Stories Organisations Projects About Login

Churchill Island Heritage Farm Newhaven, Victoria

Churchill Island Heritage Farm covers 57 hectares and boasts a historic working farm with ‘hands on’ farming demonstrations reminiscent of a bygone era. Sheep shearing, cow milking and working dog demonstrations run every day except Christmas day and are included in the entry fee. Carriage rides operate during school holidays and special events. Churchill Island is easily accessible by an all-vehicle bridge from Phillip Island.First walked by Bunurong/Boonwurrung Aboriginal people, the island has an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. There are also restored historic buildings from the 1860s and 1870s, lovely gardens, ancient Moonah trees, wetlands, a visitor’s centre and a licensed café.

The Island forms part of the Churchill Island Marine National park and the waters and mudflats surrounding Churchill Island are listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Two island circuit tracks offers magnificent views across Western Port Bay and provide excellent bird viewing (Royal Spoonbills, Pied Oyster Catchers, ibis, gulls, herons and pelicans). There are also views of Tortoise Head and French Island. The whole island is heritage listed with Heritage Victoria and the buildings are classified by the National Trust.

Links

Contact Information

location
246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven VIC 3925 (map)
phone
+61 03 5956 7214; 03 5951 2800

Contact

Opening Hours

Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Entry Fee

Adults (16yrs+) $12.25 Children (4-15yrs) $6.15 Australian Pensioner(ID required) $8.55 Family (2A +2C) $30.65

Location

246 Samuel Amess Drive Newhaven Victoria

View on Google Maps

This collection forms the basis for the operations of Churchill Island Heritage Farm, which is located on Churchill Island, where in 1801, during a survey of Western Port Bay, Lieutenant James Grant built a cottage, cleared land and planted the first wheat and corn crops grown in Victoria, using seeds provided by John Churchill. The working farm features a homestead, built by Samuel Amess, a one-time mayor of Melbourne who purchased the island in 1872, together with cottages built by John Rogers in the 1860s and associated outbuildings. As well as the heritage buildings, the collection includes agricultural machinery, implements, and tools, special collections of farm engines and dairy equipment, and historical photographs. The collection is managed by Churchill Island Heritage Farm curator.

Significance

This collection documents early Victorian rural life and agriculture, and the history of the site where crops were first grown in Victoria in 1801; includes also information on the various owners of the island and Government ownership from 1970s.

There are no comments yet.

Leave a comment

401 items

401 items

Newspaper double page spread - "The Isle of History..."

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

pp. 36-37 of The Sun Friday August 13 1976. Text by Danny Gocs, 6 photos by Bill Tindale. Re: 13 architecture students and lecturer Lisle Rudolph sketching, measuring and recording buildings for Victorian Conservation Trust.

Inscriptions & Markings

Lead pencil tick at box "Pictures: Bill Tindale". Purple texta diagonal line in top left hand corner p. 36.

Essay - "The Most Unforgettable Person I Have Ever Met"

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

2 quarto page, blue ink handwritten English essay 1969. Mentone Girls Grammar School. Teacher: Miss Docherty. Re: Harry Jenkins, owner of Churchill Island 1930s-60s. By Margaret Stott.

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

large box spanner #2 cast; socket for extension. Shows screw marks from casting

Inscriptions & Markings

W E CARY LTD

Iron wheel

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Unpainted iron whell designed for heavy loads

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine embroidered (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1.3.12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

Label stuck on one end "4 1/2"

Stilsons

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Adjustable pipe wrench. Thread works. Surface rust, black finish. Commercial manufacture

Sketch book of Minnie Laurence

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black cover 124pp; 54 with pencil or pen and ink drawings. 1 cut-away page of writing. 2 drawings inside back cover. Spine deteriorated and many pages loose.

Historical information

Some of Minnie's sketches from this sketch book used by Pat Baird in her book "Churchill Island History and Her Story" (copyright for this book with Friends of Churchill Island (FOCIS)).

Inscriptions & Markings

"M.L. M.S.A."

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Broad machine made lace trim with wavy pattern

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Grain hopper/grinder

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Yellow wooden hopper on black grinder with blue parts mounted on green stand. Attached by belt drive to Sundial engine

Crochet Square

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand Crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photo

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Letter

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Typed letter on Department of Agriculture, Victoria letterhead, addressed to Mr. E.H. Jenkins, regarding improvement of pasture land at Churchill Island, signed 'R.L. Twentyman,' Agrostologist, dated 9th April, 1941

Historical information

Dr Harry Jenkins owned Churchill Island from 1936 to 1963 and bequeathed it to Margaret Campbell on his death. Sister Campbell had been nurse to his disabled son and wife and she lived on the island from the time of World War Two. The item was given to Arthur Evans, a family friend, on the day of the auction sale of artifacts when she sold the island, approximately 1973.

Significance

The document demonstrates Harry Jenkins interest and committment to farming and provides information on farming of the era.

