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Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Melbourne, Victoria

The Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has a membership of more than 80,000 nurses, midwives and carers employed in a range of health services including hospitals, aged care, community health, mental health, maternal and child health, medical clinics and prisons.

The core business of the ANMF (Vic Branch) is the representation of the professional and industrial interests of our members and the professions of nursing and midwifery. Additionally, the ANMF (Vic Branch) provides both nationally accredited courses and offers face to face and online professional development for nurses, midwives and personal care workers through the ANMF (Vic Branch) Education Centre.

Contact Information

location
PO Box 12600 A'Beckett Street Melbourne Victoria 8006 (map)
phone
+61 +61 3 9602 8500

Contact

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 8:45am-5:00pm. The library is closed on weekends and during public holidays.

Location

Level 1 535 Elizabeth St Melbourne Victoria

View on Google Maps

The library holds specialist print collections relating to nursing and midwifery practice, education, history and working conditions. Our special collection includes primary materials from the historic 1986 50-day Victorian nurses strike and UNA, the journal of the Victorian Trained Nurses Association (1903-1974).

These records are digitised by this organisation on Victorian Collections for the purposes of education and preservation. If you believe that we have infringed your copyright please contact us and we will remove the material from the site.

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93 items

Australian Nursing Federation WorkChoices protest badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow, red and white badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue and white ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the black text '[then-Prime Minister John] Howard targets nurses' and a Ron Tandberg cartoon of a nurse with a 'sniper target' overlay.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as part of a 2006 campaign protesting the controversial 'WorkChoices' federal industrial relations laws that were introduced by the Liberal John Howard government in 2005-2007. These laws saw the weakening of unfair dismissal laws, giving employers significantly more powers to strip existing rights and wages away. The laws were repealed following the election of an opposition Labor government in 2007 under Kevin Rudd. The 'Howard Target Nurses' campaign was featured in ANF Victorian Branch newsletters around late 2006. During this period, a number of enterprising bargaining agreements were set to soon expire, leaving nurses vulnerable to have rights stripped away under the new IR legislation. A large campaign began, with rallies across the state of Victoria. The August 2006 Branch newsletter featured images of the Tandberg 'Howard targets nurses' design on placards, shirts and badges worn by nurses at these rallies. The illustration by The Age cartoonist Ron Tandberg made reference to John Howard's involvement in wars in the Middle East throughout the early 2000s, and linked this to the 'war' on unions and worker rights.

1998 Australian federal election campaign material by Victorian Trades Hall focusing on industrial relations

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

1998 federal election campaign material by Victorian Trades Hall. Full colour bi-fold brochure, using images depicting 1998 Australian waterfront dispute. Text on front: 'Welcome to John Howard's Australia. In 1996, John Howard promised that under his industrial relations laws, 'no worker would be worse off'. In 1998, his government cheered on the illegal sacking of 2000 workers. His laws have changed our system from one of fairness and decency to a system that encourages conflict and division. John Howard's laws are undermining Australian wages and working conditions by attacking unions, encouraging individual contracts and dismantling the award system and the Industrial Relations Commission. On October 3rd [1998], use your vote wisely Your job may depend on it.' Text on rear: 'Five Facts About Industrial Relations Under John Howard Workers have lost award conditions and legal protections. Australian wages are being undermined by individual contracts and non-union agreements. Companies can use corporate law to sack workforces and not pay wages owed. Workers have been sacked because they belong to a Union. Conflict and Division in the workforce has increased. On October 3rd [1998], use your vote wisely. Your job may depend on it.'

Historical information

Owned by long-time Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) Professional Officer Catherine Hutchings.

Australian Nursing Federation aged care recruitment fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and blue fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSING keeps the CARE in aged CARE', 'Join the [Australian Nursing Federation] ANF', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Royal Australian Nursing Federation student nurse pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Oval-shaped green, red and gold pin. pin printed with 'R.A.N.F.' [Royal Australian Nursing Federation], 'STUDENT NURSE UNIT', and the acronym 'SNU' in the shape of Australia.

