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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

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Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin, ANZCA Curator 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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348 items

Ampoule, Propofol

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large clear glass ampoule with adhered manufacturer's label blue on white label containing the milky liquid of Propofol BC, 20mls.

Historical information

Propofol is an induction agent for anaesthesia and also used in intensive care to induce unconsciousness. Propofol doesn't dissolve in water so it comes in a white, oily solution and must be refrigerated before it’s used. The solution consists of soybean oil, fats purified from egg yolks, and glycerol. Propofol is used as an “induction agent”—the drug that causes loss of consciousness— for general anaesthesia in major surgery. In lower doses it is also used for “conscious sedation” of patients getting procedures on an outpatient basis at ambulatory surgery centres. The main reason propofol is the agent of choice is because it allows for very rapid recovery, is the perfect drug for insertion of laryngeal masks and is the agent of choice for infusions. It has largely replaced thiopentone, the original drug of choice, but this is still available in Australia and used in specific situations. Propofol was linked to the death of Michael Jackson.

Resuscitator, Ambu

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown rubber bag with a round metal filter at one end and a connector tube at the other. There is a blue plastic connector between the rubber bag and the metal tube.

Historical information

In 1937, the engineer Holger Hesse founded Testa Laboratory, which later became Ambu. Hesse developed products that made a difference to patients and doctors. The real breakthrough came in 1956 when the Ambu ventilation bag reached the market, developed together with anaesthetist Henning Ruben. It was the world’s first self-inflating resuscitator and a major milestone in emergency medical equipment. The Ambu bag became a permanent part of hospital and emergency services product ranges.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into blue plastic connector: AMBU-INTERNATIONAL / Ruben-Resuscitator Stamped into filter: Ambu logo - large capital A with AUER inside the legs of the A

Bottle, ACD Solution

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Clear glass bottle with white [discoloured] label on the front with red printed text. The bottle contains a yellowish solution. The metal screw-top lid has been covered with brown paper and a black rubber tie is draped around the shoulder of the bottle.

Historical information

Citrated blood was introduced by the Americans in 1917. This allowed blood administration to be delayed for up to two hours but there were many problems with transport, storage and infection in these early experimental days. This bottle contains ACD Solution (Anticoagulant Citrate Dextrose Solution) for ensuring blood doesn't coagulate during storage.

Phial, Ethyl Chloride

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Faded rectangular burgundy box containing a glass phial with metal and rubber lid that forms a spray nozzle. The lid of the box had a mustard coloured manufacturer's label wtih burgundy writing. The phial has a discoloured white label with red writing and a blue label with white writing.

Historical information

The glass phial contained liquid ethyl chloride, little pressure being required to liquefy the gas at room temperature. By directing the nozzle downwards at the skin or mucous membrane to be analgesed, a stream of liquid squirts out, vaporising on contact, thus producing transient local temperatures of approximately -10 qc. Ether's unpleasant smell agitated patients. Ethyl chloride's pleasant odour reduced agitation. It could be used for induction and worked quickly without irritating respiratory passages. Ethyl chloride spray could also be used as a local anaesthetic.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in white ink on blue label: IMPORTANT / NOT DESTROY THIS TUBE, IT CAN / BE REFILLED FOR / 2/10

Venous pressure manometer

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hand-made manometer is mounted on a flat, rectangular chrome platform. It comprises three valves labelled A, B and C. Valve C is connected to a glass measuring cylinder via a curved metal pipe. Item also includes a small spanner and brown plastic mock leather case with metal clasp, hinges and studs.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved into the floor of the device are the instructions on what valves to open and shut for 'infusion, fill and read'. Engraved on spanner: Geoffrey Kaye Engraved on clasp of case: Kaye BJ.2749

Painting - S.S. Ulimaroa

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on board painting of the merchant ship S S Ulimaroa on the Derwent River, Hobart, with landscape in distance and small steam boat on of main ship. Set in a plain gold and black wooden frame.

