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Federation University Australia Art Collection Victoria

The Federation University Australia Art Collection aims to develop and maintain an important public art collection of high quality works of visual art which contributes to the intellectual and cultural enrichment of its student body, staff and wider community. The collection enhances the physical environment by adding colour and liveliness to the University and is displayed throughout our Ballarat, Gippsland (Churchill), Stawell and Horsham campuses. The Art Collection provides a valuable educational and research experience, as well as a providing potential to mentor.

The earliest works in the collection are associated with the Ballarat Technical Art School, although a coordinated approach to collecting was initiated by the Ballarat Teachers' College. Collection has continued over the decades, and has benefitted by generous gifts under the Cultural Gifts Program.

The collection covers most periods of Australian Art, and while most media is found it in the collection, it is predominantly Australian painting, printmaking and sculpture. Works by renowned Australian artists feature, as well as staff and students associated with Federation University Australia or its predecessor institutions.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 663 Ballarat Victoria 3353 (map)
phone
+61 (03) 5327 9168

Contact

Opening Hours

By appointment.

Entry Fee

Free entry.

Location

Artworks are displayed at Federation University Australia campuses at Ballarat, Gippsland (Churchill), Stawell and Horsham. Victoria

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Clare K. Gervasoni 8 July 2014 1:15 PM

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monica 4 April 2017 4:31 PM

what do the colours mean in the painting phillip adams

Clare K. Gervasoni 4 April 2017 4:41 PM

Good afternoon Monica. We were no provided with information on the colours used, and alas, the artist is dead. Kind regards Clare Gervasoni Curator: Arts and Historical Collections

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15 items with documents

15 items

Artwork - Painting - 'The Tapestry' by Leonard French

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

A four panel mural by Leonard French, commissioned and gifted by the Ballarat Teachers' College Student in 1959. Artist Leonard French said of this work:- "The centre panel suggests a tree of knowledge growing out of a jewelled fish (a spiritual accompaniment is intended), and from the tree birds rise, spreading out through the cloud shapes of the other panels. Hands and figures rise from the earth, reaching for the birds. The left hand panel depicts the journey of figures in a boat, the seeking after or journeying to the source of knowledge. The far right hand panel is the garden, figures in a primitive state, a sort of evolution of figures from a primitive garden (the first garden). Visualization, verbalization, music and dance are tools we have to express a concept. The analysis of an art work is a delicate and sensitive task and great harm can be done in an attempt to become verbal about a form which relies upon elements peculiar to itself for intrinsic meaning." Originally French intended the mural to be five panels, each entitled (left to right) 'the Journey', 'Man', 'The Tree', 'The Earth', 'The Garden'. The finished mural was reduced to four panels with the central tree incorporated into the panels 'Earth' and 'Man'. Ballarat Teachers' College Art lecturer Arch Cuthbertson explained that the artist:- "Aims at evoking emotional flashed, opening doors to simultaneous thinking and feeling. To accomplish this he juxtaposes the threads of conscious and unconscious images, thus effecting a tapestry that allows many points of reference to converge upon his singular images. Whether the colours offer metaphysical sensations or convey a literal meaning will depend upon the breadth and depth of the viewer's experience. Similarly with the bird - we might well ask is it a defiance of gravity, a metaphysical ascension or the elusive winged knowledge? Again the answer could well be that these three associations have a singular purpose. " Artist Charles Bush unveiled the mural at the Ballarat Teachers' College in Gillies Street, Ballarat. At that time he said:- "You have left behind you on object which will be full of interest to a lot of people. A work of art, so long as it is in existence, is constantly under review. Most of the good things that keep on going are usually to the uninitiated a little worrying. Many of you will be worried by this, because it does not make its message immediately clear. But come back and assess it again and again."

