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Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History Melbourne, Victoria

Dr Geoffrey Kaye established a museum from his private collection of anaesthetic apparatus in 1946.

The Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History is now part of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The museum showcases over 170 years of advances in anaesthesia and pain medicine, and is one of the largest and most diverse collections of its type in the world.

Contact Information

location
ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 8517 5309
Contact

Opening Hours

Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm Bookings are essential

Entry Fee

Free entry

Location

ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria

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The collection focuses on the development of anaesthesia practice from its beginning, in 1846, through to contemporary practice. A number of related medical specialties are also represented in the collection, such as pain medicine and hyperbaric medicine. The collection focuses on the equipment, apparatus and instruments designed for advancement in practice, as well as the lives and contributions of the many individuals who have grown the specialty.

Significance

The museum’s collection looks at the history of anaesthesia and pain medicine, as well as other related medical specialties. It allows us to follow the transformation from an unskilled and unreliable art into a highly scientific medical specialty.

Dwight Crapson 9 September 2015 7:44 AM

My Grandmother was killed during a medical procedure around 1924. The story, as I understand it was that she was going to have her tonsils removed, and that the doctor had a new ether dispensing machine which caused her death by an overdose of ether. This occurred somewhere in Kansas, if I am not mistaken. As I understand it, this was not an isolated incident, and the machines were removed from use after some 28 or so patients suffered the same fate. Do you have any information that would verify, and possibly add details to this story? I am somewhat interested in seeing what the machine looked like, and knowing more about it, etc. Thank you, Dwight A. Crapson

Monica Cronin 9 September 2015 9:52 AM

Dear Dwight, That is an unfortunate story from your family's history. To investigate the story further, I would recommend you try to get more background information such as the exact date and which hospital was involved. I would recommend you contact the Kansas Digital Newspaper Archive (https://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-digital-newspaper-program/16126) who may be able to help you track down this information. Such a large number of deaths may well have been reported in a local newspaper and may include a name or description of the equipment used. When you have some more information please feel free to get back in touch and we may be able to show you something from our collection that matches the equipment used. Otherwise, the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Illinois may be able to help (http://www.woodlibrarymuseum.org/). Good luck with your search. Cheers Monica Cronin Curator, Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History

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280 items

De Ford Somniform Inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

This inhaler is composed of metal and rubber. The oral mask and rubber covered nasal mask are connected to a curved rubber covered support that was placed on the patient's forehead to hold the inhaler in place. The gas was administered via a long tube; the terminus designed to allow for the placement of a vial containing the anaesthetic drug and a rebreather bag mount.

Historical information

The De Ford Inhaler was introduced in 1913 and was designed to allow anaesthesia to continue through the nose while dental surgery was happening.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inscribed on the back of the mouth inhaler: 'Dr De Ford's Universal Inhaler for Somniform Nitrous Oxide etc. E. De Trey & Sons Phila. PA U.S. Pat. Pending.'

Tube, Endotracheal, Cuffed

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Set of brown and orange cuffed rubber tubes with an second, finer, rubber tube extending from the cuff. The tubes are all for use in oral endotracheal intubation.

Inscriptions & Markings

Versions of the following are printed in black ink on each of the tubes: [size] MEDICAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT MAGILL'S TUBE / MADE IN ENGLAND or; [size] ORAL Medishield / MAGILL / CUFFED / MADE IN UNITED KINGDOM

Blade, Laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Seward laryngoscope blade only. No light bulb is present in this item. Size1 for infants use. Minor scratches and dust around the piece. Some hit marks on top of the blade and base. Rusty washer under the joint base. Stamped on the base, lateral side: the trade mark details (PENLON), place where it was made (ENGLAND) and at the back side of the blade the type of blade (SEWARD) and the size (1).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped, REGD. TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND

Certificate, Fellowship

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Printed certificate from the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) awarded to Robin William Smallwood as a Fellowship. Printed in black ink at the top of the certificate is the RACS coat of arms. The certificate is dated 25 Feburary 1965 and has been signed by President of the College, Member Executive Committee, Dean of the Faculty and the Secretary.

Historical information

Robin William Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness and was awarded the Orton Medal posthumously. The Orton Medal is the highest single achievement the College can bestow. Anaesthesia had its origins in October 1846 in America, by May 1847 news of ether anaesthesia had reached Australian shores and by June 1847 Australian medical practitioners had begun experimenting with and demonstrating ether anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not really recognised as a distinct branch of medicine in Australia until the first Diploma of Anaesthesia course began in Sydney in 1944. The specialty grew quickly and by 1952 the Faculty of Anaesthesia at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons had been established. Within 40 years the Faculty had grown to such an extent it became a College in its own right and continues to offer training and professional support to anaesthetists.

