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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214
Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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330 items with images

Drill Press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Orange drill press with cream wheel

Diamond harrows

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Incomplete (three quarter) set of diamond (spike) harrows untainted metal

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Double ended (large/small) # 209 stamp. Has had welded repair on large end

Inscriptions & Markings

209 SHELDON AXLE COMPANY

Lace Trim piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embrioderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by three generations of Amess women - Jane, Janet and Unity (Bright - donor). Jane was wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

Package contains note: FICCHU c1860/70 (hand made)

lace piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Ring Spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Octagonal ring spanner to go with Essex car, therefore to go with milk cart wheels, see cat # 0158

Potato digger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single row potato digger, with upward prongson digger and depth adjuster at rear. Green/blue with red wheels

Scythe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

scythe with surface rust, no handle, good steel, rough welds on socket, hole for mounting handle (e.g. with screw)

Inscriptions & Markings

TROJAN/264

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Journal of Churchill Island farm expenditure 1941-2

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Journal with red title print and red spine showing farm expenditure 1941-2.

Historical information

Record of farm expenditure, 1941-2 for Churchill Island farm owned by Harry Jenkins 1936-1963.

Significance

Shows historic farm activity on Churchill Island

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made, floral pattern, possibly warratahs?

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Ames... read more

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women.

Winnower

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand operated winnower with handle and hopper unpainted

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Herd notes. Handwritten notes in pencil on paper (lined) with script running across lines, with names and ages of herd.

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artefacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming on Churchill Island and provides information on farming of the era.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Churchill Island Six Pound Cannon

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cannon mounted on wooden carriage with loading shaft.

Historical information

Samuel Amess placed the cannon on Churchill Island, claiming that it had been given to him by Captain Waddell of the Confederate ship Shenandoah in return for hospitailty during the ship's time in Melbourne in 1865. John Cleeland, who built Woolamai House on Phillip Island, claimed that it was firstly given to him. Research into the voyages of the Shenandoah give no evidence for this and suggest it was unlikely to have come from the Shenandoah or its prizes. Investigation by the Victorian Conservation Trust in 1982 to identify the manufacture and provenance of the cannon proved fruitless. A summary of the research evidence and arguments is given in "The Churchill Island Cannon: History and Mystery" by David Maunders on www.friendsofchurchillisland.org.au/xoops/modules (Friends of Churcill Island website).

Inscriptions & Markings

860 FRECK

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

blacksmith made; hand-hammered relief groove. Well used - top mushroomed out.

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

length of lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made lace trim with selvage edge on one side and undulating edge with picots, geometric iinerior

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Double ended spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

stainless steel, some pitting. One end slightly smaller than the other

Corset cover

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "White cotton camisole hand stitched seams. Probably purchased fabric pre 1900".

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Notes handwritten in pencil on paper regarding fertilizer amounts in 100 weight bags per paddock, 11 paddocks. Dated 1959. Assumed to be written by Harry Jenkins

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming on Churchill Island and provides information on farming of the era.

Milk separator

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Silver bowl with red base; some suface rust

Mortise axe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

chisel ended, curved underneath. No handle. Rusted.

Stationary baler

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted, rusted, stationary baler

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood cutting/splitting wedge. Steel. commercially made. Has relief groove.

Historical information

Used by the donor in clearing timber at Olinda and Shady Creek, Victoria. Forms part of a timber clearing tool collection including cross cut saws and Trewhella jack.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Trojan" on side

Wheel hoe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

unpainted wooden handles, surface rust on wheel

Paling/shingle cutting blade

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

well used blacksmith made. No handle

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Pencil notes regarding Churchill Island ownership from 1879 to 1937. Author unknown

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973

Significance

This document provides information regarding Churchill Island ownership.

Inscriptions & Markings

TULLIS BOND MADE IN GREAT BRITAIN [watermark - bottom of page, rear]

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Steel. Complete including spring. No manufacturer. One paint trace.

