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Melbourne Legacy Melbourne , Victoria

Melbourne Legacy is dedicated to caring for families of Australian Defence Force veterans who have lost their lives or health serving their country. At a time when all may seem lost, Legacy is there to help a family of individual through the tough times and restore their confidence in the future.

This collection will serve as an archive of items representing the history of the Legacy Club of Melbourne and the services that have been provided to the families of veterans by Melbourne Legacy from its inception to the present time.

Contact Information

location
GPO Box 4312 Melbourne Vic 3001
phone
+61 (03) 8626 0500

Contact

Location

293 Swanston Street Melbourne Victoria

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1641 items

1641 items

Document - History & purposes of residences

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

3 x Foolscap typed sheets, blue on white.

Historical information

A paper which was delivered to the Legacy in Victoria Conference in 1980, detailing Melbourne Legacy's involvement in housing the children of Legacy widows since 1942. By 1950 Melbourne Legacy administered four houses - Holmbush, Stanhope, Blamey House and Harelands - and cared for approximately 100 children. The houses were designed to be as homely as possible, and each one was largely autonomous. Children, many of whom came from country Victoria, would go to their own homes during school holidays and the Christmas season. The stated objectives were to 'pass out into the world young men and women with high ideals of citizenship, who are self-reliant and self-supporting.' Also 'to provide affection, security and a future goal and essential discipline.' The country Clubs and Groups would send provisions such as preserved fruit, cheese, eggs, honey, citrus fruit, butter, and potatoes throughout the year to support the residences. Numbers of residents declined during the 70s, and in 1975 a Residences Committee recommended that Blamey House and Harelands should be closed, leaving only Stanhope in operation, the first Blamey House having closed in 1955 with Holmbush being renamed the second Blamey House. By 1980 the only remaining house was Stanhope with an average occupancy of 20. See Cat. No. 00785 for a first hand account of being a resident at Stanhope.

Inscriptions & Markings

Some pencilled ticks and bracketing.

Document - Legacy - 73 Years of Constant Caring

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White A4 paper with black type x 2 pages of a media release about Legacy in 1996.

Historical information

A media release providing information about Legacy's first 73 years and to promote Legacy Week and the Badge Appeal. It mentions one of the founders of Legacy, L/ Stan Savige had a philosophy that 'life itself is worthless without some form of service to the community.'

Significance

A record of a media release from February 1996, with an outline of the founding of Legacy, the role of Legatees and information about L/ Stan Savige.

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White A4 photocopy with black type from ILC to Lorna Skinner in 1945 attached to a photocopy of two photos.

Historical information

A letter thanking Miss Lorna Skinner for her work with the Don Esses boys. The photos appear to be an outing of young children and some ILC members or Legatees. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

Record that the ILC had help from Lorna Skinner with the Don Esses boys classes. An example of the ILC letterhead and they used the Legacy logo with a banner saying ILC.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten 'Box 11 Box 5, which was part of an early archive project numbering system. Signed KT Herron.

Document, newspaper article - Salute to a Legacy Veteran

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Newspaper cutting about Miss Enez Domec-Carre in 1988.

Historical information

A newspaper article published in The Sun on 25 March 1988 as Legacy was preparing to celebrate the a Legacy reunion featuring Miss Enez Domec-Carre who was turning 80. Enez was the supervisor of the girls classes held at Legacy House for many years - 38 years according to this article. She organised many annual demonstrations and was held in high regard by Legacy. The library at Legacy House is named in her honour. See also a newspaper article at 00978 which outlines her achievements, a summary of her career at 00458 and 00129. She was a former Miss Victoria and was known for her physical education skills and for introducing grace and culture to Melbourne. In 1932 she joined Melbourne Legacy as assistant to Mrs Gilles (wife of a Legatee) later became the chief instructor of girls' physical education until she retired aged 65. In the post World War II baby boom the Legacy evening classes were attended by about 400 girls. She helped organise Legacy Widows and Legatee wives to sew the costumes for performances. Among her proudest moments was a display by 1000 Junior Legatees at the MCG during the 1954 visit of Queen Elizabeth II. As well her work for Legacy she ran physical education, ballroom dancing and debutante preparation classes.

Significance

A record that Legacy was saluting the hard work of Miss Domec-Carre in 1988.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Club ILC18

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White quarto paper with black type about the ILC, it was paper clipped to items labelled ILC18 in red pen.

