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Victorian Collections -

Talking Shop: Ballarat in Business and City Life at Ballaarat Mechanics' Institute

27 Jun 2019

Curated By

Amy Tsilemanis, Curator, Ballaarat Mechanics' Institute

62 items with audio

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62 items

1985 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'The History Show' broadcast about nurses in World War I featuring historian Katie Holmes

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

29 minute audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'The History Show' on 3CR Community Radio. Features feminist historian Katie Holmes speaking on the experience of nurses in World War I.

Sound Recording - City of Kew 1860-1960: Centenary Addresses / by The Right Hon RG Menzies & Cr WHS Dickinson, 1960

Kew Historical Society Inc, Kew

City of Kew Centenary 1860-1960 Speeches by The Hon RG Menzies, MHR for Kew, and Cr WHS Dickinson, Mayor of Kew. Recorded on 13th December 1960 at the Kew City Hall 34 minutes 29 seconds From the archives of the Kew Historical Society Inc Copyright Kew Historical Society Inc Timings 00.14-17.00 The Right Hon RG Menzies MHR 17.07-32.33 Cr. WHS Dickinson 32.38-33.10 The Right Hon RG Menzies MHR 33.30-33.50 Cr. WHS Dickinson 33.51-34.25 Song - 'For He's a Jolly Good Fellow'

Historical information

The Centenary commemoration of the City of Kew was held in the new Kew City Hall, and attended by invited guests, including the Australian Prime Minister, The Right Hon. RG Menzies, MHR for Kew; Arthur Rylah; and the Mayor, Cr WHS Dickinson.

Significance

This reel-to-reel tape, now digitised, is both rare (ie unique) and historically significant. While the recording clearly has local significance, it is also of national and international significance due to the content of the Prime Minister's address. The focus of his speech is the nature of Australian democracy and its strengths, deriving from universal suffrage and the acceptance of democratic values by the Australian population, gained through historic participation in democracy at local, state and federal levels. RG Menzies mounts a strong case for each level of government having value in the development of Australian democracy. He also describes the emerging democracies of Africa in the period following decolonisation, and suggests that the success of these countries is dependent on democratic institutions not being imposed from above by colonial powers.

Inscriptions & Markings

Label on original box

Oral History_Williamstown Botanic Gardens_Ken Speakman

Williamstown Botanic Gardens- Hobsons Bay City Council, Williamstown

CD and transcript of interview with Ken Speakman. Also present was his daughter, Nola Wilson. His son visited part of the way through the interview. Ken’s family moved to Williamstown in 1918 when he was a baby and he has lived in Williamstown, close to the Gardens since that time. He was a keen lacrosse player, playing on Fearon Reserve. Ken was interviewed for his memories of the Gardens and its relationship to Fearon Reserve.

Historical information

The interview is one of a series recorded in 2013-2014 to document memories and experiences of the Williamstown Botanic Gardens, surrounding areas and Fearon Reserve

Significance

A primary source of information on memories of the Gardens and witness to changes in the Gardens over those years.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Album - Maldon Brass Band - Live in Concert 2006

Maldon Brass Band Inc., Maldon

Oral history interview - Justin Tilson

Wangaratta RSL Sub Branch, Wangaratta

This digital oral history interview was conducted at Wangaratta RSL Sub Branch on May 29, 2018 as part of the Veterans Heritage Project.

Historical information

Justin Tilson served in Australia and overseas at places including Papua New Guinea and Iraq in the Air Force. In his interview he discusses his enlistment, training and service, as well as his demobilisation.

Talking Shop Stories from Ballarat women

Ballaarat Mechanics' Institute (BMI Ballarat), Ballarat

Audio file. Edited from oral histories collected at Talking Shop exhibition Community Day March 2019, featuring the voices of Heather Horrocks, Shirley Whitefield, and Isabel Gribble

Historical information

These oral histories were collected at a Talking Shop Community Day, March 2019, where the community was invited to come and share their memories on local shops and businesses. This edited piece was created for International Womens Day and features the voices of Heather Horrocks (speaking about the haberdashery business Picot and Widmer and the controversial McDonald's established on Bakery Hill in the 1970s), Shirley Whitefield (speaking about Ballarat tram and shop memories and playing local football in the 1960s), and Isabel Gribble (recalling visits to local shops and hotels). These snippets capture some of the varied and spirited lives of Ballarat women.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Men's Soccer Jersey

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Men's navy blue and white soccer jersey, with white collar and inscriptions. Has Thessaloniki logo across the chest and in white writing, S.S.I. logo, and Pronto Refrigeration logo of same name sponsor. S.S.I. manufacturer logo also on white collar. Polyester material and part "A" of a two piece uniform.