Pugh's inhaler - replica

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The main container comprises an inverted funnel shaped glass jar that is connected to the top glass globe via an etched glass valve. Sea sponges are located within the glass vessel and the woven cloth tube is connected to the base of the glass container.

Historical information

Replica of original glass ether inhaler used by Dr William Russ Pugh in Launceston in 1847.

Significance

William Russ Pugh is credited with being the first person in Australia to administer ether as anaesthesia. Pugh created his own ether inhaler based on a report in the London Illustrated News, dated January 1847. The paper reached Pugh in May and by June he had already designed, made and used the ether inhaler. On 7 June 1847 he performed two surgeries using anaesthesia. He also had a journalist present to record the event.

Inhaler, Bruck

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler is oval shaped with two halves. One half should be made of glass [missing] to allow observation of the ether level. A vertical cross tube, 22mm in diameter passes between the face-piece and the bag [broken]. There is a stopcock for admission of oxygen or nitrous oxide opposite the bag attachment. There is a central tube, 28mm in diameter, with controllable ports on either side.

Historical information

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Lambert Bruck. Bruck added a glass dome which enabled the level of ether to be monitored during administration. This was a revolutionary change as it removed guess work from the process.

Inscriptions & Markings

The Bruck Inhaler is a modification of the Clover Inhaler, designed by Lambert Bruck. Bruck added a glass dome which enabled the level of ether to be monitored during administration. This was a revolutionary change as it removed guess work from the process.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Flagg

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small sized Flagg straight blade with a slight curve at the distal end and a 'U' shape canal with light bulb attached. The piece has a general excellent condition and brightness over its surface. The laryngoscope blade type is stamped on top of the blade and the manufacturer seal is located at the base back side of the blade.

Historical information

Designed by Dr Paluel Flagg around 1915 and later used for 25 years. This laryngoscope blade was designed to meet certain expectations about laryngeal richness and to avoid major tracheal injuries in patients. (Ball, 2014) Article reference: C. M. Ball & R. N. Westhorpe. 2014. Anaesthesia & Intensive Care. Nov 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p687-688. 2p.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on top of the blade, FLAGG LARYNGOSCOPE Stamped seal at the base back side, W/A [inside a triangle shape]

Syringe

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small ornate metal syringe with raised ridge at either end and in the middle. Tapers to a point at the distal end with pencil like extrusion. Finger ring at the proximal end.

Historical information

Charles Gabriel Pravaz (1791-1853) was a French orthopedic surgeon and inventor of the hypodermic syringe. In 1844, Irish physician Francis Rynd (1811-1861) invented the hollow needle. In 1853, French physician Charles Pravaz developed the first practical metal syringe. Pravaz added a fine, hollow needle to the end of his syringe instead of the tube. This was an important innovation. Yet in the pre-antiseptic era it was a mixed blessing. The use of injections rather than oral drug administration can more readily promote the spread of disease as well as facilitating its cure. An understanding of the germ theory of disease - and the cardinal importance of using sterile needles - awaited the discoveries of Lister, Pasteur and Koch. But intravenous injection allows extremely rapid pain-relief - and the induction of general anaesthesia when suitable agents were developed.

Phial, Ethyl Chloride

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Faded rectangular burgundy box containing a glass phial with metal and rubber lid that forms a spray nozzle. The lid of the box had a mustard coloured manufacturer's label wtih burgundy writing. The phial has a discoloured white label with red writing and a blue label with white writing.

Historical information

The glass phial contained liquid ethyl chloride, little pressure being required to liquefy the gas at room temperature. By directing the nozzle downwards at the skin or mucous membrane to be analgesed, a stream of liquid squirts out, vaporising on contact, thus producing transient local temperatures of approximately -10 qc. Ether's unpleasant smell agitated patients. Ethyl chloride's pleasant odour reduced agitation. It could be used for induction and worked quickly without irritating respiratory passages. Ethyl chloride spray could also be used as a local anaesthetic.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in white ink on blue label: IMPORTANT / NOT DESTROY THIS TUBE, IT CAN / BE REFILLED FOR / 2/10

Analgesia device, patient controlled

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Two parallel sections enclosed in cream coloured metal casing and joined in the centre via a brown metal section that also forms the base and stand. The left side has a dark brown perspex cover with a small brushed metal latch and handle. The right has a grey metal panel with dial, knobs and a rolled paper dispenser. A clear plastic intravenous bag is attached to the device by a clear plastic tube.There is also a black plastic coated wire attached to a handle with a red button on top. This is used for the patient to administer the analgesia.