Historical information

A one page typed summary of the ILC concerning members. Its as clipped to other documents compiled by L/ Frank Doolan about the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC). It mentions that the main assistance ILC was providing to Legacy was, through the Housing and Accomodation, the Firewood and Christmas Party committees. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the activities of the ILC. The documents were collected by L/ Frank Doolan, who was on the archive committee in the 1970s and started collecting historical information.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen ILC18 which was part of an early archive project numbering system.

Document - The Future of the Intermediate Legacy Club ILC18

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper with black type about the ILC, they were paper clipped to items labelled ILC18 in red pen.

Historical information

Two documents compiled by L/ Frank Doolan about the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC). One is dated 15 February 1947 and examines the options for the ILC future, written by Graham Billiet. The other is a confidential proposal by an unknown person that the ILC could change focus and establish a Country Club Ranch. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the activities of the ILC and discussion of it's future. The documents were collected by L/ Frank Doolan, who was on the archive committee in the 1970s and started collecting historical information.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen ILC18 which was part of an early archive project numbering system. 01637.1 Handwritten in pencil 'Legatee Doolan'. 01637.2 Handwritten in blue ink 'Norm - Confidential'

Document, brochure - Duties of Various Sub-Committees / Intermediate Legacy, Melbourne

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White quarto paper brochure x 3 pages of Legacy committees.

Historical information

A copy of information about Legacy published for members of the Intermediate Legacy Club to understand the Club's activities. The date is unknown. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the Legacy Committees that were active at the time.

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White note paper x 18 pages handwritten by Norm Smith about the ILC members and a handwritten letter x 3 pages from Graham Billiet about ILC members with addresses.

Historical information

A letter written by Norm Smith and addressed to Kem Kemsley on 21 July 1975. It outlines recollections compiled by Norm Smith about the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC) and individual members. His letter mentions 'Looking back over those years, recalling old time, old faces and places, we as Junior Legatees have a lot to be thankful for and I, for one, have always been exceedingly grateful to you, and those like you in legacy, who helped us so much.' Graham Billiet's letter dated 23 Mar 1974, mentions taking Frank Doolan to the reunion in 1974. Graham felt the ILC was winding down and was only running on half steam. He gives ILC members' addresses. Norm Smith's letter includes: Ted Kennedy, was the first president of the ILC, he was 'tall rangy lad with fiery red hair' who worked for United Distillers Ltd for 40 years (mostly in Brisbane where he joined Brisbane Legacy). Had been a keen junior legatee and taken part in Literary and Debating group and the Dramatic group where he met his future wife, Florence Pittard - which was the first marriage between junior legatees. He had been a naval cadet in the 1928 compulsory training and later joined the CMF where he was closely associated with L/ Stan Savige. He rose to rank of Major in AIF. Jack and Tom Kennedy, his brothers were in the Lacrosse team and his sister Molly in the JLC for years. G Billiet, a first nighter, very well known to legatees of the time. Bill Johnston, a studious type, went to MHS and university, became a Solicitor. Served in the RAAF as a Flight Lieut. Frank Corrie, prominent Junior Legatee in the Literary and Debating group, a fitter and turner by trade, was on JLC cricket and lacrosse teams, joined the AIF. Fred Hollingsworth, a motor mechanic, he joined CIG. He joined the AIF and served in the Middle East, and was one of the Rats of Tobruk as a sergeant. Bert Hollingsworth (brother of Fred) also in AIF and rank of Lieut. Is a past president of ILC. Bert Wood, a past president, worked for Victorian Railways, moved to Coolangatta. Dan Fitzgerald, active in the Drama group of JLC, worked as an announcer at the ABC. Alan Davidson, keen gymnast - particularly wrestling, helped with Alan Beattie (instructor of boys classes). Roy Davidson (brother of Alan) joined the AIF, afterwards joined M&MTB as a driver, married a Junior Legacy girl. Their younger brother Arthur was also in the lacrosse team. Roy Gilbert, keen junior legatee took part in Literary and Debating group and the Dramatic group and lacrosse team. Worked for Vacuum Oil Co., a past president of ILC and also married a Junior Legatee, Miss Lil Edmunds. Served in the AIF and was a Lieutenant in the Middle East. 'Jimmy' MacGregor, a colourful and handsome Junior Legatee, born in Collingwood, was one of L/ Stan Savige original contacts. Keen JLC gymnast and member of the football team. Worked at the Ret. Soldiers Woollen Mills in Geelong and was in the Geelong ILC. Frank 'Happy' Holliday, was in the lacrosse team, foundation member of ILC and past president. Served with the RAAF as an air frame fitter. Worked for L/ Con Fahle in the printing workshop for 40 years. Howard Auterey, joined the RAAF during the war and returned work for the State Saving bank before retiring in Warrnambool. Norman Smith, was working as an apprentice with M&MTB, took interest in Literary and Debating group and was in the lacrosse team. Was ILC president in 1946. Enliseted in the RAAF as airframe fitter. Retired from M&MTB after serving 50 years, married for 40 years to a daughter of an original Anzac who has also been an active member of the Ladies ILC for many years. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together (formed under guidance of L/ Jimmy Downing). Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of a Junior Legatee recording what he knew about ILC members and their life outside of Legacy in response to a request from L/ Kem Kemsley. It could have been part of the early archive committee working to capture Legacy history.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Annual Meeting 1942

