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Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Melbourne, Victoria

The Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has a membership of more than 80,000 nurses, midwives and carers employed in a range of health services including hospitals, aged care, community health, mental health, maternal and child health, medical clinics and prisons.

The core business of the ANMF (Vic Branch) is the representation of the professional and industrial interests of our members and the professions of nursing and midwifery. Additionally, the ANMF (Vic Branch) provides both nationally accredited courses and offers face to face and online professional development for nurses, midwives and personal care workers through the ANMF (Vic Branch) Education Centre.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 12600 A'Beckett Street Melbourne Victoria 8006 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 9602 8500

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 8:45am-5:00pm. The library is closed on weekends and during public holidays.

Location

Level 1 535 Elizabeth St Melbourne Victoria

View on Google Maps

The library holds specialist print collections relating to nursing and midwifery practice, education, history and working conditions. Our special collection includes primary materials from the historic 1986 50-day Victorian nurses strike and UNA, the journal of the Victorian Trained Nurses Association (1903-1974).

These records are digitised by this organisation on Victorian Collections for the purposes of education and preservation. If you believe that we have infringed your copyright please contact us and we will remove the material from the site.

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93 items

Australian Nursing Federation bumper sticker

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular white and blue bumper sticker. Sticker printed with 'Nurses. We can't live without them.' in large blue font.

Historical information

Bumper sticker designed for community to show support for nurses. This sticker is one of many pieces of campaign materials and merchandise produced by the Australian Nursing Federation.

'Hands off Medicare' protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and green plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with the green text 'HANDS OFF MEDICARE'.

'Save Fairfield Hospital' badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with the red text 'SAVE FAIRFIELD HOSPITAL'. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back.

Historical information

Fairfield Hospital opened in 1904 as the Queen's Memorial Infectious Diseases Hospital, the first purpose-built isolation hospital for infectious diseases in Victoria. Its 22-acre site was located on a bank of the Yarra River. It was renamed Fairfield Hospital in 1948. In its later years, the hospital was a centre for AIDS treatment in Victoria, and a passionate campaign fought against its planned closure in the 1990s. Fairfield Hospital finally closed in June 1996. One section of the site was gazetted as a Public Park and Memorial Garden (containing an AIDS Garden).

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular green and purple badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'A.N.F. [Australian Nursing Federation] securing a future for Enrolled Nurses'.

Historical information

Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) badge promoting Enrolled Nurses (also known as Division 2 Nurses, ENs). ENs are registered health practitioners who have completed, at a minimum, a diploma qualification in order to practice. ENs typically work under the direction and supervision of a registered nurse to provide support and care for patients in a range of healthcare settings. This badge was possibly distributed to ANF EN members attending the 1999 Annual ANF Division 2 Conference that focused on pathways to the future for this group of nurses. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, further suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

29-minute video documentary on the history of the Victorian nurses union - The rise and rise of the Victorian nurses' union

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

29 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original DVD. In colour, with sound. Original distributed (not sold) on DVD.

Historical information

The short documentary 'The rise and rise of the Victorian nurses' union' was released on DVD only in 2006. It tells the story of the Branch from its inception, charting major industrial and professional developments for nurses in Victoria over the past century. In particular, it focuses on the shortage of nurses that Victoria experienced from the 1970s to the 1990s, the removal of the 'no-strike' clause from the organisation's rules, the resultant historic 50-day 1986 Victorian nurses' strike and the growth in membership in the context of overall declining union membership in Australia.

Australian Nursing Federation strike remembrance campaign sticker

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and blue sticker. Sticker has warped and faded due to age. Sticker printed with 'Nurses act in '96 protecting gains of '86', the Australian Nursing Federation logo and 'Join the ANF Tel: 9347 0333'.

Historical information

Run as part of recruitment campaign in 1996, a decade on from the 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike, the longest strike in Victorian nursing history. The 1990s saw new challenges for Victorian nurses, as the state government oversaw the widespread privatisation of the public health service and industrial reforms that gave greater power to employers. This resulted in site closures and the watering down of worker rights and conditions. This sticker recognises that the challenges for nurses are ongoing and encourages collective action.

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch delegate pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Red, black and gold pin in the shape of the state of Victoria, Australia. Printed with 'ANF AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION REPRESENTATIVE'.

Historical information

Pin awarded to, and worn by, union delegates/job representatives of the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF). Job representatives, or 'job reps', represent nurses and midwives and the union in the workplace. They provide information and advice on employee rights and conditions and referrals to the ANF when appropriate. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this pin is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

1987 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio, featuring audio recording of a members mass meeting at the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre. Historical information on program taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue and white plastic button. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The title for a 'Grade 1' nurse is now a 'Division 1' or (more commonly) 'Registered Nurse'. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right).