Historical information

Patient controlled analgesia, or PCA, was developed in the 1960s. This mode of opioid administration allows patients to directly respond to their individual levels of pain. It is estimated there are now somewhere between six and 15 million uses annually.

Needles, Acupuncture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Twenty six (26) fine metal needles with twisted copper ends used for acupuncture.

Blow gun

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Hollow bamboo tube with mouthpiece at one end. The tube is decorated with intricate carvings with floral and geometric motifs. An organic fibre has been used to secure the mouthpiece and at several other points. The tube is a blowpipe for hunting.

Historical information

Used by the Sakai people, Kuala Langat, Selangor (Malaysia), 1936. Whilst Malaysian, this blow-gun is analogous to that used by Brazilian Indians with curare. The gun is of bamboo, with a highly polished inner tube of the same. The darts are reeds, made directional by knobs of a balsa-like wood, and poisoned with a mixture of brucine (from the ipoh, or upas tree) and cobra-venom.

Blade, Laryngoscope, Macintosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Semi straight infant Macintosh blade with light bulb only. The item has a general good conservation and completeness regarding its hinge piece and base bulb connector. It has stamped the manufacturer name (PENLON) and the place where it was made (New Zealand).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped, REGD TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN NEW ZEALAND

Needles, Suture

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Folded paper packet containing suture needles, with original seals still in place. The packet is white with blue printed text.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in blue ink on reverse: 1/2 CIRCLE / CUTTING EDGE

Blade, Laryngoscope

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Curved laryngoscope blade with light bulb only. It has visible scratches on top and back side of the blade. A rusty washer under the handle joint. Is also present in the blade base back side a curved shaped lamina attached by a screw. This blade correspond to a large size (adult) laryngoscope blade. It has stamped on the base inscriptions about: trade mark (PENLON), place where it was made (ENGLAND) and its material (Stainless).

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the blade base, REGD. TRADE MARK / PENLON / MADE IN ENGLAND Stamped on the back edge of the blade, STAINLESS

Handle, Flagg

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Flagg laryngoscope handle only. The handle has a serrated grip for easy use; it is also a container for two batteries and has a switch on its base with an ON - OFF switch black button which quite rusty. The handle has a screw on top of it, used to secure the blade. The full piece has minor scratches over its surface. It has a small crack in the switch area and a missing screw bellows it. The handle has an inscription about the manufacturer company seal and name stamped at the top of the handle ring.

Historical information

Designed by Dr Paluel Flagg around 1915 and later used for 25 years. This laryngoscope was designed to meet certain expectations about laryngeal access and to avoid major tracheal injuries in patients (Ball, 2014). Article reference: C. M. Ball & R. N. Westhorpe. 2014. Anaesthesia & Intensive Care. Nov 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 6, p687-688. 2p.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on top handle blade base, AUBURN, [W/A seal], N.Y.U.S.A. Stamped on the handle base power source button, ON [red colour], OFF [blue colour]

Slide

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Colour slide mounted in white slide case. Image depicts Clover Inhaler with cloth rebreather bag and leather facemask attached

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in pencil: EMBLEY'S / 9448

Electroplated Silver Basket

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Antique Sheffield electroplated silver, copper basket with swing handle. The bowl of the basket is octagonal with incised geometric and circular pattern along the perimeter. Engraved in the bowl of the basket is an image of a phoenix including a smaller image of a phoenix engraved on the swing handle. The silver has worn in some places in particular around the image of the phoenix in the bowl of the basket.

Historical information

This object was donated by Dr Susan Kelly in memory of Dr Loraine Hibbard (1916-2002) Emeritus Consultant, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW. The maker and date of this object is unverified due to lack of supporting evidence. It is unknown as to the significance of the engraved Phoenix.

Anaesthetic, Novocain

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Square brown glass bottle with round neck and organ rubber stopper. A strand of wire has been wound around the stopper. A discoloured white manufacturer's label is stuck to the front of the bottle with black and red printed text. There is approximately half the liquid remaining in the bottle.

