developed and there would also be some oxygen lack. In thirty years of use, Ormsby's Inhaler underwent certain modifications, an exhalation valve was fitted to the mask and device for recharging the sponge with ether was later added. The Ormsby inhaler was modified by Carter Braine in 1898 with the aim of making it easier to clean. Essentially it is very similar except there is no net around the bag.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maker's details inscribed into metal ring around the bore: Barth Co. London.

Cannula, Transfusion

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

A selection of metal cannula of various designs and sizes.

Historical information

Doctors trained in blood transfusion were essential to the development of Forward Resuscitation Teams during World War I. In 1918, Dr Alan Holmes a Court and his colleagues established a resuscitation team and, following their remarkable success at the battle of Hamel on July 4, teams were permanently established at each of the five Australian divisions. Each team consisted of one doctor trained in surgery, blood transfusion and resuscitation, another doctor trained in anaesthesia, resuscitation and blood donor classification, and four other assisting staff. This team moved out to the wounded, rather than waiting for them to be stretchered back. They provided on-the-spot, life-saving resuscitation. The wounded were then transported back to the Casualty Clearing Station or Regimental Aid Post for further treatment.

Electroplated Silver Basket

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Antique Sheffield electroplated silver, copper basket with swing handle. The bowl of the basket is octagonal with incised geometric and circular pattern along the perimeter. Engraved in the bowl of the basket is an image of a phoenix including a smaller image of a phoenix engraved on the swing handle. The silver has worn in some places in particular around the image of the phoenix in the bowl of the basket.

Historical information

This object was donated by Dr Susan Kelly in memory of Dr Loraine Hibbard (1916-2002) Emeritus Consultant, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW. The maker and date of this object is unverified due to lack of supporting evidence. It is unknown as to the significance of the engraved Phoenix.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Macintosh semi curved blade designed in a child size, with a light bulb attached to the blade and a hinge attached to the back side of the base. Several scratches and deep hit marks over its surface caused by its previous use. This piece also has visible old dust spots and stains. Its contact stud is in a well condition and does not has any inscriptions.

Historical information

"First described by professor R. R. Macintosh in the Lancet of February 13th, 1943, this design is now the acknowledged leader throughout the world." (PENLON, 1969) Reference: PENLON. 1969. Anaesthetic Equipment - Longworth Scientific Instrument Company LTD. Abingdon, Berkshire, England. January 1969.

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown cardboard box with sliding insert containing hypodermic needles. On the front of the box is a buff coloured manufacturer's label with rust coloured print. On the rear of the box is a white coloured manufacturer's label with rust coloured print. The box has a thin strip of rust coloured plastic all the way around it. The insert has allocation for six needles but there are only four present.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in black ink on front of box: EXPLORING / 19 B.W.G. 3 INCH •Stamped into metal at flat of connector: ARNOLD / SS

Academic Bonnet

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Navy blue velvet cloth bonnet with stiffened brim covered in same fabric as bonnet. Around the hat is tied a gold cord with tassels.

Historical information

This academic bonnet belonged to Dr Mary Burnell. Mary Taylor Burnell was born on 21 February 1907, in Norwood, South Australia. She graduated with her MBBS in 1931. In 1932, Burnell served as a resident medical officer at Adelaide Children’s Hospital. By 1934 she was their Honorary Anaesthetist. It was also during this period that Burnell became the first female member of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. One year later, in 1935, she worked as Secretary for the South Australian Section of the Society. Although resigning from her position at the Children’s Hospital in 1937, Burnell returned in 1942. The outbreak of World War II meant hospital staff and resources were drained. During her work, Burnell lobbied for a Department of Anaesthetics in the Children’s Hospital. Through working at both hospitals, she became aware of the great differences between administering anaesthesia to children and administering it to adults. In 1953 she was elected President of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. She was the first female to be elected to this position. Two years later in 1955, Burnell was elected as a member of the Board of Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. In 1966 she was elected Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists. Again, she was the first female to be elected to this position. Burnell worked tirelessly to promote the importance of anaesthetics in Australia. Burnell’s contributions to anaesthetics were recognised with Honorary Fellowships to both the Australian Faculty of Anaesthetists and Royal College of Surgeons.

Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Right hand stainless steel size 3 Macintosh interchangeable laryngoscope blade with light bulb, attached to a standard sized handle with serrated grip and no batteries inside deposit. Minor scratches and hit marks are over its surface. A blue sticky tape is attached to the back side of the blade where the size and type is, also can be found the mark left by a previous sticky tape around the top neck of the handle. The blade was made by Penlon in England.

Historical information

"First described by Professor R. R. Macintosh in the Lancet of February 13th, 1943, this design is now the acknowledged leader throughout the world." (PENLON, 1969) Reference: PENLON. 1969. Anaesthetic Equipment - Longworth Scientific Instrument Company LTD. Abingdon, Berkshire, England. January 1969.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved in cursive writing above the light bulb, Royal Childrens Hospital Engraved in capital writing above the light bulb next to previous text, D.A. Stamped at the back side of the blade, MACINTOSH / 3 Stamped at the blade base lateral side, REGD. TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped at the blade back side, STAINLESS

Inhaler, Hewitt

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tall black round topped box with brass hooks at the sides and brass hinges at rear. There is a brown fabric handle on the top. The box has red padding inside the lid and red lining inside the base and sides. There is a round section in the base of the box for holding the round clear glass bottle for ether. There is also a ellipse-shaped metal inhaler on small metal base with a thin metal handle and pipe with bakelite plug attached via a small metal chain. A brown mask is made of brown leather and celluloid which is connected to the inhaler. There is a metal ether measure for pouring the ether.

Historical information

Sir Frederic W. Hewitt (1857-1916), an accomplished and well respected English anesthesiologist, was an expert in the function and use of the Clover Ether Inhaler. In 1901, Hewitt described his modification of the Clover Inhaler. Often referred to as the Hewitt Wide-Bore Inhaler, Dr. Hewitt introduced changes in order to make it easier to breathe through the device and improve the ventilation of oxygen and carbon dioxide. In 1901, Hewitt was recruited to anesthetize King Edward VII for emergency abdominal surgery. This was just a day or so before the new King was to be coronated. He recovered well, and Hewitt became the first anesthesiologist ever to be knighted. (Source: Wood Library Museum)

Inscriptions & Markings

On notecard in box: (B) HEWITT'S INHALER 1895, MADE BY GEO. BARTH & CO LTD., ADVERTISED AS THE SOLE MAKERS OF THE INHALER AND RECOGNISED BY HEWITT IN HIS TEXT BOOK - ANAESTHETICS AND THEIR ADMINISTRATION - AS THE MAKER OF HIS INHALER. / GIVEN BY DR. E.S. HOLLOWAY IN 1951, WHO ACQUIRED MUCH OF HOWARD JONES' EQUIPMENT AFTER THE LATTER'S DEATH. Stamped on underside of glass bottle in a circle: WUBW [illegible] Blue sticker on inhaler: O.2.13. Printed on inhaler under handle: Geo Barth [illegible] / SOL [illegible] Printed on body of inhaler: Full Printed on body of inhaler: 1/2 Printed on inside of leather mask: F35

Pugh's inhaler - replica

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main container comprises an inverted funnel shaped glass jar that is connected to the top glass globe via an etched glass valve. Sea sponges are located within the glass vessel and the woven cloth tube is connected to the base of the glass container.

Historical information

Replica of original glass ether inhaler used by Dr William Russ Pugh in Launceston in 1847.

Significance

William Russ Pugh is credited with being the first person in Australia to administer ether as anaesthesia. Pugh created his own ether inhaler based on a report in the London Illustrated News, dated January 1847. The paper reached Pugh in May and by June he had already designed, made and used the ether inhaler. On 7 June 1847 he performed two surgeries using anaesthesia. He also had a journalist present to record the event.