Historical information

Leonard FRENCH (OBE) (08 October 1928 - 10 January 2017) Born Brunswick, Victoria Died Heathcote, Victoria Known for his enormous dalle de verre (concrete and slab glass) ceiling in the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Victoria Leonard French produced a large body of work throughout his lifetime. French won the Sulman Prize in 1960, and the Blake Prize for Religious Art in 1963 and in 1980. He was also awarded a Harkness Fellowship in 1965. In the Queen's Birthday Honours of June 1968 he was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. In early 1959 Leonard French was commissioned by the Ballarat Teachers' College students to paint a mural. The students were responsible for the payment of the work. When unveiled artist George Bush remarked: "the 1959 students have left something not just to 'oooh' and 'ah' at, but something that is thought provoking, arresting and interesting. This work of art keeps something in reserve and draws you to search for deeper meaning behind the splendour of colour. This mural is not one which will not fade the interest of its beholders, but one which will provide intrigue for generations to come." This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 2000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Artwork - Banksia burdettii by Celia Rosser

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Un-numbered limited edition offset photolithograph of Banksia burdetti (Burdett's Banksia) .

Historical information

Celia Rosser (1930- ) Born Melbourne, Victoria Celia Elizabeth Rosser is a renowned Australian botanical artist, best known for having published The Banksias, a three-volume series of monographs containing watercolour paintings of every Banksia species. She trained in Art at the Melbourne Institute of Technology In 1970, Celia was appointed Science Faculty Artist at Monash University. Four years later she was appointed University Botanical Artist, and began the project of painting every Banksia species. The project took over 25 years to complete, and resulted in the publication of a three volume monograph entitled The Banksias, with accompanying text by Alex George. Publication of the final volume in 2000 represented the first time that such a large genus has been entirely painted. In 1977 Celia Rosser was awarded the Linnaean Society of London's Jill Smythies Award for botanical illustration, and in 1995 was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia. Monash University awarded her an honorary Master of Science degree in 1981, and an honorary PhD in 1999. Banksia Rosserae is the last banksia species discovered and was named after the artist. Since 2002, the Friends of the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne have awarded the "Celia Rosser Medal for Botanical Art" to outstanding exhibitors at their "The Art of Botanical Illustration" exhibition.

Painting - Dr Paul Hemming, A0

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Academic portrait of Dr Paul Hemming, AO, former Chancellor of Federation University Australia.

Oil on Board - 'Hand III' by Loris Button

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Oil painting on paper depicting a hand holding an egg, mounted on wooden panel.

Historical information

Loris BUTTON (1951- ) Dr Loris Button grew up in Melbourne, completing undergraduate studies in painting and drawing at the Phillip Institute of Technology, followed by a Master of Fine Arts degree at the University of Tasmania. Her PhD thesis employed self portraiture as a means for reflecting on the self, time and ageing in contemporary culture. From 1981 – 1986 Loris lived and studied in Hobart before returning to Melbourne. Since 1990 she has lived and worked in Ballarat and the nearby town of Creswick. Loris retired from an academic career at the Arts Academy, University of Ballarat (now Federation University) at the end of 2010. Working with prints, paintings and drawings on handmade paper, her work is regularly shown in both solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia and overseas. A staff member of the Federation University Arts Academy in 1987 and 1990 to 2010 Loris has continued a post-retirment association with the Arts Academy through her role as an Adjunct Research Fellow. This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 1000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Watercolour and pastel on paper - 'Still Life With Lantern' by Sue Jarvis

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Framed still life featuring a bowl of apples, a saucepan and a lamp. Gift of Dr David Alexander, 2013

Artwork - 'Drawing The Signs: 1998 Self Portrait' from the "Memento" series

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Self portrait of artist.

Historical information

Loris BUTTON (1951- ) Loris BUTTON (1951- ) Dr Loris Button grew up in Melbourne, completing undergraduate studies in painting and drawing at the Phillip Institute of Technology, followed by a Master of Fine Arts degree at the University of Tasmania. Her PhD thesis employed self portraiture as a means for reflecting on the self, time and ageing in contemporary culture. From 1981 – 1986 Loris lived and studied in Hobart before returning to Melbourne. Since 1990 she has lived and worked in Ballarat and the nearby town of Creswick. Loris retired from an academic career at the Arts Academy, University of Ballarat (now Federation University) at the end of 2010. Working with prints, paintings and drawings on handmade paper, her work is regularly shown in both solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia and overseas. A staff member of the Federation University Arts Academy in 1987 and 1990 to 2010 Loris has continued a post-retirment association with the Arts Academy through her role as an Adjunct Research Fellow. This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 1000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Artwork - "West Park Proposition' by Ash Keating