Historical information

Novocaine is a local anaesthetic for dentistry. Its first known use was 1906.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into the bottom of the bottle: J282

Book, Instruction Manual - XIV Golden Rules of Anaesthesia, 3rd edn

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Book with beige coloured cloth over heavy cardboard cover with gold leaf printing on front cover.

Historical information

This book is the third edition of the "Golden Rules of Anaesthesia" and, while it is instructional in style, predates any formal text book on the subject. The first text book in Australia, Practical Anaesthesia, was published in 1932.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in black ink on spine: Anaesthesia •Handwritten in black ink on white label adhered to back cover: A.S.A. •Handwritten in blue and black ink on inside cover: Presented to the / ASA / by / W.D. Counsell / 17 June 1952 •Stamped in blue/purple ink on fly sheet: AUSTRALIAN SOCIETY OF ANAESTHETISTS / FACULTY OF ANAESTHETISTS / ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS

Inhaler, Analgesia, Penthrane

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wooden box with metal clasp and hinges and two sections inside, divided by balsa wood. One side contains an amber plastic and black rubber facial mask, along with a inhaler tube and felt square. The other side contains a cylindrical metal device with a black plastic handle secured to one end and a portal for attaching the facial mask at the other.

Historical information

Originally distributed by Abbott Laboratories. This device is used for the self-administration of Penthane, an analgesic. Designed for use in emergency rooms, obstetrics, orthopaedics and surgical outpatients.

Metaclopramide (Maxolon)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Clear glass ampoule with adhered green and white manufacturer's label containing Maxolon.

Historical information

Metoclopramide blocks dopamine receptors in the brain in the areas responsible for the vomiting reflex. It is still used to treat nausea and vomiting that occurs post-operatively or from chemotherapy but there are more effective agents now.

Oscillotonometer, von Recklinghausen

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown leather case with silver clasp and brown leather handle. Case contains Dr. von Recklinghausen Scala Alternans Oscillotonometer – a round silver pressure gauge with paper scale and needle point reader. The silver valve and lever at the bottom of the gauge connects black and orange rubber tubing to the grey linen arm cuff rolled closed with Velcro and a rubber inflation bulb.

Historical information

This oscillotonometer was owned by Dr. Herbert Claus Newman, an Anaesthetist who gained his diploma in Anaesthetics in 1956. Dr Newman served in the Vietnam War and was also one of over 50 of Australia's medical professionals who signed a joint statement in 2004 condemning the Federal Government for committing Australian troops to the Iraq war.

Inscriptions & Markings

Yellow sticker on top of case in yellow type: H. NEWMAN Printed on face of gauge: Oscillotonometer / n. Dr. von Recklinghausen / "SCALA ALTERNANS" / 6585868 / S|K Printed on scale near zero reading: mmHg Printed on scale near highest reading: mm Hg = Torr Printed on scale is numbers 0 to 300 in increments of 20 Stamped on reverse of valve: 148

Plate

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plated, medium size plate with central inscription. Displayed on a wooden stand and presented in a blue wooden box

Historical information

Presented to the ANZCA president David A Scott during the ANZCA ASM held in Brisbane 2017

Inscriptions & Markings

[Presented to the / Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists / on the occasion of their Silver Jubilee / from the / College of Anaesthetists of Ireland / May 2017]

Laryngoscope, MacIntosh

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Curved laryngoscope blade and handle. The laryngoscope blade is identified as a MAC 3 RIESTER blade and is attached to the textured handle with a serrated grip for ease of use. The handle is also a battery deposit which has stamped on the lid base the manufacturer's name and the place where it was made.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped on the lid base of the handle, Penlon R [trademark] / Made in U K Printed on the blade base, MAC 3 RIESTER Printed on the blade base, STAINLESS STEEL C E / GERMANY Stamped on the blade base, TDD Stamped on the blade base, G

Inhaler, Ether, Dewee

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal inhaler with shaped rim edge

Historical information

This is a simple metal mask with an ether chamber surmounting it. The patient breathes air down through the variable orifice over the surface of ether and in through the variable orifice over the surface of ether and in through the inspiratory valve. Exhalation was by means of the expiratory valve placed in the centre of the mask. All channels are extremely small and would offer considerable resistance to respiration.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved by hand into side of mask: DEWEE'S ETHER / INHALER.. 1901. Stamped into side of mask: J.E. LEECO / PATD. NOV. 12-1901 / 400