Historical information

Pin given to, and worn by, student nurse members of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation (R.A.N.F.). This badge is likely from a period when nursing education was moving from hospital-based training to tertiary settings. A 2013 report from the Federal Department of Health provides this following overview of nursing education: "during the mid-1980s, nursing education commenced a period of change from being hospital-based to being conducted in tertiary settings, with practical clinical experience components. By 1993, all registered nursing students in Australia were entering the profession via the university education pathway". The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the 1980s.

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and yellow badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'no more than 1 to 4'.

Historical information

Button worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as an ongoing campaign in the 1990s to 2000s to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. 'no more than 1 to 4' denotes a ratio of one nurse to a maximum of four patients. During this period, staffing ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red and white plastic button. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'I SUPPORT R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation]' and 'R.A.N.F. Vic. [Victoria]'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The text on the button, 'I SUPPORT R.A.N.F.' suggests that this badge was also distributed to members of the union movement and broader public to build community support for industrial action taken by nurses. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red, white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'nurse patient ratios: HERE TO STAY!' and the Australian Nursing Federation logo.

Historical information

Distributed to Australian Nursing Federation members during bargaining for public sector nurse to patient ratios. During this period ratios were secured as part of bargaining negotiations between unions and employer groups. After decades of campaigning from the ANF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Flyer for protest about industrial relations reform at Trades Hall, 30 September 1998

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Colour flyer advertising union-led protest ahead of the 1998 Australian federal election. Image depicts 'scab' labour used in 1998 waterfront dispute. along with an authorisation and the following text: 'feeling relaxed & comfortable in John Howard's Australia? protest against Howard's IR laws 10 am Wed. 30 Sept. Trades Hall Cnr. Lygon & Victoria St. Carlton'.

Historical information

Owned by long-time Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) Professional Officer Catherine Hutchings.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation strike remembrance badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'I FOUGHT NURSES STRIKE 1986' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses who took part in campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, particularly those involved in the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. In October 1986, Victorian nurses began their longest strike after the failure of repeated talks with the health minister David White who was committed to reducing the classification and pay of almost half of Victoria’s nurses. Skeleton staff were left in the wards while picket lines, tents and caravans were set up outside hospitals in both metropolitan and regional Victoria. After 50 days of industrial action, Victorian nurses voted to return to work on 20 December 1986. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, and the strike concluded in December 1986, suggesting this badge was produced sometime between 1987 and 1989.

'Ask me! I'm a nurse' nursing badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with white text 'Ask me! I'm a Nurse'.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Round white and red plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Irene Bolger's Nurses Liberation Front'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, probably during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. Irene Bolger was elected Secretary of the Victorian Branch of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation from May 1986 to 1989. Renowned for her leadership during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike, she later became a barrister, primarily representing underprivileged clients. This badge was likely worn by members supporting Bolger's militant and divisive position on the strike.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic button. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Button printed with 'KEEP NURSES NURSING - Improve Nurses' Conditions' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right).

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'hands off nurses' awards!' and 'AUSTRALIAN NURSING FEDERATION'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation members campaigning against changes to nurses awards. The minimum wages and conditions an employee is entitled to are set out in awards (also known as modern awards). Awards don’t apply when an employer has an enterprise agreement or other registered agreement and the employee is covered by it. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'I used to be a Charge Nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. 'Charge Nurse' refers to a Nurse Manager, and is less commonly used in Australia presently (it is still widely used in North America). The badge's message aims to inform the public that highly experienced and skilled nurses are leaving the profession due to inadequate wages and poor working conditions. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right).

Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'I'm Taking a Stand for Patient Care' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation members. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s. The logo appears to be that of the federal ANF, rather than a particular state branch.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Victorian 2002 state election campaign coaster signed by Steve Bracks

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Double-sided square white coaster with blue and red text. Printed on front with Australian Labor Party logo and authorisation, along with the following text: 'BRACKS LABOR healthy meal ♢ more nurses ♢ more teachers ♢ more police ♢ more jobs ♢ more services ♢ decent government Bronwyn Pike MELBOURNE' Printed on rear with blue decorative border and the following text: 'LIBERAL DOYLE-Y ♢ take away schools ♢ take away nurses ♢ take away jobs ♢ take away services ♢ take away democracy'

Historical information

Campaign material for the Victorian Labor Party ahead of the 2002 Victorian State Election, campaigning for Bronwyn Pike in the seat of Melbourne. Education and health polled as key issues ahead of the election. Labor comfortably won the election, gaining 20 seats, returning Steve Bracks as Premier. Robert Doyle was the opposition leader. Despite a heavy loss and lacking popularity with the Victorian community, Doyle continued as opposition leader following the election.

