Stories Organisations Projects About Login

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry Melbourne, Victoria

We have a significant Chemistry Cultural Collection dating back to mid 19th century and is one of the more comprehensive academic chemistry collections world-wide. See http://museum.chemistry.unimelb.edu.au

Links

Contact Information

location
School of Chemistry University of Melbourne Melbourne VIC 3010
phone
+61 8344 6567

Contact

Opening Hours

By appointment

Entry Fee

free

Location

University of Melbourne Melbourne Victoria

The School of Chemistry at the University of Melbourne has an extensive cultural heritage collection of over 300 items. These items are associated with the first century of teaching and research in Chemistry at the University, from the 1850s to the 1960s.

Significance

The University of Melbourne's Chemistry Collection comprises more than 300 items, dating from the 1850s to the 1960s. These interpret the first century of teaching and research in chemistry at the University.

The collection includes bottles of chemicals, balances, glassware, burners, apparatus for measurement and investigation of gases, paper-based materials, photographic film, slides, catalogues and lecture notes. Many of the items are of historical significance due to their association with key figures in the history of chemistry and science at the University of Melbourne, in Australia, and internationally.

That we can study this collection today is due largely to the efforts of Dr Joan Radford, a member of the School of Chemistry from 1956 to 1980. She described and documented the objects, their uses and associations, and in 1980 organised for the collection to be placed on long-term loan with the Science Museum of Victoria, now part of Museum Victoria. After 27 years the Collection was returned to the University and has been in the care of the University of Melbourne Archives.

There are no comments yet.

Leave a comment

403 items

403 items

Price List

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Presliste 1925' Published by Greiner and Friedricks. G.m.b.H. Stuetzgerbach I - Th (1926)

Prism

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Prism - for equipment not identified in wooden box

Leaflet

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Hanova Price List

Manual

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Zeiss Lamp, casing and stand manual

Pipette �

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Pipette, calibrated, 20.00ml, belonged to G.Ampt

Gold Salt

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Diethylene Sulphide Methyl Sulphine Iodide

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Gas Regulators

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Two Gas regulators.

Combustion Apparatus

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Pieces of apparatus to demonstrate combustion of one gas in another

Gold Assay Balance

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Gold Assay Balance, almost certainly Kirkland's own.

Historical information

Born in Ireland, John Drummond Kirkland trained as a chemical analyst through apprenticeship in a medical laboratory in Dublin, before migrating to Australia in 1852 and moving to Melbourne in 1855. While still an undergraduate medical student at the University of Melbourne, he was appointed lecturer in chemistry following the sudden death of John Macadam in 1865. Due to the enthusiastic support of his fellow students this temporary role became a permanent appointment the following year. Kirkland continued his studies, graduating in medicine in 1873 and surgery in 1880. His son, John Booth Kirkland, was appointed as his assistant in 1878, later leading to accusations of nepotism. In 1882 John Drummond Kirkland became the University?s first professor of chemistry and metallurgy, continuing until his death in 1885. Today?s researchers use a high performance computing facility named ?Kirkland? after the first Professor of Chemistry at the University of Melbourne. Chemistry was still controlled by the medical school during Kirkland?s career, but became part of the science degree from 1886, along with the appointment of David Orme Masson as professor. Kirkland struggled for University funding to buy new apparatus. To compensate, he bought much from his own personal funds, including analytical chemistry equipment. Chemistry was first taught at Melbourne in the medical school, located in the area now occupied by Physics and the Ian Potter Museum of Art.

Oscillator

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Historical information

Oscillator, probably used by Heyman and his students in help he gave Hartung

Optical Glass

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Optical glass

Historical information

Stages in development of optical glass. Very early experiments by E.J. Hartung. Ernst Johannes Hartung was a chemist and astronomer. Educated at the University of Melbourne (BSc 1913, DSc 1919), he became lecturer in 1919, associate professor in 1924, and succeeded Rivett as chair of chemistry in 1928, remaining in this position until 1953. Hartung?s lecturing style surged with enthusiasm and he employed the use of screen projections to demonstrate chemical phenomena to large undergraduate classes. In 1935 he recorded Brownian movement in colloidal solutions on 35 mm cinefilm, which was later copied onto 16 mm film for the Eastman Kodak Co. World Science Library. This can be viewed in the Chemistry laboratory. He researched the photo decomposition of silver halides, and was awarded the David Syme Prize in 1926. He devoted time to the design and construction of a large, new chemistry building for the School of Chemistry (built 1938?1939). During World War II he was approached by Professor Thomas Laby, chairman of the Optical Munitions Panel, to chair the advisory committee on optical materials, to produce high quality optical glass in Australia. This was successful, with large-scale production achieved within ten months at a reasonable cost. Hartung served three terms as general President of the (Royal) Australian Chemical Institute, was an ex-officio councillor of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, and a Trustee of the Museum of Applied Science (now part of Museum Victoria).

Globe

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

b. Globe for Reciprocal Nature of Combustion, Expt. 17.

Vacuum Tube

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Crooke's Vacuum tube

Weston Cells

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Two Weston Cells, H.Tinsley & Co London

Glass Washing Bottles

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Demonstration Equipment

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Photometer Cells

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Number of parts: 25.

Galvanometer

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Galvanometer, Cambridge Instrument Co, England, Serial No 944.

Discharge Tubes

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Set of rare gases in a box coming from Irvine Masson to his father.

Historical information

(Sir) David Orme Masson was Professor of Chemistry at the University of Melbourne from 1886 to1923. As well as being a distinguished teacher and researcher, he contributed significantly to Australian scientific and public life, being instrumental in the establishment and governance of many important bodies including the CSIRO. Masson supported Antarctic research for 25 years, beginning with Douglas Mawson?s expedition of 1911. Born in England and receiving an MA, BSc and DSc from the University of Edinburgh, he was a gifted, elegant and disciplined lecturer and a researcher of substance. His research work included the theory of solutions, from which emerged the term ?critical solution temperature?; the periodic classification of the elements; and the velocity of migration of ions in solutions. Much of his research was done in collaboration with talented students such as David Rivett and his own son Irvine Masson. Masson was knighted in 1923. He is commemorated by the Masson Theatre and Masson Road at the University of Melbourne; a mountain range and island in Antarctica; a portrait painting by William McInnes in the foyer of the School of Chemistry; the Masson lectureship from the Australian National Research Council; and the Masson memorial scholarship from the Royal Australian Chemical Institute.

Neodymium-Rich Hydroxides

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

label refers to Dr.Anderson possibly related to CH 158

Eudiometer

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Conductance Cell

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Historical information

Conductance Cell, student type.

Trimethyl Sulphine Dichlor-Iodide

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Earliest research samples from David Orme Masson's work at Edinburgh.Trimethyl sulphine dichloride, crystallised rom cold alcohol.

Handbooks

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Historical information

Handbooks and Catalogues for Lecture Projection Apparatus

Torches

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Glass blower's torches. For age, see Gall Cat.No 1020 for "Oxygen" type.

Cobalt Potassium Sulphate

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Zinc K Sulphate Over Nickel Potassium Sulphate

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Gas Sample

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

a. An early sample of H2S - perhaps spectroscopically pure.

Burette �

University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Melbourne

Burette with tap, calibrated, 50.00ml, belonged to G.Ampt