Inhaler, Probyn Williams

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Black round topped box with brass hooks [missing] at front and brass hinges at rear. The initials T.E.V.H. are printed in gold leaf on the front. There is a black fabric handle on the top. Inside the box is black padding with the manufacturer's logo printed in gold leaf. There is a square section in the base of the box for holding the square clear glass bottle for ether. The pear-shaped mask is made of metal. There is also a metal ether measure for pouring the ether. The metal inhaler is ovoid shaped. The rotating gauge has a series of numbers engraved onto the inhaler for measurement. There is an elbow joint attaching a re-breather bag, with a small amount of waxy paper remaining attached with a thin ribbon. There is a small glass bulb encased in a metal housing.

Historical information

Hurley, Sir Thomas Ernest Victor (1888-1958) was gifted this Probyn Williams inhaler in 1914. After studying at Melbourne University, Victorian-born Hurley was a Medical Officer at the Royal Melbourne Hospital until he commenced private practice in Collins Street. He was appointed Captain Australian Army Medical Corps, AIF and served in Gallipoli with the 2nd Field Ambulance. He served in Enypt, London, and the Western Front during World War 1. He gained a Companion of the Order of St George and St Michael in 1917. Upon return to Melbourne he held positions such as surgeon to Victoria Police (1928-1956), elected to Council of the Victorian branch of the British Medical Association, member of the Charities Board of Victoria and foundation member of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and chaired the Flying Personnel Research Committee m a consulting surgeon at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. This apparatus is transitional between Clover's and Hewitt's having Clover's narrow "ways" and compact size, but using Hewitt's ether-control lever.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in gold leaf on front of box: T.E.V.H. •Printed in gold leaf on inside lid of box: MAYER & MELTZER / LONDON / MELBOURNE & CAPE TOWN •Engraved on side of inhaler: PRESENTED / TO / T.E.V. Hurley Esq.,M.D.M.S. / by / THE M.S.S. / 15.6.14. •Engraved on reverse side of inhaler: PROBYN WILLIAMS / ETHER INHALER •Moulded into connector on elbow joint: MAYER & MELTZER •Stamped into base of metal pourer: MAYER & MELTZER / LONDON •Blue sticker with white printed text on front of inhaler: O.2.21.

Needles

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown and white cardboard box containing blue cardboard tray with six (6) needles embedded into it. There is allocation for twelve (12) needles.

Ampoule, Propofol

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Large clear glass ampoule with adhered manufacturer's label blue on white label containing the milky liquid of Propofol BC, 20mls.

Historical information

Propofol is an induction agent for anaesthesia and also used in intensive care to induce unconsciousness. Propofol doesn't dissolve in water so it comes in a white, oily solution and must be refrigerated before it’s used. The solution consists of soybean oil, fats purified from egg yolks, and glycerol. Propofol is used as an “induction agent”—the drug that causes loss of consciousness— for general anaesthesia in major surgery. In lower doses it is also used for “conscious sedation” of patients getting procedures on an outpatient basis at ambulatory surgery centres. The main reason propofol is the agent of choice is because it allows for very rapid recovery, is the perfect drug for insertion of laryngeal masks and is the agent of choice for infusions. It has largely replaced thiopentone, the original drug of choice, but this is still available in Australia and used in specific situations. Propofol was linked to the death of Michael Jackson.

Analgesic, Penthrane

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Empty brown glass bottle with green manufacturer's label, with white writing and a white plastic lid. Green liquid measures have been printed on the side of the bottle.

Historical information

Methoxyflurane Hydrogenated ether (ether with one or more hydrogen atoms replaced with a halogen atom). It is a powerful analgesic although is also a respiratory depressant. The use of Penthrane foreshadowed the patient controlled analgesia devices.

Inscriptions & Markings

White sticker stuck to manufacturer's label: Expiration Date / Feb. 1, 1976 / Lot 854-1663

Book, Catalogue - Surgical Instruments and Appliances, eighth edition

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Grey/brown hardcover book with cloth covering produced as a trade catalogue for surgical instruments and appliances, including anaesthetic equipment and apparatus

Needle

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Brown and white coloured cardboard box with white and black manufacturer's label adhered to front with plastic tray inside box containing twelve (12) hypodermic needles.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded into plastic tray: B-D TWIN PAK Stamped into flat section of connector: B-D 27 Stamped in red ink on inside base of box base: 6 MAR. 1965

Book, Catalogue - A Catalogue of Respirators and Allied Equipment

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Pale blue [discoloured] cardboard covered book with blue pages printed in black ink, bound by a staple through the spine.