Historical information

Dr Bernie Dunn spotted a model of the merchant ship 'Ulimaroa' at Pollywoodside Museum after which he commissioned Ib Odfeldt, a Danish prize winning marine artist, to depict the vessel at sea.The painting was later gifted to ANZCA in 2006. John Traill, co-owner of Huddart Parker Ltd, named the ship in 1907 after his family home 'Ulimaroa' the building which was later purchased by the newly established ANZCA. The S S Ulimaroa was one of the popular ships in the Huddart Parker fleet that was in regular service between Australia and New Zealand from 1908 to 1934. This service was interrupted by WWI when it was commissioned by the NZ Government to carry troops. During the depression it was de-commissioned where it lay in Sydney Harbor until 1934 when it sailed under its own steam to Japan to be converted into scrap metal.

Inscriptions & Markings

[on frame in white ink] HUDDART PARKER LTD. / 1908 1934 / S/S ULIMAROA [on reverse in black ink] THIS PAINTING WAS COMMISSIONED / BY DR BERNARD L. DUNN & WIFE JEAN. / FOR THE ANZ COLLEGE OF ANESTHETIST 2006 ("ULIMAROA" ST KILDA RD MELBOURNE ) / TITLE: ULIMAROA ON THE DERWENT RIVER, (TASMANIA) / ARTIST IB ODFELDT / MEDIUM: OIL ON BOARD 2006 / THE SMALL STEAMER IN THE BACKGROUND S/S WARRENTINA / 808 CYGNET COAST RD / PETCHEY'S BAY 7109 TAS. / RED STAMP

Silver Tray

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plate tray, presented to Dr Lennard Travers on his retirement from Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1964. Embellishments and decorations around the edge of the tray also in silver. The middle of the tray has an inscription confirming the tray was presented to Dr Travers. Around the middle inscription are the signatures of other employees at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Manufacturer's mark on the reverse of the tray. No other distinguishing features.

Historical information

Object was gifted to Dr Lennard Travers upon his retirement from the Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1964. It was later donated to ANZCA. Lennard Travers, born in Melbourne in 1906, completed his MBBS at the University of Melbourne in 1930. After working for a brief period at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Travers travelled to the United Kingdom achieving his Fellowship at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. He returned to Australia prior to the outbreak of World War II serving as the honorary anaesthetist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. In 1950, Travers joined the Australian Society of Anaesthetists overseeing the development of the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. He was appointed Dean of the Faculty in 1959.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inscribed in centre of plate "Lennard G Travers, Anaesthetist, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1946 - 1964" •Inscribed around the central inscription are 24 signatures of anaesthetists and surgeons of the Royal Melbourne Hospital •Inscribed on back of tray "Old Sheffield Reproduction, Strachan"

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour photograph of a Lidwill anaesthetic machine sitting on carpet. A circular metal ether vaporiser sits on a brown wooden base, with brown tubes connecting to a trap bottle and metal valves, and a brown tube connected to the valve is coiled on the floor.

Historical information

The Lidwill machine was designed by Mark Lidwill in 1913, for the purpose of mechanical or insufflation anaesthesia. It was manufactured by Elliott Bros. of Sydney.

Book, Catalogue - Surgical Instruments and Appliances. Operation Tables, Sterilizers and Hospital Equipment. Sterilized Surgical Dressings, Sutures and Ligatures.

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black bound book with gold leaf text on front cover and spine and white internal pages with blue printed text and illustrations

Historical information

Surgical and anaesthetic equipment catalogue from 1938

Inscriptions & Markings

Book plate adhered to inside cover: SCIENTIA SAULTEM FERAMUS / SIR ANTHONY JEPHCOTT, BT. Handwritten in blue ink: J. Jephcott / NOV 1977

Blade, Laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Curved laryngoscope blade with light bulb only. It has visible scratches on top and back side of the blade. A rusty washer under the handle joint. Is also present in the blade base back side a curved shaped lamina attached by a screw. This blade correspond to a large size (adult) laryngoscope blade. It has stamped on the base inscriptions about: trade mark (PENLON), place where it was made (ENGLAND) and its material (Stainless).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the blade base, REGD. TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped on the back edge of the blade, STAINLESS

Photograph

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black and white photograph of the front view of an anaesthetic machine, labelled the Killian Apparatus. Glass flowmeters with four cylinders are on top of a white metal stand on castors. Hanging from the top of the machine are tubes connected to an inhaler bag with a netbag around it. A metal stool is to the right of the machine.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in black ink on surface: THE KILLIAN APPARATUS.

Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oblong shaped handle with textured grip. Attached is a laryngoscope blade in a cruved shaped with light tube running through one side.

Historical information

A laryngoscope is an instrument used to view the larynx (voice box), which is the opening to the trachea and lungs. It consists of a “blade,” which goes into the patient’s mouth, and a handle. Prior to 1943 when Macintosh introduced his curved blade, most laryngoscope blades were long and straight. The straight blades were used to directly hold the epiglottis. Macintosh’s curved blade works differently: it indirectly opens the epiglottis by applying pressure to a space between the root of the tongue and epiglottis, called the vallecula. The flange running along the left lower edge of Macintosh’s blade was also a novel innovation. It was designed to move the tongue to the side, which improved the view of the larynx and made more room for a breathing tube. The Macintosh Laryngoscope remains one of the most popular blades worldwide. (Source: Wood Library Museum) This laryngoscope was previously owned by John Mainland, as evidenced by the name etched into the handle. Mainland graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1950 with a Bachelor of Science degree. After researching and completing his medical degree, Mainland entered into the field of anaesthetics, training at the Royal Women's and Royal Children's Hospitals, later Alfred Hospital, in 1959. He completed training in 1964 and remained at the Alfred Hospital. During his career, he also became the first anaesthetist appointed to the position of Professor in Victoria. His other achievements include manufacturing a respiratory monitoring module that accompanied astronauts on the United States moon landing and developing a stimulator to lessen the risk of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients. Mainland became a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists in 1992, retiring from the profession in 1997.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched into top of handle: J.F. MAINLAND •Stamped into top of handle: REGD TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND •Stamped into base of handle: CLOSE [arrow] •Etched into base of blade: MAC / 4 •Stamped into side of blade: REGD TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND •Stamped into side of blade: STAINLESS

Picrotoxin

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hexagon shaped amber glass bottle with red rubber stopper. There is an ivory coloured manufacturer's label with black printed text adhered to the front of the bottle, along with some handwritten notations. The bottle has powdery contents.

Historical information

Picrotoxin is a bitter crystalline compound derived from the seed of an East Indian woody vine (Anamirta cocculus). It is a central nervous system and respiratory stimulant formerly used in barbiturate and other anaesthetic poisonings.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten on manufacturer's label: PURE FIRST USED 8/10/64 •Moulded into base of bottle: T195

Tube, Endotracheal, Uncuffed Rubber Nasal Tube

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown rubber tubing with three pairs of holes at one end and a bevelled edge at the other for nasal endotracheal intubation. There is a large safety pin stuck through the first pair of holes.

Historical information

This is an early example of an endotracheal tube invented by Ivan Magill. The shattered faces and jaws of wounded soldiers presented real difficulties for the administration of anaesthesia. Ivan Magill and Stanley Rowbotham developed endotracheal tubes for these procedures that were more efficient and practical than the earlier insufflation catheters.The attached safety pin was used to prevent the loss of the tube down the patient's nose.

Airway, Pharyngeal, Lumbard's or Mayo's

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal airway device consisting of eight curved strips of metal joined together at the top and bottom by a flattened circle of metal. There is an additional metal circle joining the eight strips of metal approximately one third from the top.

Historical information

This pharyngeal airway was captured at Tripoli, Syria in 1941 during World War II. It was a piece of equipment at the Italica Gens hospital.

Nitrous oxide gasometer

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main component of the nitrous oxide gasometer is a metal urn-shaped chamber form which an outlet valve and circular moulded tap allows for the flow of gas. A frame sits atop the chamber and comprises ornately-decorated metal flourishes and three anchoring pipes, two attached to each side of the chamber and one attached to the centre of the lid. The gasometer sits atop an ornately decorated cast iron stand with a circular base.

Ormsby's Inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler consists of an india-rubber flexible bag enclosed within a net bag to limit expansion. There is a soft metallic mouthpiece with india-rubber tubing around the edge. The tubing had to be purchased separately from the manufacturer. The body contains a wire cage with a similarly shaped hollow sponge into which ether was poured.