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation Victorian Branch campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red, black and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Save Our School Nurse' and ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. The first characters of 'Save Our School' are italicised to highlight the acronym 'SOS'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members working as school nurses, and possibly distributed to members of the public. The ANF Victorian Branch bargains on behalf of nurses working in primary and secondary schools, particularly those employed by the Victorian Department of Education and Training, as well as those working in Catholic and independent schools. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Card from Queensland Nurses Union (Bundaberg Branch) to Catherine Hutchings, visiting Victorian nurses union staff member

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Typed card given with flower bouquet. Printed on one side with personalised, typed message 'DEAR CATHERINE, UNITED WE STAND DEVIDED [sic] WE BEG THANKS FOR SPEAKING UP FOR US. FROM B'BERG [Bundaberg] BRANCH Q.N.U. [Queensland Nurses Union]'.

Historical information

Thank-you card given to Australian Nursing Federation (Victorian Branch) staff member Catherine Hutchings by staff at the Bundaberg Branch of the Queensland Nurses Union. In 1993, Victorian Branch staff travelled throughout Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory for a series of meetings on recent events impacting nurses' conditions in Victoria. The meetings were strategically held ahead of the 1993 Federal election to discourage the election of a Coalition government. The election of the Coalition government in Victoria in 1992 had seen the introduction of the Employee Relations Act, which saw the end of the state award system in Victoria. This gave employers greater powers to establish wages and conditions and less power to the Industrial Relations Commission, foreshadowing what would later occur at a Federal level. An article in the Victorian Branch newsletter 'On the Record' from April 1993 describes the 'tour'. Entitled 'Vic. Nurses Spreading the Word in Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory', it explains: "Catherine Huntchin[g]s and Elizabeth Hulme recently spent a week in Queensland informing nurses about the effect of a Liberal Government on nurses. As well, Tracy Austin visited WA to talk to nurses there about life under Kenneyt [sic]. Catherine and Liz held a total of 23 meetings from Cairns to Brisbane, as well as giving media interviews. It was well worth the effort and certainly there was much support given to nurses in Victoria. Perhaps the most interesting issue was that many nurses did not realise that they may find themselves in the same situation if we have a change in Federal Government. In February, Catherine went to the NT to talk to nurses in Darwin, Alice Springs and Katherine and despite some minor hiccoughs (the Health Department banned all the meetings so alternative venues had to be found) the turnout was gratifying - you have to be dedicated to attend a meeting held in a carpark in 32 C heat! Catherine says that the reception she received in both QLD and the NT was superb. "Everyone went out of their way to make us feel very welcome, and to shower us with sympathy over the situation. More important, is the fact that the information was distributed so no matter how the votes go on March 13 [1993, federal election] - they will be informed votes." she said. Catherine, Liz and Tracy extend sincere thanks to all interstate nurses who made their visits a success."

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation]' and 'Vic. [Victorian] Branch', as well as the text 'Overworked Nurses = Undercared Patients'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved workloads and wages in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. During the 1970s and 1980s, the state of Victoria had an acute nursing shortage, and patient workloads were unsafe. Throughout the 1980s, Victorian nurses took drastic industrial action to improve wages and conditions, culminating in the historic 50-day strike in 1986. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red, white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'FUND NURSING PROPERLY FOR A BETTER STATE OF HEALTH', 'EBA 07' [enterprise bargaining agreement 2007] and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] website address of the time (www.anfvic.asn.au).

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members during the bargaining process for Victorian nurses' wages and conditions in 2007. Enterprise bargaining is the process of negotiation generally between the employer and employees (often represented by a trade union, professional association or other bargaining representative) with the goal of making an enterprise agreement stipulating the wages and conditions of work. The 2007 public sector campaign entitled 'Fund nursing properly for a better state of health' involved the ANF bargaining for members employed in the public acute and aged care sector, public psychiatric services, the Australian Red Cross Blood Service and the Royal District Nursing Service. The 2007 campaign focused on improved workloads and skill mix and a minimum 18 per cent wage increase to address the wage disparity between Victorian nurses and nurses working in other Australian states.

28-minute video documentary on nurse to patient ratios in Victoria - Battle : the road to ratios [legislation]

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

28 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format). In colour, with sound. Original produced digitally.