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Off white A4 photocopy of a notice of the annual meeting of the ILC in 1942.

Historical information

A leaflet from the annual meeting of the ILC in 1942. The evening was for the presentation of the annual report and financial statement plus the installation of office bearers. It was held at the club rooms at 55 Market St, Melbourne. The menu included 'Musso (spaghetti) on toast / Sausages and garden salad / Peaches, jelly and ice cream / Coffee.' It includes a comic drawing of members and humorous characterisation of the members. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of a meeting during the second world war and interesting menu provided.

Document, newsletter - The Interview. Official Organ of the Melbourne Inter Legacy Club

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White quarto paper newsletter x 14 pages of the ILC in 1933, Vol 1 No 1.

Historical information

A copy of a newsletter published by the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC) from 1933. It included news, poetry and president report by Len Frazer. Len was later the first Junior Legatee accepted into Melbourne Legacy after serving in the second world war. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the activities of the ILC from the point of view of L/ Frank Doolan.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Club ILC18

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White note paper of various sizes handwritten by L/ Frank Doolan about the ILC.

Historical information

A set of notes compiled by L/ Frank Doolan about the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC). He spoke at the 1974 reunion and perhaps these notes formed part of his speech. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the activities of the ILC from the point of view of L/ Frank Doolan who was on the archive committee in the 1970s and started collecting historical information.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen ILC18 which was part of an early archive project numbering system. Stamped with 'Frank J Doolan' and his address in grey ink.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Club - Report presented at the Annual General Meeting ILC6

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper reports with black type x 5 reports from 1934 to 1955. 01631.1 1934-35, 7 pages 01631.2 1935-36, 5 pages 01631.3 1939, 6 pages includes financial summary and a copy of the newsletter 01631.4 1950, 6 pages includes financial summary 01631.5 1955, 7 pages includes financial summary

Historical information

Annual reports of the Intermediate Legacy Club over several years. They include interesting information about the activities the ILC were involved in and some include some financial information. The ILC was self sufficient and did not receive funds from Legacy. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of the activities of the ILC.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen ILC6 which was part of an early archive project numbering system.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Club - Historic Reunion

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper with black type x 2 pages of part of a newsletter in 1974.

Historical information

A reprint from a Legacy Newsletter on 26/2/1974 about a reunion of Intermediate Legacy Club. It was a mix of Melbourne ILC and Geelong ILC members. Some Legatees attended as well, including Frank Doolan who spoke, plus Kem Kemsley and Jim Gillespie. Intermediate Legatee Jim McGregor was one of Stan Savige's first Junior Legatee Contact, and was very close to L/ Savige. It was one of the last meetings of the ILC as it ceased operations in 1974. The residue of funds held by the club were transferred to the Sir Stanley Savige Memorial Trust No 2. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

A record of where the ILC members served in world war two. The ILC was active from 1929 to 1974.

Document - Members of the Melbourne Intermediate Legacy Club who served in the Defence Services 1939-1945

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White lined note paper with handwritten list of members who served in World War 2.