Historical information

Undated catalogue outlining a range of respirators available through Garthur (London) Ltd.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on front cover: P. Penn

Mask, Murray

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Triangular shaped wire mask covered by flannel. The flannel is sewn over frame and stitched around the base and along the vertical wire. The style and shape is similar to Murray's mask, which was used for the administration of chloroform, however this variation is not collapsible like Murray's mask.

Historical information

Seems to be a non- collapsible mask. Otherwise is a similar, thinner variety of Murray's mask, which was used for the administration of choloroform. John Murray was born in England, 1843 and described his wire mask in 1868 as a young chloroformist at Middlesex Hospital. It was wedge-shaped and made of thick wire and designed to be folded. The removable cover was originally made of several layers of flannel. Murray’s mask became very popular, especially in Australia, and was generally used with a single layer of flannel without an aperture or opening, as is this example. John Murray was an enthusiastic and innovative physician who also had an interest in nitrous oxide anaesthesia and conducted a series of experiments with J. Burdon Sanderson on dental patients comparing nitrous oxide to pure nitrogen. His career was short-lived and he died just before his 30th birthday. (Ball, C 1995, 'Cover Note: Murray's Chloroform Mask', Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vol. 23, No. 2, pg. 135)

Inhaler, Clover (modified)

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal based inhaler with glass dome lid. From the glass dome an elbow joint leads to a bulb for a rebreather bag [no bag]. There is a cork sealing an opening at the rear of the metal base and a blue sticker adhered.

Historical information

Dr. Joseph Clover (1825-1882), an English physician, first described his Portable Regulating Ether Inhaler on Jan. 20, 1877. Clover was an especially sought after anesthesiologist and early pioneer in the specialty. This was the best-known of many inhalers that Clover designed. The dome-shaped reservoir was turned to points on a control dial to gradually increase or decrease the percentage of the air that passed over the ether. Several inventors based new inhalers on this, while the original continued to be manufactured as late as the beginning of WWII

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in white on blue sticker: O.2.10 Manufacturer's logo moulded into metal insert

Painting, portrait

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on canvas of Associate Professor Neville J Davis, seated at an angle, wearing the Presidential gown and badge. The backdrop is plain with a mock outline of a window. Mounted in a plain gold frame with a brass plaque affixed to center of frame

Historical information

Associate Professor Neville J Davis, was appointed President of ANZCA in 1995 until 1996. Professor Davis was a member of both the last Board of the Faculty and the first Council of the newly formed Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Further information about Professor Davis can be found on Lives of the Fellows,http://anzca.online-exhibition.net/fellows/fellows-1992/neville-james-davis/ The artist Ben Joel is a Western Australian artist, well known for his commissioned portraits and contemporary pieces in most media. Joel's artworks are represented in private and public art collections.

Inscriptions & Markings

[plaque] ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR / NEVILLE J DAVIS / PRESIDENT 1995-1996

Laryngoscope, Lynah

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Lynah's Ovoid Laryngeal Speculum with the light bulb and part of the connection wires still attached. Its semi square shape is characteristic of this kind of instrument, also has an screwable pointed end attachment. It has dusty and grey spots inside the canal of the blade near the light bulb canal. Solder spots are visible at the top of the blade as attachment of the laryngeal speculum blade base. General discolouration over the surface of this piece and hit marks present at the base of the handle. It was roughly engraved over the handle the owner’s details and year. Stamped at the base of the handle are the manufacturer’s details partially visible.

Inscriptions & Markings

Engraved at the handle, U N N A M E T . A D E L A I D E . c. 194[6] . Stamped at the base of the handle, [first line worn away might be MADE BY] / E / A D / [might be an S] YDN [might be an EY] / CHROME PLAT [incomplete word due stamp near the edge]

Vaporiser, Tecota

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Khaki metal multi layered cylinder. Set on top of khaki metal plate with four (4) rubber feet.