Historical information

Lambert Ormsby was a New Zealand surgeon who migrated to Ireland. He described his inhaler in a letter to the Lancet in 1877.Ormsby listed the advantages of his inhaler as simple, inexpensive, small quantity required to produce sleep, prevents evaporation of ether, portable and small (can be carried in pocket), short time to complete anaesthesia (two minutes) and safe. Disadvantages of this apparatus were that it had to be removed in order to recharge the sponge with ether or when anaesthesia becomes too deep. Considerable carbon dioxide accumulation developed and there would also be some oxygen lack. In thirty years of use, Ormsby's Inhaler underwent certain modifications, an exhalation valve was fitted to the mask and device for recharging the sponge with ether was later added. The Ormsby inhaler was modified by Carter Braine in 1898 with the aim of making it easier to clean. Essentially it is very similar except there is no net around the bag.

Inscriptions & Markings

Maker's details inscribed into metal ring around the bore: Barth Co. London.

B-D Yale Kaufman Syringe

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Glass and metal vein seeker syringe with a 10cc total volume. The barrel and plunger are manufactured from glass; the needle point from metal. The barrel is connected to the plunger via a metallic clip and chain and intravenous drip is added to the syringe via a side tube that is blocked with a corc stopper.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched on syringe barrel in brown lettering: "B-D Yale Kaufman' and '5942Y'. The serial number is also repeated on the plunger.

Resuscitator

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black rubber mask attached to a black concentina bag with a round metal filter at the end. Sits in its original wooden box with perspex lid. Instructions of use displayed on each side of the box.

Historical information

The Porton resuscitator was devised in 1951 at the British Chemical Defence Experimental Establishment in Porton, Sailsbury, as a bellows-valve-mask resuscitator. Extensive testing was undertaken over eight years, with the device being successfully used for air transport of polio patients, for emergency resuscitation in hospital wards, and by hospital orderlies.

Inscriptions & Markings

[white print on black rubber concertina bellows] PR 504 / P.B.C. 22 / - SEPT 1962

Vase, Glassware

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two tear shaped clear vases, one with opaque yellow colouring on the outer edge and base, one with opaque green colouring on the outer edge and base.

Inscriptions & Markings

etched underneath the base - EDDIE

Blade, Laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

A curved laryngoscope blade with bulb only. Its has an engraved detail about the place it belonged. Also, it has stamped on the blade the maker's seal and its material. At the base of the blade is stamped the place where it was made. The top of the blade has some scratches and the base has an oxide spot over the name of the place it was made.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on the blade, Anaes. Dept. Alfred Stamped on the base of the blade, MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped on the blade left side, STAINLESS Stamped on the blade on top of the base a circular seal with the letters, BOC

Plate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plated, medium size plate with central inscription. Displayed on a wooden stand and presented in a blue wooden box

Historical information

Presented to the ANZCA president David A Scott during the ANZCA ASM held in Brisbane, May 2017 by the College of Anaesthetists of Ireland.

Inscriptions & Markings

[Presented to the / Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists / on the occasion of their Silver Jubilee / from the / College of Anaesthetists of Ireland / May 2017]

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr Leona Wilson wearing the Presidential medal without the Presidential gown. She is wearing the New Zealand Order of Merit medal on her left lapel. She has her hands clasped in front of her and is seated on an angle in a chair in front of a plain grey background. The painting is mounted in a thin black frame and sits in a box frame coloured brown and gold.

Historical information

Dr Leona Willson was the first female to be elected president of ANZCA (2008 - 2010) and the first New Zealander to hold the position. In 2011, Dr Wilson was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit in which she is proudly wearing this medal in the portrait. The portrait was commissioned by ANZCA to mark the presidential term of Dr Leona Wilson which was unveiled at the ANZCA Council meeting June 2013. The artist, Jude Rae, is a Sydney based artist primarily known for her still life paintings, portraits and architectural interiors. Her artwork is held in major public and private collections in Australia, New Zealand, UK and USA.

Significance

Dr Leona Wilson was the first female ANZCA President and first President from New Zealand to hold the position.

Vase, Glassware

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Tear shaped, emerald green, hand-blown glass

Historical information

Dr Briscoe was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Pain Medicine in 2008 and gifted the vase at the end of her term in 2010. Dr Briscoe was the first woman to be appointed Dean of the Faculty. The artist Robert Wynne is an accomplished glass artist in Australia. His artworks are held in significant public and private collections nation wide and overseas. Public collections include the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Artbank and the Queensland Contemporary Art Gallery. Wynne's artworks are also part of the private collections of Bill Clinton, Sir Elton John and the Royal Family Collection of Japan.

