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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214
Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

1 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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330 items with images

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Chaff cutter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand operated chaff cutter, painted green with white scrolling; red cogs

Single furrow mould board plough

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single furrow triangular mould board plough painted green

Baby's bonnet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace. Can display with calico cushion inside. Wash calico first. (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Single furrow mould board plough

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Green framework, single front wheel

10" Spofford Brace

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Iron carpenter's brace, metal handle, rotating knob, thumb screw, rusted

Inscriptions & Markings

ATMIEBON (x) Mathieson

Neck piece with front ruffle attached

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

spoon drill bits X 2

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

For use with woods that splinter. Paint spots. For use in auger.

Inscriptions & Markings

14.5 cm long: NEUMANS GERMANY

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

one of three wedges cut from the same piece of steel. No relief grooves

Historical information

Use in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan

Petticoat

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine braid joined with hand ? or machine ? crochet chain joining (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (3)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Wedding petticoat. Hand crocheted. Handmade button holes. Pure cotton. Machined waist band".

Scarifier hand hoe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden handles, unpainted metal wheel, hoe and fittings

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Box spanner for wire wheels; tapered handle, hanging loop other end to spanner. surface rust

Inscriptions & Markings

Wire Wheel Corp of America Buffalo NY B4-1005/H4.B4.CB4.CB4 5 A

3D Viewer

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood and glass viewer to give three dimensional image from two identical photos placed in slot at other end to eye pieces

Historical information

May have been used by Amess or Jenkins families?

wooden mallet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden mallet with turned grooves around head - 2 double and 1 single. Oak handle. Head has cream paint remnants both sides.

wood splitting wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wedge with groove to prevent sticking. Worn top, burred over

Stilsons

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Adjustable pipe wrench. Thread works. Surface rust, black finish. Commercial manufacture

Bench hand drill

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

White bench hand drill with black wheels and cogs

TIiller

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand pushed two drum tiller, unpainted wooden handle, metal drums

Significance

Unusual object

Churchill Island Six Pound Cannon

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cannon mounted on wooden carriage with loading shaft.

Historical information

Samuel Amess placed the cannon on Churchill Island, claiming that it had been given to him by Captain Waddell of the Confederate ship Shenandoah in return for hospitailty during the ship's time in Melbourne in 1865. John Cleeland, who built Woolamai House on Phillip Island, claimed that it was firstly given to him. Research into the voyages of the Shenandoah give no evidence for this and suggest it was unlikely to have come from the Shenandoah or its prizes. Investigation by the Victorian Conservation Trust in 1982 to identify the manufacture and provenance of the cannon proved fruitless. A summary of the research evidence and arguments is given in "The Churchill Island Cannon: History and Mystery" by David Maunders on www.friendsofchurchillisland.org.au/xoops/modules (Friends of Churcill Island website).

Inscriptions & Markings

860 FRECK

Bed jacket cuff

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cuff from 0086. Motifs hand sewn on to machined net. Bobbin tape on seams (NGV) Princess machine lace. Machine made motifs hand appliqued on (Lace group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12). See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Limerick lace bed jacket Janet Amess 1860 from Kel Bright collection with separated cuff".

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Fillet hand darned pattern on machine net (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

tape measure case

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Leather and brass circular case. No measuring tape inside. Stitched case.

Inscriptions & Markings

JOHN RABONE & SONS BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND. "Cemetary" scratched on back.

Block plane

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wooden smoothing plane with handle. Adjustable via wedge. Borer holes in handle.

Inscriptions & Markings

Ward blade. Plane made by Mathieson & Son Glasgow Best Guaranteed.

Grindstone on metal stand

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Large sandstone grinding stone on metal stand , surfacew rust

Black on cream lace collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

terracotta pipe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

section of terracotta pipe, probably used for drainage.

Historical information

Found on Churchill Island. Possibly used for dairy drainage?

Stationary engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Blue green casing; two belt drive wheels; red wheels. Attached to green chaff cutter

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Incomplete. Bronze saw set with no fittings except striker. Red paint spots.

Inscriptions & Markings

Eclipse No 77. Made in England

lace piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

length of lace, machine made, geometric design with two selvidged edges, repeat motif of ovals surrounded by crosses.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Auger bits X 13

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Surface rust, some paint spots. Sizes stamped on.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

double ended open spanner. One end has angled jaw. Other end rounded (for over shaft) with tabs for locking into place

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made lace trim with both edges similar, v shape design and 8 braid geometric design in centre

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by three generations of Amess women - Jane, Janet and Unity (Bright - donor). Jane was wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island.

Milking Machine Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Aqua engine case, surface rust, with driving wheels

Comet Windmill

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Windmill on metal stand "COMET" painted on silver vane. Restored in 1980s.

Historical information

Comet Windmills was founded in Rockhampton, Queensland in 1879 by Sidney Williams. The Comet became known as "Australia's Leading Mill". The company survived two world wars and three generations of the family and was sold in 1992 and terminated in 1998.

Significance

Probably the oldest working mill of its model in Gippsland

Dining Table Cloth

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Damask dining table cloth, off-white, stitched motifs throughout of leaves and sprays. Hand stitched hem.

Historical information

Owned by Margaret Amess, youngest child of Samuel and Jane Amess. MA gave the cloth to Mary Clay, aunt of donor, who had been MA's maid prior to marriage.

Significance

Owned by Margaret Amess, youngest child of Samuel and Jane Amess. MA gave the cloth to Mary Clay, aunt of donor, who had been MA's maid prior to marriage.

Inscriptions & Markings

Inked black "M Amess" (ss smudged) in one corner.

Dray

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Brown wood, dark red wheels, unpainted shafts. Some decorative wood panelling.

cross cut saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Steel. Designed with bow in middle of blade. Small offset. Original ends in good conditions. No handles.

Single furrow mould board plough

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single furrow mould board plough, handles painted green,silver worn off base of mouldboard

Lace Trim piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made, probably on a Barman (Swiss) machine. (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12).

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Black Lace Front

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Area for head to fit through not cut out. Machine lace - unsure why made like this. Oblong piece of net may be to cut out. (Lace Group, Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12). See photos (3)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Black lace "Front" with neckline hole"

Milk cart

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted wooden milk vendor cart, rubber inflatable tyres ( perished)

Inscriptions & Markings

"Milk Vendor" painted on right side

Swingle trees

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Two horse swingle trees hinged either end of one long swingle tree. Unpainted timber, metal fittings

cross cut saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

single handed cross-cut saw. Peg grip missing?

Inscriptions & Markings

circular brass manufacturer's plate: SPEAR & JACKSON Sheffield. Crown symbol.

cattle ear punch

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Steel. Two handled. Return spring missing. Apple shaped punch

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made pretending to be Valenciennes (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood cutting/splitting wedge. Steel. commercially made. Has relief groove.

Historical information

Used by the donor in clearing timber at Olinda and Shady Creek, Victoria. Forms part of a timber clearing tool collection including cross cut saws and Trewhella jack.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Trojan" on side

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine lace, coarse crochet like thread. One fairly straight edge with picots. Other edge has clusters of elongated picots at even intervals. Geometric pattern inside

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Scythe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

scythe with surface rust, no handle, good steel, rough welds on socket, hole for mounting handle (e.g. with screw)

Inscriptions & Markings

TROJAN/264

Double ended spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

stainless steel, some pitting. One end slightly smaller than the other