Untitled

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Draeger resuscitation kit, inside wooden case with handle. Case contains small heavy gas cylinder with large beige handwritten 'S. M E' inscription on one side. Due to water damage case missing pieces of plywood in corner and floor of case bubbled and swollen.|Rubber decomposed rigid

Historical information

The Dräeger Pulmotor was developed in 1907. It addressed previous concerns about lung injury, by limiting both the inspiratory and expiratory pressures. Although still controversial, the Pulmotor was widely distributed and commercially successful. Oxygen from cylinders provided both the inspiratory gas flow and the driving mechanism. Expiration was an active process and gases were sucked from the lungs by negative pressure created by a Venturi effect. This device came with a facemask and harness, with a caution that the operator should take care to prevent air entering the stomach.

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of a McKesson Nargraf anaesthetic record. The chart is for patient R.W's anaesthetic record, a 31 year old male for a right inguinal hernia operation on 2/5/1938. The anaesthetist listed is K. The chart lists the times and notes from the procedure, starting at 10.22am and ending at 11.27.

Tube, Endotracheal, Double Lumen

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Clear plastic tube with a "v" shaped connector at one end that holds two tubes, one blue one and one clear plastic. There are two finer plastic tubes on either side of the central tube, one blue one and one clear plastic. Blue plastic cuff and a clear plastic cuff are wrapped around the tube at the other end.

Historical information

This is an unused example of a Double Lumen Endotracheal Tube. This tube would be used to achieve the selective one sided ventilation of either the right or the left lung.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black ink on the side of the central tube: Mallinckrodt R 35Fr. LEFT Brocho-Cath TM 27 Do Not Reuse 29 31cm Printed in black ink on blue plastic tube: BRONCHIAL Printed in black ink on clear plastic tube: 35Fr. TRACHEAL

Sight Feed Type Water Depression Flowmeter

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Historical information

This object dates back to 1925 and was sectioned by Dr Geoffrey Kaye in 1938. Flowmeters were attached to an anaesthetic machine to measure the flow rate of gas or liquid.

Inscriptions & Markings

Manufacturer's marks and instructions on the top screw valve state, K/38, Screw Lightly, Oxygen Fine. Direct Ox. is inscribed on the back of the top valve. G.Kaye fecit. 1938 is inscribed in handwriting on the top of the flowmeter tube.

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown and white cardboard box with white manufacturer's label adhered to the front. The box contains clear plastic tubes, holding two (2) metal needles in each tube. There is allocation for six (6) needles in the tubing, but only four (4) needles are present. There is allocation for another tubing section, but that is not present.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into flat portion of connector: YALE / RUSTLESS / B-D / 25

Book, Catalogue - Surgical Instruments and Appliances. Operation Tables, Sterilizers and Hospital Equipment. Sterilized Surgical Dressings, Sutures and Ligatures.

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black bound book with gold leaf text on front cover and spine and white internal pages with blue printed text and illustrations

Historical information

Surgical and anaesthetic equipment catalogue from 1938

Inscriptions & Markings

Book plate adhered to inside cover: SCIENTIA SAULTEM FERAMUS / SIR ANTHONY JEPHCOTT, BT. Handwritten in blue ink: J. Jephcott / NOV 1977

Analgesic, Aspirin

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Clear glass tube with with clear plastic lid. There is a brown and green manufacturer's label stuck to the tube.

Historical information

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication.

Cannulae, Transfusion

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two glass tubes, one with straight and one with a curve at the base. The tubes, known as cannualae, were used to facilitate blood transfusions.

Historical information

Blood was long thought to be the essence of life and the centre of the soul; it was believed to provide a person with physical strength and mental abilities. In 1677, Richard Lower and Jean Baptiste Denis, in separate experiments, attempted animal-to-man transfusions to treat mental disorders. They had mixed success but didn't appear to cure the ailment. In 1818, James Blundell became interested in blood transfusion after witnessing the many deaths resulting from post-partum haemorrhage. He began with experiments in dogs and soon established it was possible to transfuse using a syringe if he worked quickly. Blundell established that cross-species transfusions didn't work and were dangerous. The early part of the 20th Century saw major developments in blood transfusion. Blood groups were identified by 1907 and the Kimpton Brown vessel (see 3675) slowed coagulation. These transfusion needles were used to collect and administer blood for transfusions.