Historical information

A list of 22 members of the ILC who had served in the second world war and their details if known. A second note mentions that of 42 ILC members, there were 33 that served in the second world war. 12 in the AIF, 12 in the AMF, 8 in the RAAF, and 1 in the Indian Army. The balance were in reserved occupations or had ill health. Ranks held included 2 Majors, 2 Captains, 2 Lieutenants, and 1 pilot officer. Also noted was that 2 became POWs and one in the RAAF served in the No 10 Squadron. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee. List included: Edward Kennedy Graham Billiet, Cecil Waters, Len Frazer, Jack Suggett, Bert Hollingsworth, Jack Belsey, Frank Bell, Norman Smith, Ron Rimmer, Bill (Spud) Murphy, Jim Day, Don Cameron, Bill Johnston, Frank 'Happy' Holliday, Alan Williams, Doug Wade, Jack Rintoul, Bill Stanbridge, Alan Francis, Chris Jorgenson

Significance

A record of where the ILC members served in world war two and some of the ranks they attained. The ILC was active from 1929 to 1974.

Document - Intermediate Legacy Club. Application for Membership

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap application form with black type for membership of the ILC.

Historical information

A form for application for membership to the ILC. It shows the declaration required by the nominator and candidate. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

An example of the formality of membership required to be part of the Intermediate Legacy Club. The ILC was active from 1929 to 1974.

Document - ILC Members who have occupied the presidential chair. ILC5

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper with black type of a list of Presidents of the ILC.

Historical information

A list of the presidents of the Intermediate Legacy Club and the dates of tenure. The list might be incomplete as it stops at 1964. The first president was Legatee EM Kennedy from 15th March 1929. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

An important list of the final members of the Intermediate Legacy Club. The ILC was active from 1930 to 1974.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen 'ILC5' which was part of the an early archive numbering system.

Document - List of Members of Intermediate Legacy Club when it Ceased Operations on 20/2/1974. ILC4

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper with black type of a list of 40 members of the ILC in 1974.

Historical information

A list of the 40 final members of the Intermediate Legacy Club when it ceased operating in 1974. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929 (or 1930 according to the newsletter article). The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee. Names on the list were: HA Ackerley, JW Alsope (dec), KG Bartils, JWL Belsey, E Brown (dec), JW Bush, J Coade, R Cumming, J Ferguson, CC Fisher, WJ Gilmore (dec), EJD Graham (dec), RE Harding, KA Hatherly, AT Henderson, KT Herron, JW Hocking, Frank C Holliday, JA Holloway, Fred Hollingsworth, HA Hollingsworth, C Jorgensen, C Julian (dec), KS King, G Lake, AV Lawson (dec), JV Lawson, Jimmy M MacGregor, CL MacMillan, A McNaughton (dec), W McNaughton, HG Metcalfe, WG Needham (dec), JE Pilbeam, RC Rickards, RHW Rimmer (dec), Norman A Smith, JM Suggett, GE Todd, BF Wood.

Significance

An important list of the final members of the Intermediate Legacy Club. The ILC was active from 1930 to 1974.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in red pen 'ILC4' which was part of the an early archive numbering system.

Document - ILC Foundation Members when the Club Commenced in March 1929. ILC3

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White A4 paper with black type of a list of 18 foundation members of the ILC.

Historical information

A list of the foundation members of the Intermediate Legacy Club from March 1929. They were: Graham F Billet, Frank C Corrie, Alan Davidson, Roy Davidson, Dan Fitzgerald, Len Frazer, Roy Gilbert, Frank C Holliday, Fred Hollingsworth, EM (Ted) Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, AV Lawson, JV Lawson, Jimmy Macgregor, R Rimmer, Norman A Smith, R Warnecke, Bert S Wood. (Bill Johnston was also mentioned in a letter by Norm Smith as a 'first nighter' see item at 01635). Background: The ILC was formed in 1929 with a total membership of 18 according to this list. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

An important list of the initial members of the Intermediate Legacy Club. The ILC was active from 1930 to 1974.

Document - Rules and Objects. Intermediate Legacy Club

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White foolscap paper with black type x 4 pages of Rules of the Intermediate Legacy Club.

Historical information

A document outlining the rules and objectives of the Intermediate Legacy Club (ILC). Background: The ILC was formed in 1929 with a total membership of 18. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. Was in a folder of material collated about the ILC by an early archive committee.

Significance

An important summary of the objectives and work of the Intermediate Legacy Club. The ILC was active from 1929 to 1974.