Small neckpiece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Handmade Maltese silk lace )lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/2012) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Milking Machine Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Aqua engine case, surface rust, with driving wheels

Petrol engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Dark gfreen with surface rust "Underwood" in white lettering on red background on tank.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

LACE TRIM

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace with spotted and floral pattern

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

spoon drill bits X 2

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

For use with woods that splinter. Paint spots. For use in auger.

Inscriptions & Markings

14.5 cm long: NEUMANS GERMANY

Round Crochet pieces x 4

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand - probably bobbin (Lace group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Hand Shears

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Spring double handled hand shears for shearing sheep.

Inscriptions & Markings

"HIND'S PATENT DOUBLE HOLLOW GROUND BURGAN AND BALL PATENT NO. 294 (inside a shield with a crown on top) MADE IN ENGLAND"

Model Ship - Lady Nelson

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

1:24 scale model of the Lady Nelson (c.1801) made from cardboard, wood, cord, string, wool. Carvill Hull black ochre-yellow colour, brown timbers. Masts fawn with black trim and fittings. Lifeboat hull clinker built black and white. White inside, brown floor. Brown oars x 4. Tied onto Lady Nelson deck. LN flags: jack on stern gaff yard, and Royal Naval pennant on peak of rear mast.

Historical information

The Lady Nelson was the first decked ship to enter Western Port at the beginning of 1801, captained by Lt James Grant, who named Churchill Island after a man in Dawlish, Devon who gave him a quantity of a variety of seeds, including wheat, which he sowed on CI. Lady Nelson returned at the end of the year under the command of Murray, who reported that most of the seeds had grown. He harvested the wheat to feed to the swans they had on board for fresh meat. Friends of Churchill Island Society commissioned the building of the model ship from David Lumsden, who built it for FOCIS for the cost of materials.

Significance

See historical information for the significance of the Lady Nelson to Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

"LADY NELSON" on stern white lettering on black.

Eyore New Holland Baler

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Self-propelled baler, "Eyore" Sperry New Holland

Furphy Water Cart

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Furphy water cart, unpainted with traces of red on embossed end

Historical information

Furphy carts were an important item in Australian agriculture, leading to the addition of the word "furphy" a misleading rumour (originally as spread from gossip around the water cart).

Inscriptions & Markings

On side of tank in black paint "CHRURCILL ISLAND" Embossed on end: Furphy water cart; makers Furphy & Sons, Shepparton and other inscriptions.

drainage pipe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Section of terracotta pipe broken at both ends.

Historical information

Found on Churchill Island. Possibly used for dairy drainage?

lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand-made individual bobbin made lace motifs hand sewn together with bobbin made brides. Cream coloured, Some stains,

Historical information

Worn by Jane (Janet) Amess. She and her husband Samuel owned Churchill Island from 1872-1879. Samuel was an Alderman of Melbourne City Council and Mayor in 1870. They used Churchill Island as a holiday retreat and built a substantial weatherboard dwelling there now known as Amess House. The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

This collar is part of a 94 piece collection of small lace items accumulated by four generations of Amess women, starting with Janet Amess in the 1850s.

Extended Mathieson Auger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Damaged wooden handle (not original) bit welded on to metal rod, handle welded on to rod,. Surface rust

Inscriptions & Markings

Mathieson + (illegible)

Dump hay rake

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Red dump hay rake, white wheels, single horse, single row of rakes

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine lace, coarse crochet like thread. One fairly straight edge with picots. Other edge has clusters of elongated picots at even intervals. Geometric pattern inside

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Paper Map

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand drawn map in pencil on paper of situation and measurements of land contained in Vendor's Title. Attached to solicitor's letter catalogue item No. 0108.1

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This document is an example of a hand drawn map of the era, measured in links.

Inscriptions & Markings

[signed] Hen B [bottom right hand corner]

Neck piece with front ruffle attached

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Diary

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Small black diary "Daimler" 1955? Appears to include camera settings for photos including bridge.

Historical information

Notebook containing camera settings of pictures including the bridge.

Seal fur muff

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Scoop

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Mud scoop

Historical information

Recovered from San Remo property.

Inscriptions & Markings

Gaston

length of lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made undulating floral design on net ground

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929