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

'West Park Proposition', 2012, is a three channel and screen video installation, utilising multiple camera video documentation of an endurance painting intervention undertaken on the morning of 01 September 2012 on the east facing wall of a newly built tilt-slab industrial building, situated on the direct edge of the current urban and rural boundary in Truganina, Victoria. The multi-screen work documents an endurance guerilla-style action painting intervention and ritualised painting performance in which a symbolic violence is enacted against a storehouse of commodity production and consumption. Upon winning the award artists Ash Keating said; “The work was made near Ballarat on the Deer Park bypass. It is an aesthetic comment about the way these new tilt-slab industrial buildings spring up without caring for the environment." The work, which took eight hours to create, was about reclaiming the space from “cost-effective architecture” without any aesthetics. The inaugural judge for the Prize, Jason Smith, Director, Heide Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) said, "Selecting the winner of this inaugural GNAP was exhilarating and excruciating: exhilarating because the seriousness of each artist's enterprise, and their uncompromising resolution of concepts, has created an inaugural exhibition of exceptional power. This first GNAP is a survey of some of the most poetic and provocative imaginations working in Australia today. Selecting one winner from such a show in which each of these artists has in some way transformed my thinking about the world was the excruciating part. Ash Keating's work West Park Proposition, 2012 kept drawing me back in the several hours I spent viewing the works. It simultaneously affirms the political and critical role of the artist as a key agent of change and action, and someone who reminds us of the beauty and resilience of humanity and nature in the face of unrelenting change. As a work combining performance, collaboration and hope, Keating's West Park Proposition is a work of immense and compelling poetry."

Historical information

This artwork won the 2012 Guirguis New Art Prize, a prestigious national acquisitive biennial art prize administered by Federation University Australia. The Guirguis New Art Prize (GNAP) is a national acquisitive $20,000 contemporary art prize which presents a selection of Australia's most exciting contemporary artists with works that explore and embrace new ways of artistic expression, utilising existing mediums and new technologies in innovative ways. Initiated and generously supported by local Ballarat surgeon Mr Mark Guirguis, this prestigious art prize is administered by the Federation University Australia (FedUni). As a local philanthropist and art collector, in developing the Prize, Mark Guirguis' aims were to celebrate the significance of the arts to communities and to Ballarat, emphasising contemporary art and 'living' culture, and to highlight FedUni's Arts Academy. Artist Ash Keating works across a conceptual, site-responsive and often collaborative art practice that incorporates painting, sculpture, installation, video, performance and public interventions, and has referenced a wide range of social and environmental issues within his art. Frequently working beyond the gallery, and often harnessing community narrative and energy, his work also draws upon myth, ritual and ceremony.

Printmaking - linoprint - 'Fragments of Time' by Loris Button

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Twenty Five unique state linoprints on handmade abaca and cotton rag papers mounted together with insect pins. This work formed part of the Artist's PhD research.

Historical information

Loris BUTTON (1951- ) Dr Loris Button grew up in Melbourne, completing undergraduate studies in painting and drawing at the Phillip Institute of Technology, followed by a Master of Fine Arts degree at the University of Tasmania. Her PhD thesis employed self portraiture as a means for reflecting on the self, time and ageing in contemporary culture. From 1981 – 1986 Loris lived and studied in Hobart before returning to Melbourne. Since 1990 she has lived and worked in Ballarat and the nearby town of Creswick. Loris retired from an academic career at the Arts Academy, University of Ballarat (now Federation University) at the end of 2010. Working with prints, paintings and drawings on handmade paper, her work is regularly shown in both solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia and overseas. A staff member of the Federation University Arts Academy in 1987 and 1990 to 2010 Loris has continued a post-retirment association with the Arts Academy through her role as an Adjunct Research Fellow. This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 2000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Artwork - photolithograph - Banksia media (Southern Plains Banksia) by Celia Rosser, 1987

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Unframed photolithograph of Banksia media (Southern Plains Banksia)

Historical information

In 1977 Celia Rosser was awarded the Linnaean Society of London's Jill Smythies Award for botanical illustration, and in 1995 was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia. Monash University awarded her an honorary Master of Science degree in 1981, and an honorary PhD in 1999. Banksia Rosserae is the last banksia species discovered and was named after the artist. Since 2002, the Friends of the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne have awarded the "Celia Rosser Medal for Botanical Art" to outstanding exhibitors at their "The Art of Botanical Illustration" exhibition.