Document, newsletter - Intermediate Legacy Club

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

One page of a newsletter explaining the formation and role of the Intermediate Legacy Club.

Historical information

A summary about the Intermediate Legacy Club included in the Legacy Newsletter on 2 August 1949 for the information of Legacy members. The article mentions: The ILC was formed in 1930 (actually 1929) with a total membership of 16 (18 names identified in 01622). The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy.

Significance

An important summary of the formation and work of the Intermediate Legacy Club up to 1949. The ILC was active from 1929 to 1974.

Photo - Foundation-Members of Intermediate Legacy Club ILC 1

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Black and white photo of 14 foundation members of the Intermediate Legacy Club and a paper label, plus a letter and a note with the names of the members.

Historical information

A photo of 14 the original team of men that started the I.L.C. (Intermediate Legacy Club). It was probably taken about 1930 just after the ILC was formed. The accompanying letter dated 30/11/1983 and note shows the photo was sent to Legacy by Harold Bokes and given to Legatee Frank Doolan of the archive committee for the archives on 7/12/1983. The note in Frank's handwriting shows he had identified all the members in the photo and that it had been taken by John Barnes. Back row: R. Rimmer, Dan Fitzgerald, Ted Kennedy, J Lawson, R Davidson, Frank Holliday, A Warnecke. Front row: Norman Smith, Roy Gilbert, Frank Corrie, E Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, A Lawson, Len Frazer. Absent: Jimmy MacGregor, Alan Davidson, Fred Hollingsworth, Bert Woods. Background: The ILC was formed in 1929 with a total membership of 18. The idea of the club sprang from those boys who had outgrown the Junior Legacy Club. In the early days it fielded a lacrosse team and it was this that mainly held the members together. Enthusiasm wained after a few years as it lacked a solid objective. The answer came from one of its members and in 1938 they founded the Don Esses Club. This was a club for the children of incapacitated ex-servicemen which met every Thursday night at 7.30 run by the ILC members. The name came from the signallers' code Disabled Servicemen's Sons. During the second world war 80% of the members of the ILC enlisted in the services. Leaving only 8 members that could not join due to ill health or reserved occupations. They continued the Don Esses and whatever aid they could to Legacy. ILC members had always helped Legacy where possible including being camp leaders or camp staff, with the annual demonstrations, and coffee stalls at the ANZAC dawn service. Post second world war some ILC members were nominated into Legacy, others drifted away in civil occupations. It was found difficult to recruit new blood into the ILC and eventually membership waned when the boys from the Don Esses clubs found other youth activities to join. The ILC ceased to meet regularly in the mid fifties. However a strong comradeship still existed between members and they would meet in one anothers homes. Members were always ready to help the senior Legacy Club in any way in their power and still helped at Christmas parties and summer camps. ILC was a service rendering organisation and was self governing. Non-sectarian and non-political, the members were ex-junior legatees over 18 years of age. After serving in World War 2 members were eligible to become members of Legacy. The accompanying letter dated 30/11/1983 and note shows the photo was sent to Legacy by Harold Bokes and given to Legatee Frank Doolan of the archive committee for the archives on 7/12/1983. The note in Frank's handwriting shows he had identified all the members in the photo and that it had been taken by John Barnes. Back row: R. Rummell, D Fitzgerald, T Kennedy, J Lawson, R Davidson, F Holliday, A Warnecke. Front row: N Smith, R Gilbert, F Corrie, E Kennedy, J Kennedy, A Lawson, L Frazer. Absent: J MacGregor, A Davidson, F Hollingsworth, B Woods.

Significance

An early photo of junior Legatees who had formed the Intermediate Legacy Club in 1930.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten label says 'Foundation-Members of Intermediate Legacy Club'. Handwritten letter is from when it was sent to Legacy by Harold Bokes and is marked 'ILC1' in red pen as part of the early archive numbering system.

Photo, Ceremony at the Shrine

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Black and white photo of an Anzac Commemoration Ceremony for students at the Shrine.

Historical information

A Legacy ceremony at the Shrine of Remembrance in 1988. One of the annual "Anzac Commemoration Ceremony for Students" events, held just prior to ANZAC Day. The ceremony provides a valuable opportunity for students to gain an appreciation of the Anzac spirit, the significance of the Shrine and the meaning of Anzac Day. It is a photo of school children on the forecourt of the Shrine before the service. It was provided by Terry Walsh the executive officer.

