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Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven VIC 3925 (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214; 03 5951 2800

Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

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332 items with images

332 items with images

Lace Trim, Section

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made undulating floral design on net ground

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Scythe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cast steel blade. Hole on back and of blade for hanging. Steamed handle (may not be original). Complex pipe/nut washer and five metal shims keeping blade on handle.

Historical information

Donated by Wilfred Dungan on behalf of the Dungan family Collection originally used on the property of the late Dr Rae Dungan in Falls Creek Rd Olinda, purchased in the late 1930s from Olinda pioneers Harry and Minnie Holden. Also on the property of late May Farndon of Farndon’s and Falls Rd Mt Dandenong – aunt of Dr Rae William Dungan and also an early pioneer. Family holidays and weekends involved use of these sorts of farm implements plus working with horses. Post-war, the Olinda hand tools and machinery moved to the Shady Creek, Nilma North area where bush, pasture and cows had replaced the Olinda property. Wilfred well remembers being on one end of the crosscut saws cutting fence posts, logs and timber under “the tireless and vocal instruction” of a red headed local Darnum Rd legend called Harry Collyer. “He drove an old Rugby car and nearly pulled me through the logs with every cut!”

Inscriptions & Markings

From tip: BEST CROWN NATYZACKS STELLAR GR?AS (S) SHEFIELD. Near handle: image of figure on horse.

Moulding plane

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Oak body, rosewood base, steel blade and brass base. Some paint spots. (Doesn't need handle).

Lace Collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand embroidered Limerick style lace (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Limerick Lace Collar"

Hay rake

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Burgundy hay rake, yellow wheels, double row of rakes.

Historical information

More modern than other rake in collection

Adze

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Fairly modern standard adze

Historical information

Hytest is regarded as best Australian brand of axe.

Inscriptions & Markings

Hytest

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Length of wide lace trim with dots on net ground and selvage edge, other edge complex scallop. Machine made

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Bill hook

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Rough pine handle with many borer holes. Commercially made (no ID) cast in socket one end, strap iron riveted other end. Cast blade.

Horseworks

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Horseworks for one or two horses, gearing, shafting and pulley, complete. Used as a power conversion unit via one or two horses to operate a chaff cutter or similar unit. Horseworks is set up outside a building with an underground shaft to a pulley inside the barn

Inscriptions & Markings

Robinson

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Square box spanner with hanging loop at other end. Tapered box. Rust and pitting

Lace Collar, Detachable

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace. Under bodice? Probably made for a specific dress. (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note "Dickie"? machine

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

length of lace, machine made, geometric design with two selvaged edges, repeat motif of ovals surrounded by crosses.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Coping plane

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand made from scrap wood. Hardwood - file has been converted to a blade for making inlays.

Shearing machine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single stand shearing machine on unpainted wooden stand. Painted blue/green with red disc

tennon saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Cast steel blade and walnut handle. Surface rust and some paint spots on blade. "Nonpariel" brand. Elephant trade mark on handle and blade.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Nonpariel" brand. Elephant trade mark on handle and blade. W T Jackson Sheffield.

Cream Separator

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Metal cream separator mounted on red base with bowl, double spouts.

Inscriptions & Markings

Alfa Laval

Lace Trim, Section

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Chemical lace (Lace Group Embrioderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by three generations of Amess women - Jane, Janet and Unity (Bright - donor). Jane was wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

Package contains note: FICCHU c1860/70 (hand made)

Fishing Reel

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Wood and brass (shark?) fishing reel. Probably hand-made. Wound with original cord fishing line. Has separate brass winder handle (see 0296.2)

Historical information

E H "Ted" Jenkins was the paraplegic son of Harry Jenkins who bought Churchill Island in 1936 as an interest for Ted. Ted lived on Churchill Island at various times with his nurse Sr Margaret "Jimmy" Campbell, e.g. second world war when they ran a shorthorn dairy farm, and at other times lived in their home in Melbourne. Ted was keen on 'ham' radio, and had many friends from his school who became life-long friends and frequent visitors to him on Churchill Island.

Significance

This fishing reel and handle are the only objects, apart from photographs, that belonged to Ted Jenkins which are currently in the CI collection (3.12.2014)

Inscriptions & Markings

"E H Jenkins 1943" etched on one side. "Click on" etched on one side.

Furphy Water Cart

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Furphy water cart, unpainted with traces of red on embossed end

Historical information

Furphy carts were an important item in Australian agriculture, leading to the addition of the word "furphy" a misleading rumour (originally as spread from gossip around the water cart).

Inscriptions & Markings

On side of tank in black paint "CHRURCILL ISLAND" Embossed on end: Furphy water cart; makers Furphy & Sons, Shepparton and other inscriptions.

drainage pipe

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Section of terracotta pipe broken at both ends.

Historical information

Found on Churchill Island. Possibly used for dairy drainage?

Eyore New Holland Baler

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Self-propelled baler, "Eyore" Sperry New Holland

Swingle trees

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Two horse swingle trees hinged either end of one long swingle tree. Unpainted timber, metal fittings

Bench hand drill

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

White bench hand drill with black wheels and cogs

Swingle tree and jinker pole

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black pole, double black swingle trees; from Jinker?

Lace Collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Lace Collar with reinforced strips. Machine net and Battenberg lace. Same as 0040 (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (4)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made net with coloured hand embroidery. 1920s from underwear (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12). Cut from larger piece

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

cross cut saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

steel blade, wooden handle and peg grip. Single person saw

Historical information

Donated by Wilfred Dungan on behalf of the Dungan family Collection originally used on the property of the late Dr Rae Dungan in Falls Creek Rd Olinda, purchased in the late 1930s from Olinda pioneers Harry and Minnie Holden. Also on the property of late May Farndon of Farndon’s and Falls Rd Mt Dandenong – aunt of Dr Rae William Dungan and also an early pioneer. Family holidays and weekends involved use of these sorts of farm implements plus working with horses. Post-war, the Olinda hand tools and machinery moved to the Shady Creek, Nilma North area where bush, pasture and cows had replaced the Olinda property. Wilfred well remembers being on one end of the crosscut saws cutting fence posts, logs and timber under “the tireless and vocal instruction” of a red headed local Darnum Rd legend called Harry Collyer. “He drove an old Rugby car and nearly pulled me through the logs with every cut!”

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Sulky wheel left

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

One of pair of matching black sulky wheels with red hubs