Historical information

Full uniform used by Thessaloniki Association's soccer team in a tournament organised as part of "Dimitria" celebrations in soccer matches, outdoor and indoor.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in indoor and outdoor soccer matches

Inscriptions & Markings

Thessaloniki, S.S.I., Pronto Refrigeration

Sound recording - Karen Knight - move to Cooparoo

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 wmv file

Historical information

Karen Knight, Regional Manager for QLD/NT for Independent Living Services at Vision Australia, talks about she became blind and her journey through life including the move to the new office at Cooparoo.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Sound recording - Jenny Scown - move to Cooparoo

Vision Australia, Kooyong

1 wmv file

Historical information

Jenny Scown, team leader at Business Enterprises at Cooparoo, talks about she became blind and her journey through life including the move to the new office at Cooparoo.

Oral History_Williamstown Botanic Gardens_Chic Wyatt (nee Anderson)

Williamstown Botanic Gardens- Hobsons Bay City Council, Williamstown

CD and transcript of interview with Chic Wyatt (nee Anderson) and her memories of the Gardens from her childhood through to adulthood. The purpose of the interview is to discuss a collection of photos she lent to the Gardens for copying (registration no. 2013.001) and to recall memories of her Father, Ernie Anderson and of living in the grounds.

Historical information

The interview is one of a series recorded in 2013-2014 to document memories and experiences of the Williamstown Botanic Gardens

Significance

A primary source of information on memories of the Gardens. Chic is the daughter of Ernie Anderson who worked at the Gardens from the age of 15 until he retired at 65. Ernie’s full name was Ernest Rupert Cyril Anderson. Chic verified from her Mother’s bible that her Father was born 19th June 1895. The Anderson family moved into the Curator’s Lodge in the grounds of the Gardens in 1938 following the death of the previous Curator, William Joseph Crowe.

Polydor 78rpm record - Tales from the Vienna Wood

Williamstown High School , Williamstown

78 rpm recording of the Williamstown High School choir singing 'Tales from the Vienna Wood.' Also includes an mp3 version.

Inscriptions & Markings

See images above: Image 78.1.jpg - On A side of record:'Tales from the Vienna Wood' The Williamstown High School Choir. Image 78.2.jpg - On B side of record: 'Melodies of Schubert' The Williamstown High School Choir.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1987 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio, featuring audio recording of a members mass meeting at the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre. Historical information on program taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Smash and Grab' broadcast featuring nurses and guests discussing Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Three audio files (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'Smash and Grab' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Oral History - Senior Sergeant Myrene Purcell

Victoria Police Museum, Docklands

Digital archive of oral history of former Senior Sergeant Myrene Purcell. Cut for exhibition purposes.

Historical information

Myrene Purcell is a retired Detective and Senior Sergeant with Victoria Police. In 1975 she applied for a transfer to the Criminal Investigation Branch and later trained at the Detective Training School.She was a member of the Sexual Offences Squad, which was the first squad of female officers and detectives, who were to investigate rapes and sexual offences in Victoria. In this interview, Purcell discusses her training, career and experiences of discrimination.

Vinyl record - To Israel With Love, 1982

Bialik College, Hawthorn East 3123

Historical information

'To Israel With Love' recorded by the Bialik College Choir, 1982. See image of cover for more details. Scroll past the images above to play mp3 files from the record. Please contact [email protected] to request access to this record.

Compact disc - Interviews with Bill Cecil, Tom Skals and Jean Luxford.

Greensborough Historical Society, Lower Plenty

1 compact disk with audio files Links: 00474:00709:01272

Historical information

Contains interviews with long time Greensborough district residents, Jean Luxford, Bill Cecil and Tom Skals. CD also contains a file of articles on the Santon family.

Significance

Oral history recordings, not transcribed.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Interviews with Tom Skals, Jean Luxford and Bill Cecil"

Oral history interview - Peter Cardwell

Wangaratta RSL Sub Branch, Wangaratta

This digital oral history interview was conducted at Wangaratta RSL Sub Branch on March 21, 2018 as part of the Veterans Heritage Project

Historical information

.

Trireme Replica - Paralos

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Wooden replica model ship that is an exact replica of the ancient Athenian trireme making it unique in the world since there's no other such replica made. Great care was exercised to ensure that it will include all functionality and detail of the ancient ship used to by the Athenians to fight in the Sea battle of Salamis and beyond. Mr Denis Paraskevatos constructed the Paralos Trireme over a period of eighteen months. Mr Paraskevatos relayed the history of his Trireme. The first Trireme was constructed in Greece by the shipbuilder Aminoklis in 704BC, originating from Corinth. The first four Triremes he constructed were ordered by a Poliykrates from Samos, thus the ships were known as Samines. Poliykrates realised he would be able to use the Triremes for his own benefit against invading pirates, as well as to engage in activities of piracy himself. The Athenians built 200 Triremes for the battle of Salamis, all constructed over a period of eighteen months. This was a huge feat, on average a new ship was build every second day. Triremes were primarily used in sea battles, however there were two unique Triremes, the Salaminia and the Paralos, which were considered Holy and only used for Ambassadors and Consulates on overseas trips. Mr Paraskevatos’ Trireme is the Paralos. The term Paralos derives from the Greek social class from the shores, or the merchant classes. Greece was divided into three basic social classes. The mountain region, the plateaus or fields bound to agriculture, and those from the shores. Paralia translates to from the shore. The Paralia were an important class in influencing the democracy. They were divergent group who would deliberately vote on the contrary to everyone else. This is how the Trireme was born. Every Trireme held between 20-50 soldiers, and either 170 or 174 oarsmen. Mr Paraskevatos’ Trireme is a 174 oarsmen ship. The role of the oarsmen was difficult and specialised. When engaged in sea battle and the wind was not enough, the navy would remove the masts and leave them on shore and solely use the oarsmen, leaving the deck clear. However when there were sufficient winds and both the sails and oars were in use the oarsmen had to show great skill in manoeuvrability. When the oarsmen were not needed to manoeuvre the ship they also engaged in battle.