Historical information

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Branch (Vic Branch) members achieved staffing ratios in the Victorian public health system in 2000 and campaigned throughout 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2011-12 to keep them in workplace agreements. After strong campaigning, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. The short digital documentary, 'Battle: The Road to Ratios [Legislation]', tells the story of this campaigning, from the nurse shortage crisis in 2000 to ratio laws in 2015. The documentary, produced by Black Sheep Films, was first shown at the 2016 Annual Delegates Conference to more than 700 ANMF Job Reps and Health and Safety Reps. The documentary features interviews with current and former ANMF leadership and Job Reps, academics, and journalists.

Florence Nightingale note to Annie Miller

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Hand written note by Florence Nightingale to Annie Miller, upon her departure to Sydney with Lucy Osburn in 1868, written in ink on a blank page at the front of Walter Scott's 'Poetical works' (1866)

Historical information

'Miss Annie Miller, who had nursed Prince Alfred with Miss Turriff [Haldane, first matron of Alfred Hospital], also joined staff at the Alfred some time before 1876. During her time at the Sydney Infirmary, Annie Miller created something of a stir when, after her experience nursing Prince Alfred, she became selective about which areas of the hospital she would work, only willing to serve in Male Surgical and Accident. She also had been reported to Miss Nightingale by both Lucy Osburn and Haldane Turriff for openly flirting with the Resident Physician, receiving flowers, embroidering slippers, playing with his watch chain and generally becoming the subject of gossip ... Before his departure from the hospital the doctor in question diagnosed Annie Miller as having an [abdominal] aneurism and she went into decline, mainly from the deprivation of his company, it was felt. With the threat of her possibly being returned to England because of ill health, Miller went to Brisbane and Goodna (Queensland), subsequently to Melbourne, where she faded into obscurity. Her aneurism had apparently subsided.' From '5.30, nurse! : the story of the Alfred nurses' by Helen Paterson. History Books: Melbourne, 1996 p. 8 'Annie Miller was Scottish, single and claimed to be 34 years old (in Sydney, she was assumed to be ten years older); Wardroper [Sarah Elizabeth, first superintendent at the Nightingale School of Nursing at St Thomas's Hospital, London] had found her to be a good nurse, but 'proud and peculiarly sensitive'' (Burrows, 2018 p. 33). At the end of 1870 Annie resigned after the three-year term at Sydney Infirmary ended. She was appointed to the position of matron at Brisbane Hospital in February 1871. She resigned within a few months of her appointment after a dispute with the staff surgeon who refused to recognise her and her status. From 'Nurses of Australia : the illustrated history' by Deborah Burrows. NLA Publishing : Canberra, 2018 p. 41 'Annie Miller went from the [Sydney] Infirmary to Brisbane Hospital, she then joined Haldane Turriff at The Alfred Hospital, while Osburn thought that Miller had gone to nurse private patients. The two versions are not incompatible as hospitals hired out nurses to care for wealthier patients in their homes. Schultz records that Miller worked at the Hospital for the Insane at Goodna [Queensland] and died in the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum on 12 March 1907. The Victorian branch of the Australian Nursing Federation owns the book presented to Miller by Florence Nightingale in 1867.' From 'Lucy Osburn, a lady displaced : Florence Nightingale's envoy to Australia' by Judith Godden. Sydney University Press : Sydney, 2006 p. 315 'This betrayal of all that had been said to Tate [Henry, Alfred Hospital Secretary-Manager 1874-1876] was in keeping with Annie Miller's reputation (earned in Sydney) for being unreliable and a trouble-maker. Miss Miller was also an intimate of Miss Turriff's. Annie Miller is said to have had a brief term as matron in Brisbane after her resignation from the Sydney Infirmary in 1870 but the Brisbane Hospital authorities are unable to provide this one way of the other. Lucy Osburn thought that Miss Miller was in private nursing in Melbourne in 1873 and the Vagabond [alias of John Stanley James, Argus journalist] stated positively that she was working for Miss Turriff at the Alfred when he was there in 1876'. From 'The hospital south of the Yarra' by Ann Mitchell. Alfred Hospital : Melbourne, 1977 p. 242 'Annie Miller was appointed matron of the lunatic asylum at Woogaroo (Goodna) in Queensland in 1877, and remained there for ten years. When she left the medical superintendent, in his report for 1888, praised her for the work she had done in the female division of the asylum'. From 'A tapestry of service' by Bartz Schultz. Churchill Livingstone : South Melbourne, 1991 p.222

Significance

Annie Miller was one of five Nightingale-trained nurses who come to Sydney in 1868 with Lucy Osburn, the newly appointed Superintendent and Chief Female Officer at the Sydney Infirmary. Florence Nightingale gave them all books before they sailed in December of that year. Annie worked in Sydney, Brisbane and Goodna, and in Melbourne. She died in 1907 and is buried at Boroondara cemetery. Annie was a member of the Royal Victorian Trained Nurses' Association. This note was written in Annie's book and this item is in the archive collection of the ANMF Vic Branch Library. The note was written on the front page of a book. We believe the item was donated to the Branch.