Inscriptions & Markings

R.L. Twentyman [bottom right hand corner]

Model Ship - Lady Nelson

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

1:24 scale model of the Lady Nelson (c.1801) made from cardboard, wood, cord, string, wool. Carvill Hull black ochre-yellow colour, brown timbers. Masts fawn with black trim and fittings. Lifeboat hull clinker built black and white. White inside, brown floor. Brown oars x 4. Tied onto Lady Nelson deck. LN flags: jack on stern gaff yard, and Royal Naval pennant on peak of rear mast.

Historical information

The Lady Nelson was the first decked ship to enter Western Port at the beginning of 1801, captained by Lt James Grant, who named Churchill Island after a man in Dawlish, Devon who gave him a quantity of a variety of seeds, including wheat, which he sowed on CI. Lady Nelson returned at the end of the year under the command of Murray, who reported that most of the seeds had grown. He harvested the wheat to feed to the swans they had on board for fresh meat. Friends of Churchill Island Society commissioned the building of the model ship from David Lumsden, who built it for FOCIS for the cost of materials.

Significance

See historical information for the significance of the Lady Nelson to Churchill Island.

Inscriptions & Markings

"LADY NELSON" on stern white lettering on black.

Single furrow mould board plough

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single furrow mould board plough, handles painted green,silver worn off base of mouldboard

Bonnet, Baby

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Machine lace. Can display with calico cushion inside. (Lace Group Embroiderers' Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Trophy

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Round wooden slab, bark on, polished on 1/2 slab base. Nice small gold shields 2003 - 2008 (6) inscribed with Churchill Island Working Horse Festivals Sheep to Shawl competition team winners. Rectangular gold with black lettering: "CHURCHILL ISLAND SHEEP TO SHAWL CHALLENGE" at base.

Inscriptions & Markings

Each shield has the year and team winners names. Rectangular gold with black lettering: "CHURCHILL ISLAND SHEEP TO SHAWL CHALLENGE" at base.

Hand painted cup 1 of 3

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Tea cup with gold border at rim and gold handle. Hand painted with three swallows by Margaret Amess.

Historical information

Margaret Amess was the youngest child of Samuel and Jane Amess, who first purchased Churchill Island in 1872. Margaret Amess was renowned for her china painting.

Inscriptions & Markings

"M.A./1909"

Screwdriver

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Black wooden handle, surface rust; paint worn off handle

wedge

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

wood cutting/splitting wedge. Steel. commercially made. Has relief groove.

Historical information

Used by the donor in clearing timber at Olinda and Shady Creek, Victoria. Forms part of a timber clearing tool collection including cross cut saws and Trewhella jack.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Trojan" on side

Potato digger

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Single row potato digger with upward prongs on digger and depth adjuster at rear. Green/blue with red wheels

Significance

Unusual piece

Hay rake

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Burgundy hay rake, yellow wheels, double row of rakes.

Historical information

More modern than other rake in collection

Horse drawn grader

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Horse drawn grader, metal, painted yellow, unpainted long pole

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Hand crochet (Lace Group Embroiderers Guild 1/3/12) See photos (2)

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

saw set

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Incomplete. Bronze saw set with no fittings except striker. Red paint spots.

Inscriptions & Markings

Eclipse No 77. Made in England

Lace Piece

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

length of lace, machine made, geometric design with two selvaged edges, repeat motif of ovals surrounded by crosses.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Auction Advertising Booklet - "Historic Churchill Island. Westernport Bay."

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

6 inside pages plus front and back cover. Pinkish tinge, black print. Photos, map, text - typed and handwritten. For Churchill Island auction by Sister Margaret Campbell Saturday June 2nd 2:30PM 1973. Agent: Alex Scott and Co. P/L.

Inscriptions & Markings

"CAFFYN" on front cover top right

Box spanner

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Square box spanner with hanging loop at other end. Tapered box. Rust and pitting

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Length white lace trim with selvaged and scalloped edge with picots at outer edge. Undulating pattern on net ground. Machine made.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Note

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

See photocopy. Packaged with items 0011 to 0019

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.

Inscriptions & Markings

"To whom it may concern:- my apologies for this jumble. It is just as it was left to me and i have no knowledge as to whether there is anything of interest or not. Please do as you see fit with it. U Bright."

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

machine made off-white length of lace trim with zig-zag and flower motif and scalloped picot edge.

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929

Lace Trim

Churchill Island Heritage Farm, Newhaven

Irish crochet handmade lace trim, ivory

Historical information

The names of the Amess women who owned the lace are: Jane Amess (nee Straughan) – donor Unity’s great grandmother (pet name Janet, but not used as it will confuse with Unity’s mother). Jane was the wife of Samuel Amess, first Samuel Amess to own Churchill Island. Frances Amess (nee Turnbull) – grandmother, married Robert Lisle Straughan Amess, 4th child of Samuel and Jane Janet Jickell (nee Amess) – mother, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis, married James Jickell Unity Mary Bright (nee Jickell) was the donor, 2nd of two children of Robert and Francis.

Significance

The Amess family owned Churchill Island from 1872 to 1929. This lace collection was owned and contributed to by four generations of Amess women, see above.