Artwork - Dyirranga: 'A Long Journey' - Possum Skin Cloak by the Ballarat School of Mines Koorie Art Class

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

A number of possum skin pelts stitched together, engraved and coloured with ochre. The work was undertaken by students in the Ballarat School of Mines Advanced Certificate of Koori Art and Design in 2002. Artists: Greg Clark, Laura Guest, Tim Karpany, Kym Krasa, Joe Lee, Jason Marks, Sam Morrison, Bianca Nikkelson, Diana Nikkelson, Kelly Saylor.

Historical information

This project was initiated by teacher Fred Cahir inspired by an 1894 painting by Eugene Von Guerard called 'Barter', which depicted the exchange of possum skins between indigenous peoples and white settlers in the early 1800s. The students were each directed to research their own stories and totems which would then become the basis for the possum skin cloak design. Further discussions led to the central image and overall theme - the platypus. The swimming, egg laying marsupial, with its duck bill and webbed feet, aptly represented Ballarat and its many nations of people who journeys far to settle here, so too the artists who worked on the project - indigenous peoples from different 'nations' around Victoria and Australia. Prior to starting the project research was undertaken into how possum skin claks were traditionally made. Due to the fact that possums were, and still are, a protected species in Australia; twenty pelts were sourced from New Zealand. Textile teacher Valda D'Angri worked with students on sewing the pelts together with kangaroo gut, burning designs into the skins and creating a permanent resin for the ochres that had been collected from the surrounding areas by the artists themselves. Apart from the platypus, there are ten different designs adorning the cloak; the eel trap, whale, cockatoo, snake, turtle, fish, eagle, emu, swan and the gathering place. The cloak is relatively smaller than traditional cloaks, which used anywhere between 60-80 pelts. This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 1000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Significance

This Possum Skin Cloak was created by eleven indigenous student.

Bookplate - Ex Libris Bookplate

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Framed limited edition ex libris bookplate for James West. If features a male holding an 'ex libris' flag. Gift of the Keith Wingrove Memorial Trust, 2015

Historical information

The Keith Wingrove Trust conducts a competition among Australian artists, graphic designers and students for the production of Ex Libris Bookplates. The competition is called The Australian Bookplate Design Award. The purpose of the competition is to increase interest in and to attract publicity to the artistic value of bookplates. Although the competition is referred to as 'Australian' there is a category of award open to International artists. This bookplate was part of the 2013 Australian Bookplate Award. Gift of the Keith Wingrove Memorial Trust, 2015

Inscriptions & Markings

Edition: 1/3

Timber, acrylic paint, glass coat, beeswax - 'Frog Didgeridoo' by Peter Clarke

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Mallee Wood didgeridoo with vibrant colours. A natural wood imperfections have been used to emphasise what is recognisable as a frog. This work was purchased from the "My Art, My Life, My Colours' exhibition at the Federation University Post Office Gallery, May 2008.

Historical information

Peter CLARKE (1969- ) Gunditjamara (Lake Condah) Born Heywood, Victoria At two months old Peter Clarke was removed from his parents and placed in a Catholic boy's orphanage in Ballarat. The orphanage was closed and Peter was moved to a public orphanage where he discovered 'manners were not a necessity and you often had to take before you were ever given in this orphanage. ... This new orphanage was not a home for me but a prison of sadness and despair.' Disconnected from his country and lore Peter Clarke chose "my own path to land, county and water". Although his childhood memories are dark and bleak, he uses vibrant colours. This item is part of the Federation University Art Collection. The Art Collection features over 1000 works and was listed as a 'Ballarat Treasure' in 2007.

Sculpture - Installation - 'Dead Still Standing' by Lou Hubbard

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

'Dead Still Standing ' won the was awarded the prestigious 2015 $20,000 Guirguis New Art Prize.