Inscriptions & Markings

"For Mrs. Miller affectionately offered in remembrance of her own Scotch country by Florence Nightingale London 27 Nov. 1867"

Customised Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge, customised with black permanent marker. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right). (Unknown) former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

Inscriptions & Markings

Former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation International Nurses Day badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow and blue badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the blue text 'International Nurses Day', '12 May 2002', and 'Celebrating Nursing'.

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'NURSES Too Good to Lose' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation members. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

32-minute video documentary on 1986 Victorian nurses strike - Breaking point: the 1986 nurses strike, 10 years on

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

39 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from original videocassette. In colour, with sound. Original was released with a booklet explaining the broader context for the documentary.

Historical information

In October 1986, Victorian nurses began an historic strike action which was to last 50 days. Breaking Point (1998) is a retrospective work, reflecting on the 10 years following the 1986 Victorian strike. It was produced by Mark Bird and Nicholas Bird (of Waterbyrd Filmz, the production company that, as outlined above, also made Vivien Bullwinkel, Nurse TV and Australian Nurses). In this film, it is not primarily images of striking nurses and the words of striking nurses that tell the story, but the voice-over. The narrator (Patrick J. Bonello) positions the strike alongside other national and world events of 1986, ‘the year that changed the nursing profession in Australia forever’. In this film, the strike is framed as a pivotal one in the history of Australian nurses, and one that affected individual nurses deeply and transformed their profession irrevocably. There is a conscious discussion on the emotional effects of the 1986 strike – relationships broke up, people had no money, unionists could not feed their families, it was hard to keep going, families fought over the strike, picketing nurses recalled getting spat at, and there was even a death threat. [Description adapted from Milner & Brigden, 2014, pp. 116; 118]

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red, white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'nurse patient ratios: HERE TO STAY!' and the Australian Nursing Federation logo.

Historical information

Distributed to Australian Nursing Federation members during bargaining for public sector nurse to patient ratios. During this period ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015.

Victorian School Nurses special interest group pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangle-shaped, gold and ivory-coloured pin with green, blue, yellow and black images and text. Pin printed with 'VSN victorian school nurses ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] (Vic[torian] Branch) S.I.G. [special interest group]. Pin includes images of three stick figures of different sizes in green, blue, and yellow.

Australian Nursing Federation aged care campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue, green and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Quality Aged Care needs Qualified Nurses' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. 'needs' is italicised and 'Qualified Nurses' is underlined.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for more funding and qualified nurses to improve the quality of aged care for the past several decades, and continues to do so. Aged care campaigning became particularly prominent in the late 1990s and 2000s, with large campaigns by both the national and state/territory branches of the ANF. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Smash and Grab' broadcast featuring nurses and guests discussing Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Three audio files (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of 'Smash and Grab' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation/Western Hospital delegate/member badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular orange/red badge with blue writing and logo. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'ANF at the Western Hospital' the number '45' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn amongst Australian Nursing Federation members employed at Western Hospital (now Footscray Hospital). Possibly worn only by delegates/union representatives at this workplace, and/or celebrating 45 years of the Western Hospital (this occurred in 1998). The Western Hospital changed its name to Footscray Hospital in July 2014 and is located at 160 Gordon St, Footscray, Victoria, Australia.

Video recording and proceedings of 'Ethics and Legal Problems in Resuscitation' seminar, 20 March 1991, Geelong Hospital

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

115 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from VHS tape. In colour, with sound. Video shows proceedings of 'Ethics and Legal Problems in Resuscitation' seminar at The Geelong Hospital on Wednesday 20 March 1991. An image file shows a scan of the proceedings of the seminar, with handwritten notes indicating the name of those asking questions during discussion.

Historical information

Written proceedings and video recording of a seminar held at the Geelong Hospital on 20 March 1991. The topic of the seminar, ethics and legal problems in resuscitation, resulted in a heated debate among attendees. Several doctors took issue with a presentation by Megan-Jane Johnstone, a nurse, ethicist and academic, in regards to documenting decision-making, patients' rights and guidelines around resuscitation. Other speakers included Paul Mestitz (Physician at Geelong Hospital) and Brian Bourke (Barrister). The seminar took place from 7.45-9:45pm in the John Lindell Lecture Theatre at the Geelong Hospital. The content was donated to the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) on a USB by Megan-Jane Johnstone, with the aim of raising awareness of how members of the medical profession debate and respond to ethical and legal concerns in healthcare. The original was given to the donor on VHS in 1991.