Inscriptions & Markings

Signed in blue pen by Steve Bracks, the 44th Premier of Victoria (1999-2007). Stained on bottom corner. Printed by BR Printing, 30 Albermarle St, Kensington, Victoria.

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and red fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'NURSES. you can't live without them!', the Australian Nursing Federation logo and phone number ('03-9274 9333').

Australian Nursing Federation International Nurses Day badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow and blue badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the blue text 'International Nurses Day', '12 May 2002', and 'Celebrating Nursing'.

Customised Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular white and blue plastic badge, customised with black permanent marker. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Don't ask me, I'm a Grade 1 nurse' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation] Vic. [Victorian] Branch'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s, possibly during the historic 1986 Victorian 50-day nurses strike. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s. Similar to the badges worn in this photo [https://stories.anmfvic.asn.au/86strike/media/2560-1440-landscape-sec2-contentb-hr_logwf7a.jpg] from 1986 (see individual on the far right). (Unknown) former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

Inscriptions & Markings

Former owner of badge has written a 'DE' and 'd' with black permanent marker on the badge to spell 'Don't ask me, I'm a degraded nurse'.

Australian Nursing Federation nurse training campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with the white text 'University education for all Div[ision] 1 RNs [Registered Nurses] and [Registered Midwives]' and a small black and white image of a square academic/trencher cap.

Historical information

Button worn and distributed to staff and interested parties as part of a campaign that supported maintaining bachelor of nursing and midwivery programs in the university system. In late 2007-2008, regulatory authorities in Victoria were considering the possibility of education providers from the Vocational Education & Training (VET) sector (e.g. TAFEs and RTOs) receiving accreditation to offer bachelor-level nursing and midwifery qualifications. The Australian Nursing Federation (Victorian Branch), the peak industrial and professional body for Victorian nurses and midwives, resisted these moves, arguing that the approval of VET providers to offer Bachelor programs would have an adverse impact on the supply of registered nurses into the Victorian health workforce. Completion of a bachelor of nursing or midwifery remains a precondition of practising as a registered ('division 1') nurse or midwife in Australia.

Video recording and proceedings of 'Ethics and Legal Problems in Resuscitation' seminar, 20 March 1991, Geelong Hospital

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

115 minute video file (.mp4 multimedia format), transferred from VHS tape. In colour, with sound. Video shows proceedings of 'Ethics and Legal Problems in Resuscitation' seminar at The Geelong Hospital on Wednesday 20 March 1991. An image file shows a scan of the proceedings of the seminar, with handwritten notes indicating the name of those asking questions during discussion.

Historical information

Written proceedings and video recording of a seminar held at the Geelong Hospital on 20 March 1991. The topic of the seminar, ethics and legal problems in resuscitation, resulted in a heated debate among attendees. Several doctors took issue with a presentation by Megan-Jane Johnstone, a nurse, ethicist and academic, in regards to documenting decision-making, patients' rights and guidelines around resuscitation. Other speakers included Paul Mestitz (Physician at Geelong Hospital) and Brian Bourke (Barrister). The seminar took place from 7.45-9:45pm in the John Lindell Lecture Theatre at the Geelong Hospital. The content was donated to the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) on a USB by Megan-Jane Johnstone, with the aim of raising awareness of how members of the medical profession debate and respond to ethical and legal concerns in healthcare. The original was given to the donor on VHS in 1991.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Royal Australian Nursing Federation campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular black and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with an illustration of patients, a triangle design and with the words 'PROFESSIONAL', 'PRACTICE', 'STANDARDS', 'CARE' and 'R.A.N.F. [Royal Australian Nursing Federation]'.

Historical information

Distributed to nurses during campaigning for improved wages and working conditions in the 1980s. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation (RANF) became the Australian Nursing Federation in 1989, suggesting that this button is from the late 1980s.