Significance

A record of a ceremony for school students at the Shrine.

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten in blue ink on the reverse '57th Annual School Children's Commemoration Service at the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne. Fri, 22nd April 1988. Beautiful, fine and sunny day. Excellences attendance ~2000 children. "The crowd assembles" Terry Walsh xo'

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Off-white foolscap photocopy of letter sent to Legatee R.J.A. Fofkett by Miss Enez Domec-Carre

Historical information

Letter sent to Legatee R.J.A. Foskett by Miss Enez Domec-Carre discontinuing the use of Legacy House for her private physical culture classes.

Significance

The letter illustrates Miss Carre's loyalty to Legacy and discontinues her private classes at Legacy House.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in purple "COPY ONLY"

Document script

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Off-white photocopy of typed speech by W.V. Scott. 3 pages.

Historical information

A narrative of Miss Enez Domec-Carre's work with Melbourne Legacy. Appears to be text of a speech made on her retirement.

Significance

Description of the contribution to the work of Melbourne Legacy by Miss Carre with Girls' Classes and in other areas.

Inscriptions & Markings

Top right corner of page one "1970" handwritten in blue pen. "W.V. Scott" handwritten in blue pen following text on page three.

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Off-white quarto photocopy of letter sent to Legatee D.J. Simonson by Miss Enez Domec-Carre

Historical information

Letter sent to Legatee D.J. Simonson by Miss Enez Domec-Carre thanking Melbourne Legacy for allowing her to continue to conduct her private physical culture classes at Legacy House rent free and also for granting her $20 per week after her retirement until she became eligible for the Age Pension. She also expresses her loyalty to Legacy and offers assistance at any time.

Significance

The letter illustrates Miss Carre's loyalty to Legacy and Legacy's appreciation of her service.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in purple "CONFIDENTIAL". "COPY TO .... FOR INFORMATION ONLY" and blue handwriting "Executive Officer"

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Off-white foolscap paper photocopy of a typed letter from Enez Domec-Carre to Legatee J.M.L. Clarke

Historical information

Photocopy of a typed letter from Enez Domec-Carre to Legatee J.M.L. Clarke, Chairman of Girls' Classes Committee, tendering her resignation effective from 31st December 1970.

Significance

Resignation of Miss Enez Domec-Carre as Chief Instructress of Legacy Girls' Classes after having served Legacy for 36 years.

Inscriptions & Markings

Stamped in purple "CONFIDENTIAL". "COPY TO .... FOR INFORMATION ONLY" and blue handwriting "Executive Officer"

Document, letter

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

White quarto paper carbon copy, a letter x 2 pages to Enez Domec-Carre

Historical information

A letter of appointment to Miss Enez Domec-Carre outlining duties and remuneration for Chief Instructress of all Melbourne Legacy Girls' Group Classes

Significance

A record of the appointment and duties of Miss Enez Domec-Carre as Chief Instructress of Legacy Girls' Classes

Inscriptions & Markings

Handwritten "Girls classes 1-1-59" Stamped "COPY ONLY" and "PLEASE RETURN THIS CORRESPONDENCE TO EXECUTIVE OFFICER"

Photo

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Colour photo x 7 of a presidents' lunch.

Historical information

Photos of a gathering of past presidents of Legacy at Legacy House. It is possibly 1991 as L/ John Sullivan is in attendance. The photos were in a scrapbook of photos from 1983 to 1991.

Significance

A record of the surviving past presidents at a luncheon. It shows that the previous presidents were still active in Legacy after their tenure finished and remained in contact with each other.

Photo

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Colour photo x 6 of a social event for Legacy widows in 1992 and a yellow paper label.

Historical information

Photos of a garden party at the home of Val Dyke on 26 January 1992. It was a social event for widows which shows the comradeship between the widows. Names are not known. Photos were in a photo album from the early 1990s.

Significance

A record of the type of activities Legacy provided as a social outlet for widows

Photo

Melbourne Legacy, Melbourne

Colour photo x 4 of the induction of the Yarra Valley's new president in 1989.

Historical information

Photos of a dinner to welcome the new president of the Yarra Valley Legacy Club's new president in 1989. Melbourne Legacy President Chas Wilks attended the induction (in the grey suit). Other names are not known.

Significance

Representatives from Melbourne Legacy attended the important events of other Legacy clubs.