Historical information

Used by mothers during childbirth, the anaesthetic Trilene (trichloroethylene) was inhaled through a face mask [missing] attached to the rubber tubing [missing] and the vaporising chamber. The Trilene was poured into the chamber to be turned into a vapour. The machine was used in the obstetric wards at University College Hospital, London. Trilene was introduced in the 1940s. The machine was made by Cyprane Ltd.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in red on top level of vaporiser: Cyprane Ltd •Stamped in red on serial plate: TECOTA MARK 6 / CHARGE WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE B.P. / CYPRANE LTD. SERIAL No / KEIGHLEY / YORKS. / T1469 •Clear sticker with red printed text stuck on metal plate: PAT No 646680 / PATENTS PENDING

Painting - Dust Off

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Oil painting on board of a scene in which a military helicopter is about to land with a group of soldiers in the foreground, one wounded and one soldier standing. A cargo military helicopter is in the distance flying away from the scene. The painting is set in a gold frame.

Historical information

The painting was donated to ANZCA in 1995 by Dr Bernard Dunn.

Inscriptions & Markings

[plaque affixed to centre front of frame] DUST OFF \ BY BRUCE FLETCHER \ DEPICTING THE MEDICAL EVACUATION \ OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS FROM THE FIELD \ IN VIETNAM \ PRESENTED BY \ DR BERNARD L. DUNN

Homeopathic Kit

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Wooden box with two drawers secured by a brass pin inside top lid, containing a variety of homeopathic substances. Some of the cork tops are missing, others are broken but sealed. Some of the cork tops have the abbreviated name of the contents on them.

Historical information

The Sydney Homeopathic Dispensary was established in July 1858. At a time when medicine was become more scientific and evidence based, homeopathy relied on the Galenic tradition to treat patients.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in gold leaf on the inside of the lid: JOHN BELL. / HOMEOPATHIC CHEMIST. / GEORGE STREET / SYDNEY.

Bottle, Glass

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small square based glass bottle with round neck, possibly used to hold ether. Found inside carry box with other unrelated objects including brown stopper which does not fit in bottle. Appropriate stopper for glass bottle is not present.

Historical information

The bottle was probably used for holding ether as part of a doctors medical kit. The bottle has visible side mould seams on the shoulder which discontinues or fades at the lip, a tooled finish and the glass has bubbles. There is no pontil-scar or mark on the base of the bottle, but there is a circular mould seam on the base.

Inscriptions & Markings

Small amount of brown residue inside bottle. Bubbles in side of glass. Brown marks on outer bottle. Scratches inside bottle neck. Glass stopper missing.

Ampoules, Anaesthetic

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Square cardboard box containing 100 separate ampoules of pharmaceuticals. Each ampoule is held in place by a cardboard cover with a round cut-out to match the ampoule. There are ten rows of ten.

Historical information

This multi-purpose kit contains drugs for resuscitation, sedation and local anaesthetic. It could also assist in the delivery of a baby. The kit holds a selection of pharmaceuticals that would most likely have been used by a general practitioner anywhere between the 1950s and 1980s.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on side of box: OCTAPRESSIN Handwritten in blue ink on top of box: 5 units / 100mls saline Handwritten in blue ink on side of box: OCTAPRESSIN / PLV2 Stamped in black ink on manufacturer's label on side of box: Physician's Sample / not for sale / Batch 62 164

Vase

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Small cream coloured, round vase with brown glazed rings around the shoulder of the vase.

Historical information

The vase was made from the liquefaction that came out of the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011. The vase was gifted to the College by Professor Edward Shipton (known as Ted) on his retirement as Dean of the Faculty of Pain Medicine, and from Council. Professor Shipton is from New Zealand. The gift was accompanied by a card with the following inscription: "Thank you for allowing me to be a small part of your great institution as Councillor and Faculty Dean these past two years. My gift to the College is a small vase. This vase was made from the liquefaction that came out of the 22 February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake. It pays tribute to the medical personnel, our Fellows and Trainees that gave so much during that time to preserve life and relieve suffering. Sincerely Edward (Ted) Shipton"

Silver Tray

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Silver plate tray, presented to Dr Lennard Travers on his retirement from Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1964. Embellishments and decorations around the edge of the tray also in silver. The middle of the tray has an inscription confirming the tray was presented to Dr Travers. Around the middle inscription are the signatures of other employees at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Manufacturer's mark on the reverse of the tray. No other distinguishing features.