Historical information

The name Trireme comes from its distinct three rows of oars/oarsmen. The first tier of rowers were known as the Thranites, translating to Thrones. They were the most prestigious, and worked the hardest because their oars were furthest away from the water and therefore had to work harder. They were usually younger and they were paid one and a half drachma per day, half a drachma more than the other two tiers of rowers who were paid one drachma per day. After a few years working as Thranites, each was moved down into the second tier, the Zygites. Zygites derives from the word balance, as the second tier was balanced in the middle. After more years again, oarsmen were moved down into the third and final tier, known as the Thalamites. The Thalamites were consistently wet due to the proximity of their tier to the water. The water would leak through the gaps where the oars entered the ships despite the leather skins used to close the openings.

Significance

This is a unique specimen made by D. Paraskevatos, in that it is the only one of its kind in the world that has been built to the exact specifications of the Athenian vessel. It was built in Melbourne and it also has historic and artistic value

Boy's Costume Jacket - Παιδική στολή τσιολιά

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

This is a jacket for boys that is worn as part of the six piece traditional costume. It is navy blue in color and has gold and silver embroidery along the edges. It has silver buttons and a silky orange lining

Historical information

This is part of a contemporary traditional costume worn by males in parades and theatre productions these days, however worn by soldiers in battle during war times in Greece in the 18th - 19th century

Oral History_Williamstown Botanic Gardens_Michael Wilkins

Williamstown Botanic Gardens- Hobsons Bay City Council, Williamstown

CD and transcript of interview with Michael Wilkins. Michael first worked in the Gardens for the Municipality of Williamstown in 1987. He was there for eleven years. A few years after the amalgamation of Williamstown and Altona into the City of Hobsons Bay City Council he transferred from the Gardens to other sites within the City. He returned to the Gardens in 2006. Michael recalls people with whom he worked and horticultural practices over those years.

Historical information

The interview is one of a series recorded in 2013-2014 to document memories and experiences of the Williamstown Botanic Gardens

Significance

A primary source of information on memories of the Gardens and witness to changes in the Gardens over those years.

Oral History - Chief Inspector Bryan Kelly

Victoria Police Museum, Docklands

Digital archive of oral history of former Chief Inspector Bryan Kelly. Cut for exhibition purposes.

Historical information

Bryan Kelly is a former Chief Inspector at Victoria Police, and former president of the Victoria Police Legacy. In 1980 he was awarded the Queens Police Medal for dedication to the welfare of police families. Kelly was involved in the appointment of some of the first police women to stations outside the CBD, including Springvale. In this interview, Kelly discusses the role he played in employing more police women and reminisces about police women's experiences in the 1970s.

Oral History_Williamstown Botanic Gardens_Anne Cocks

Williamstown Botanic Gardens- Hobsons Bay City Council, Williamstown

CD and transcript of interview with Anne Cocks and her memories of the Gardens from her childhood through to adulthood. Anne’s family migrated from Holland in 1952 when she was three years old. The family lived in Lyons Street for a short while before moving to Altona. Her parents, Kees and Betts Huisman bought the Old Royal Hotel in Nelson Place, which was a boarding house for men in 1958. They stayed there until 1971 when they sold it.

Historical information

The interview is one of a series recorded in 2013-2014 to document memories and experiences of the Williamstown Botanic Gardens

Significance

A primary source of information on memories of the Gardens. Anne moved to Williamstown as a small child in 1952, lived in Williamstown until her marriage and has been witness to changes in the Gardens over those years.

Oral history - Sergeant Eileen Rainford

Victoria Police Museum, Docklands

Digital archive of oral history of former police woman Eileen Rainford. Cut for exhibition purposes

Historical information

Eileen Rainford is a retired Sergeant who joined Victoria Police as one of only eight police women in 1952. Born in England, she served with Liverpool police, patrolling the docks, prior to moving to Australia. Speaking numerous languages, including Polish and German, Rainford worked as a translator and radio broadcaster during and after the second world war. On moving to Australia Rainford joined Victoria Police, where as one of only eight policewomen, she noted a major difference in public attitude towards women working in the force. In this interview, Rainford reflects on these different attitudes and her roles at numerous stations.