Stories Organisations Projects About Login

Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven VIC 3925 (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214; 03 5951 2800

Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

There are no comments yet.

Leave a comment

330 items with images

330 items with images

Stationary engine, red

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Sundial 2 h.p. engine, open crank 600 rpm Seral number 6420, red. Attached to yellow grain grinder

Historical information

Purchased by FOCIS

Significance

Typical of units used on local farms

Inscriptions & Markings

Sunshine McKay, 1925 Serial no. 6420

Sulky

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Restored sulky, 2 ton wheels, burgundy body and shafts, decorative aqua scroll work on rear, black springs, seat deteriorated.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Bed jacket

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Motifs hand sewn on to machined net; bobbin tape on seams (NGV) Princess machine lace machine made motifs hand-appliqued on (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (4) See also 0086 cuff.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note: "Machined lace bed jacket. Janet Amess 1860. From Kel Bright Collection with separated cuff".

Moulding plane

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Oak body, rosewood base, steel blade and brass base. Some paint spots. (Doesn't need handle).

Diary

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Small black diary "Daimler" 1955? Appears to include camera settings for photos including bridge.

Historical information

Notebook containing camera settings of pictures including the bridge.

cross cut saw

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Two handled cross cut saw. One manufactured handle and one bush replacement wedged with three inch nail. 6 broken teeth. Rivets for handle broken off at home-made end. M shaped tooth profile.

Historical information

Donated by Wilfred Dungan on behalf of the Dungan family Collection originally used on the property of the late Dr Rae Dungan in Falls Creek Rd Olinda, purchased in the late 1930s from Olinda pioneers Harry and Minnie Holden. Also on the property of late May Farndon of Farndon’s and Falls Rd Mt Dandenong – aunt of Dr Rae William Dungan and also an early pioneer. Family holidays and weekends involved use of these sorts of farm implements plus working with horses. Post-war, the Olinda hand tools and machinery moved to the Shady Creek, Nilma North area where bush, pasture and cows had replaced the Olinda property. Wilfred well remembers being on one end of the crosscut saws cutting fence posts, logs and timber under “the tireless and vocal instruction” of a red headed local Darnum Rd legend called Harry Collyer. “He drove an old Rugby car and nearly pulled me through the logs with every cut!”

Detachable Lace Collar

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace. Under bodice? Probably made for a specific dress. (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note "Dickie"? machine

Engine

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Green petrol engine with red trim and crank handle. Attached to green grain grinder

Periodical - The Australian Farm & Home, VOL. LI No. 4

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Paper periodical publication 'The Australian Farm & Home', Journal of The Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria, VOL. LI-No.4, April 30, 1942, containing an article 'The Churchill Stud' by Capt. E.W. Dixon

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

Demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and involvement in farming and cattle.

Inscriptions & Markings

'Mrs. Jenkins' [front page, left hand side], 'Printed Matter Only. Mr. Ted Jenkins, Churchill Island via Newhaven', [back cover, left hand side]

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

length of lace trim, off-white colour; hand-made Torchon (duster) lace; used on underwear

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Handwritten notesin pencil on paper, regarding fertilizing farm. Assumed to be written by Harry Jenkins

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and commitment to farming at Churchill Island and provides information on farming of the era.

Tiller

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Burgundy structure with cream wheels seat and white hand brake. Single long unpainted pole

Forge blower

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Forge blower painted red

Paper Solicitor's letter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Typed solicitor's letter from Henderson & Ball Solicitors & Co, to Mr. E.H. Jenkins, 33 Collins St, Melbourne, regarding purchase from G.R. Buckley and Other, and enclosing sketch plan (catalogue item no. 0108.2), dated 11th May 1939, titled "You from G.R. Buckley and Others"

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The letter provides information regarding the purchase of Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

[signed] Henderson & Ball "at 4 1/2 %" [inserted last line, fourth paragraph], "(Purchase Price 2000 pounds)" [end fourth paragraph], "HenB" [bottom first page], "Henderson Ball" [second page}

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made (lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

lace trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made, floral pattern, possibly warratahs?

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Ames... read more

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women.

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

small wedge with substantial chip out of narrow end. Relief groove

Historical information

Used in conjunction with other wood splitting/cutting tools donated by Wilfred Dungan.

Inscriptions & Markings

HYTEST FORGED TOOLS

Milk separator

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Silver bowl with red base; some suface rust

Bridge Notebook

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Small lined notebook, with plstic removable cover with press tud fasten. Contains notes regarding 1959 bridge construction written by Harry Jenkins. Plastic cover navy blue colour.

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

This item demonstrates Harry Jenkins thorough and detailed approach to the maintenance of Churchill Island Farm and construction in the era.

Cheese Press

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Metal cheese press, white

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidery (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2) taken 30/12/11

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis. Keywords janet amess lace collection; lace; churchill island Statement of Significance

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Beaded piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Supper Cloth

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Linen supper cloth with drawn thread 55mm from edge all around, 2 rows of drawn thread with petals 130 mm from edge and 175mm from edge. Drawn thread at corners showing petals and whorls. White. Butterflies embroidered at alternate diagonal corners. Letters "M" and "A" at the other alternate diagonal corners. White embroidery on white linen. Butterfly motif.

Historical information

Supper cloth embroidered by Margaret Amess, youngest child of Samuel and Jane Amess. Margaret Amess gave the supper cloth to Mary Clay, aunt of the donor.

Inscriptions & Markings

"M" "A" in diagonal corners.

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine made lace (Lace group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Baby bonnet

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Strips of machine lace imitating bobbin lace; hand crocheted together. Crocheted rosettes. (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12).

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Packaged with note; "Hand crocheted silk lined baby's bonnet" Lace fabric rayon?

Horseworks

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Horseworks for one or two horses, gearing, shafting and pulley, complete. Used as a power conversion unit via one or two horses to operate a chaff cutter or similar unit. Horseworks is set up outside a building with an underground shaft to a pulley inside the barn

Inscriptions & Markings

Robinson

T Square tool

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

T square made from printer's plate, metal and wood, riveted together with 10 rivets and a hanging hole in top centre of wood.

Historical information

Samuel Amess, who bought Churchill island in 1872 was a Presbyterian Scot as also was James Balfour. There may have been a personal link.

Inscriptions & Markings

One side, metal: Balfour, Elliott and Company Limited/ Incorporated under the Companies Statute 1884 /20 Queen St MELBOURNE / Capital L250,000 in 250,000 shares of L1 each / This is to certify that... / is the property of .../ Part of circle printing in join with wood and scroll work on metal at join. Other side: scratched in "H R Balfour"

Handwritten notes on paper

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Pencil notes regarding Churchill Island ownership from 1879 to 1937. Author unknown

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973

Significance

This document provides information regarding Churchill Island ownership.

Inscriptions & Markings

TULLIS BOND MADE IN GREAT BRITAIN [watermark - bottom of page, rear]