Australian Nursing Federation fridge magnet

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangular gold and red fridge magnet. Magnet printed with 'The ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] represents Nurses ... ALL NURSES', 'For advice & assistance', the ANF logo and phone number ('03-92749333').

Australian Nursing Federation aged care campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular blue, green and white plastic badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with 'Quality Aged Care needs Qualified Nurses' and the ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo. 'needs' is italicised and 'Qualified Nurses' is underlined.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members. The ANF has been campaigning for more funding and qualified nurses to improve the quality of aged care for the past several decades, and continues to do so. Aged care campaigning became particularly prominent in the late 1990s and 2000s, with large campaigns by both the national and state/territory branches of the ANF. The Royal Australian Nursing Federation became the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 1989, and then became the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation in 2013, suggesting this badge is from the 1990s or early 2000s.

1986 recording of 3CR Community Radio 'Nurses' Update' broadcast featuring nurses discussing 1986 Victorian nurses strike

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Audio file (.mp3 multimedia format), transferred from compact disc recording.

Historical information

Broadcast of short-lived 'Nurses' Update' program on 3CR Community Radio. Historical information taken from 'Radical radio: celebrating 40 years of 3CR' (Ed. Juliet Fox, 2016, pp. 97-98): "Less than a week after the first hospital went out on strike, 3CR's Monday morning program Smash and Grab ran a special program on the issues surrounding the strike. Presenters Vig Geddes and Deb Welch recognised the nature of the nurses' struggle - a predominantly female union with a women leader - as a feminist issue, and that in this particular dispute, 3CR's long standing commitment to industrial coverage and its increasingly strong feminism converged. The issues being faced by nurses were being dismissed because nursing was seen as women's work. The response to the initial coverage of the dispute by 3CR was overwhelming. 'When we asked for talkback calls from the public, the lines were jammed, largely with callers wanting to offer their support to the nurses,' explained Deb Welch in the CRAM Guide February 1987. 'Others couldn't work out from the papers and the TV news what the strike was about. Many were outraged by the coverage the nurses had received and were fully aware how overworked and underpaid nurses have been.' In recognition of this outpouring of interest and support, 3CR decided to continue with a daily program - Nurses' Update. The program was presented by Vig and Deb every morning at 10am, and featured a range of nurses voicing their experiences and their concerns. 'Every morning, three or four nurses would cram into the 3CR studios and talk about the type of work they did, the pressures they worked under, their passion for nursing, their problems with the new award, why nurses' conditions are a women's issue, problems with understaffing and chronic tiredness, nursing history, relations between nurses and doctors - in fact the endless range of issues were what made the dispute so complex and history, reflects Deb [Welch]."

Australian Nursing Federation ratios campaign badge

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Circular yellow, blue and white badge. Silver metal, plastic-coated, with safety pin fastener adhered to back. Badge printed with a blue and white ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] logo, the text 'Nurses Nursing the system back to health' and the (then) website of the ANF (Victorian Branch), 'www.vicnet.net.au/~anfvb/'.

Historical information

Button distributed to and worn by Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) members and staff as part of a campaign to secure minimum nurse staffing in the public healthcare sector. This badge was accompanied by a booklet 'Nursing the system back to health : Nurse patient ratios 2001', published in April 2002. The booklet describes some of the rationale for minimum staffing ratios and developments in 2000-2001 regarding campaigning for ratios, particular the landmark decision of the Australian Industrial Relations Commission in 2000 that saw the ANF securing the world's first mandated minimum nurse-to-patient ratios. After decades of campaigning from the ANF/ANMF, ratios were legislated for the public sector in Victoria with the passing of the Safe Patient Care (Nurse to Patient and Midwife to Patient) Bill in 2015. The web address on the badge was active from 1999 to 2004, and the shortcut 'anfvic.asn.au' was active from April 2001, suggesting this badge dates from 2001.

Victorian School Nurses special interest group pin

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation, Melbourne

Rectangle-shaped, gold and ivory-coloured pin with green, blue, yellow and black images and text. Pin printed with 'VSN victorian school nurses ANF [Australian Nursing Federation] (Vic[torian] Branch) S.I.G. [special interest group]. Pin includes images of three stick figures of different sizes in green, blue, and yellow.