Historical information

Object was gifted to Dr Lennard Travers upon his retirement from the Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1964. It was later donated to ANZCA. Lennard Travers, born in Melbourne in 1906, completed his MBBS at the University of Melbourne in 1930. After working for a brief period at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Travers travelled to the United Kingdom achieving his Fellowship at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. He returned to Australia prior to the outbreak of World War II serving as the honorary anaesthetist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. In 1950, Travers joined the Australian Society of Anaesthetists overseeing the development of the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. He was appointed Dean of the Faculty in 1959.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inscribed in centre of plate "Lennard G Travers, Anaesthetist, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, 1946 - 1964" •Inscribed around the central inscription are 24 signatures of anaesthetists and surgeons of the Royal Melbourne Hospital •Inscribed on back of tray "Old Sheffield Reproduction, Strachan"

Ethyl chloride inhaler

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

The inhaler comprises a black rubber face mask that connects to a metal circular chamber from which two white rubber valves are used to administer the anaesthetic agent. The ethyl chloride vials are labelled 'Kelene', a brand name. A waxed paper rebreather bag is attached to this metal chamer.

Historical information

The item was collected by Dr Geoffrey Kaye from a Vichy French military hospital during World war II.

Medal, Orton

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Die cast medal mounted in a hard blue velour base, with a wooden gold frame. The medal is placed inside the base, with a red velvet ribbon coming out from underneath, used for removing the medal. Underneath the medal is a two cent coin, stuck to the base. Where the medal rests is covered in red velvet as well.

Historical information

The Robert Orton Medal is awarded at the discretion of the Council of the College (formerly the Board of the Faculty), the sole criterion being distinguished service to anaesthesia. The award was established by the Faculty of Anaesthetists, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, in 1967. Robin William Smallwood was Dean of the Faculty of Anaesthetists at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons from 1986 - 1987. Smallwood died 6 October 1987 after a brief illness. Smallwood completed medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1958 and decided on anaesthesia as a career, attaining his FFARACS in 1964. The Orton Medal was awarded posthumously.

Inscriptions & Markings

Moulded in relief around perimeter of medal: THE ROBERT ORTON AWARD R.A.C.S. •Handwritten in black ink on reverse: THE ROBERT ORTON MEDAL OF THE FACULTY / OF ANAESTHETISTS, ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE / OF SURGEONS, PRESENTED POSTHUMOUSLY TO / ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD AT THE R.A.C.S. / G.S.M. MAY 7 1989 •Stamped in black ink on reverse: PORT MELBOURNE PRINTS & FRAMING / 276 BAY ST., PORT MELBOURNE 3207 / TELEPHONE No 646 4000 •Etched around the rim of the medal: ROBIN WILLIAM SMALLWOOD OCTOBER 1987

Laryngeal Mask Airway

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Yellow plastic tubing with a pink rubber laryngeal mask attached. There is an additional fine yellow tube threaded through the base of the rubber mask.

Historical information

The Laryngeal Mask Airway was invented in 1983 by British anaesthetist, Archie Brain.

Inscriptions & Markings

Printed in black in along side: #4 LARYNGEAL MASK AUTOCLAVABLE INTAVENT 3:1

Vial, Ketalar

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Three small glass vials with different colour print labels on each containing 10ml Ketalar (Ketamine Hydrochloride).

Historical information

Ketamine is useful for inducing anaesthesia in shocked patients. It is also commonly used in low doses or infusions for the management of chronic pain. It can produce a state of 'dissociative anaesthesia', where patients are pain free, but not necessarily unconscious.

Mask, Spectacle frame

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Metal mask resembling spectacles with round frames and rounded ends of the arms to secure around the ear. There is a tube coming from each round eye frame to end in a curve that sits in the nostril. The other end of this tube has a rubber tube attached which meets in the middle via a metal connector.

Historical information

The use of a catheter for oxygen therapy was introduced by Arbuthnot Lane in 1907. However, its true value can be seen in its use during WWI. Masks were cumbersome and uncomfortable for the wounded and nasal delivery of oxygen was received more easily. The Tudor Edwards' Spectacle-frame was manufactured in London during the 1930s. Dr Penn recorded that it was an inefficient means of oxygen therapy because of the smallness of the nasal tubes.

Bronchial Blocker - Macintosh Leatherdale Left Bronchial Blocker

Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History, Melbourne

Rubber tubing with curved and tapered end for insertion into lung. Three smaller tubes come off the larger end, two of which have small rubber valves attached. The tube appears with a banded effect however, the banding is represents the now disintegrated rubber cuff.

Historical information

This tube is designed for left pneumonectomy (surgical removal of a lung or part of a lung). The left stem bronchus may be completely blocked off, while the right lung is inflated. There is provision for aspiration of the left bronchus.

Inscriptions & Markings

Blue sticker with white writing on side of tube: S.I.6.