Historical information

In announcing the award 2015 Guiguis New Art Award the judges applauded Hubbard on her compelling installation, which comprised a deflated, disembowelled latex horse collapsed over a Coalbrookdale patio chair, table and bench seat situated over a skateboard and plastic dog. “Occupying a space between the traditions of equine, assemblage and unmonumental sculpture, Lou Hubbard’s Dead Still Standing confounds and compels viewers in its uncanny play of materials and movement,” senior curator, contemporary art, National Gallery of Victoria and judge Max Delany said. “In this elaborate yet concise work, Hubbard has created a form of surprising and unsettling effect that reflects our experience of a world in translation.” The win came as a surprise for Hubbard, who said she was overwhelmed at the talent of all 15 finalists. “I was so surprised, because I was in good company with the other artists, who were all quite extraordinary,” she said. “In the nature of the competition, I feel very lucky.” With multi-layer meanings to her piece, Hubbard said it was actually Ballarat’s rich history that inspired her work. She said it was the Ballarat goldfields and the idea of what horses might have gone through during those years that gave her a concept to work with. But that wasn’t the only source of ideals portrayed in the piece – Hubbard also explored the effect training had on horses. “The horse stands in a way that portrays (how) the human exhorts the way of training,” she said. “The horse is edging like it wants to move, which is impossible, and the furniture acts in lots of ways. The chair, for example, is like the horse’s ribs, which are being ripped out.” It was these multiple meanings that also had the curator of the Post Office Gallery, Shelley Hinton, impressed with the work. “The work challenges us ethically and culturally, in a way that pleads for analysis, as we do in our complex daily lives,” she said.

Artwork - 'Thursday at 10' by Millicent Reed

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

Woven tapestry in eight panels, each with seven images. Artist's Statement: "Every Wednesday at 10 o'clock in the morning, from the beginning of Winter, 2011 to the end of Autumn, 2012, I photographed the same scene in my Ballarat garden. While the main subject is the weather of the moment, it includes a walnut tree killed in the recent drought, and a deciduous ornamental plum. There are 52 Wednesdays recorded in the tapestry; and 4 franes showing the seasonal changes in the plum tree. The colours bordering each panel are those of deciduous leaves on trees in my garden that week. It is said we only know eternity in the pulse of the moment; and permanence in the cycle of the seasons."

Artwork - 'Jobs, Policy and LOST' (tryptich) by Patrice Mahoney

Federation University Australia Art Collection ,

This unique edition triptych involves the techniques of intaglio copper plate, pigment, soft ground, open bite, aquatint, spit-bite, stamping, relief, drawing and burnishing on paper. It was awarded the 2014 Victorian Indigenous Art Awards Federation University Acquisitive Award for for work by a Victorian regional artist. Artist's Statement: These works are a display of my frustration of hour our family were lucky we were not beheaded, scalped, taken away and impaled as a warning to others not to enter farming lands, which had been traditional lands of the Nganyaywana country. The word 'Policy' represents the White Australia Policy, the word "Lost' stands for those lost including hundreds of family members, 'Jobs' asks why Aboriginal people can only find employment if through Aboriginal positions and policies,. The number 3 symbolises myself and my siblings, red is for bloodshed, blue is for secrets and black the family history. The Selection Panel of the 2014 Victorian Indigenous Art Awards made the following comments on the work: 'The selection panel for the Federation University Acquisitive Award for 2014 were highly impressed by this work and applauded the vigorous use of symbolism and metaphor in a well scripted visual composition. The poignancy of connectedness to the past, memory, place and country is palpable and enhanced by the suggestive employment of text and minimal colour. A provocative and evocative work of art!

Historical information

Patrice MAHONEY Anewan/Nganyaywan/Dunghutti country. Patrice Mahoney is a printmaker, sculptor, weaver, drawer and painter. he work challenges mainstream and Aboriginal Australians and is profoundly influenced by space, place and country, taking inspiration from nature, environment and looking forward to a time when she can return to her family's traditional country to make work. In 2012 the artist completed a Bachelor of Visual and Media Arts at Monash University’s Churchill campus (from 2014 Federation University's Churchill Campus). The Victorian Indigenous Art Awards 2014 were exhibited and judged at the Art Gallery of Ballarat.