Inscriptions & Markings

Etched on base - DENIZEN

Inhaler, Hewitt's (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Bowl shaped inhaler with a glass bowl base and metal dome top with a connector which appears to be for a rebreather bag. There is a metal switch at the base of the glass bowl to alter or regulate the flow.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into central tube: COXETER LONDON Stamped into side of metal dome: 6460

Inhaler, Probyn Williams (sectioned)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oval shaped metal inhaler with attached metal facemask. The inhaler has been sectioned to reveal its inner workings and the ether chamber has been painted black while the air-channel has been painted red. The manufacturer's logo, stamped into the inhaler, has been sectioned as well, leaving only half the information available.

Historical information

Dr Geoffrey Kaye was a clinical anaesthetist at a time when very few full time anaesthetists existed. He was passionate about the training of future anaesthetists and would often section anaesthetic equipment to reveal its inner workings and show those to students. This Probyn Williams Inhaler is one apparatus which has been sectioned and the various elements of the inhaler have been painted to highlight the differences in function.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved on dome side of inhaler: PROBYN WILLIAMS / G.K. sect. 1939 •Stamped into dome side of inhaler MAYER & / LON

Insufflation anaesthesia machine

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large leather suitcase style bag divided into two levels containing and insufflation anaesthesia machine.

Historical information

In 1913, Mark Cowley Lidwill designed a machine for the purpose of mechanical or insufflation anaesthesia. The Lidwill machine was a portable machine weighing 7kg that could easily be packed into two small bags. The machine involved compressed air being delivered to an ether vaporiser. An ether/air control device allowed varying concentrations of ether to be delivered. The ether vaporiser could be immersed in hot water to prevent cooling and the ether temperature was measured. From the vaporiser, the ether/air mixture went through a trap bottle, then to a crude mercury blow-off valve and subsequently to the patient.

Junker's apparatus

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Glass jar with liquid measure markers etched onto. The jar has a metal lid, with a metal tube descending into the jar. Two metal tubes are protuding out of the top of the lid, and each has a small section of rubber tubing attached. There is also a metal hook, used to attached the jar to the physicians (anaesthetist's) lapel.

Historical information

Junker's inhalers are a "blow over" device used with a hand-held bellows to bubble air through liquid chlooform and to the patient. It was initially inteded for use with bichloride of methylene, a mixture of chloroform and methyl alcohol. Ferdinand Adalbert Junker introduced his inhaler in 1867 as appointed physician to Samaritan Free Hospital for Women (although it didn't have that name until c.1904).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped into frame of metal lid: LONDON MADE

Cylinder, Oxygen

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Medium sized black coloured cylinder with rounded base once containing Oxygen with a large black on white diamond shaped manufacturer's label adhered to the front.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed on to manufacturer's label: OFFICIALLY PREPARED FOR MED? / AUSTOX [in logo] / COMPRESSED / OXYGEN / CONTENTS / 33 [handwritten in pencil] Imperial Gallons / KEEP COOL / Australiand Oxygen and Industrial ? / Pty. Ltd. / MELBOURNE

Handle, Flagg

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Flagg laryngoscope handle only. The handle has a serrated grip for easy use; it is also a container for two batteries and has a switch on its base with an ON - OFF switch black button which quite rusty. The handle has a screw on top of it, used to secure the blade. The full piece has minor scratches over its surface. It has a small crack in the switch area and a missing screw bellows it. The handle has an inscription about the manufacturer company seal and name stamped at the top of the handle ring.

Historical information

Designed by Dr Paluel Flagg around 1915 and later used for 25 years. This laryngoscope was designed to meet certain expectations about laryngeal access and to avoid major tracheal injuries in patients (Ball, 2014). Article reference: C. M. Ball & R. N. Westhorpe. 2014. Anaesthesia & Intensive Care. Nov 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p687-688. 2p.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on top handle blade base, AUBURN, [W/A seal], N.Y.U.S.A. Stamped on the handle base power source button, ON [red colour], OFF [blue colour]