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Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village Warrnambool, Victoria

The Shipwreck Coast of Victoria has a rich maritime history. The spectacular coastline is the final resting place of over 180 wrecks along our beautiful and wild coastline.

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village is both a museum with Australia's richest shipwreck collection and an 1870's village located on the state heritage listed and still operating Lady Bay Lighthouse precinct. The village provide a glimpse into the maritime lifestyles and trades of the 1870's era, the peak of Australia's maritime heritage.

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Contact Information

location
89 Merri St Warrnambool Victoria 3280 (map)
phone
+61 03 5559 4600

Contact

Opening Hours

9am - Late Daily 7 Day per Week

Entry Fee

By Day - Museum: $18.00 adult, $14.50 concession, $8.50 child, $48.00 family. By Night - Shipwrecked Sound and Laser Experience: Adults $30, Concession $27, Child $15.95, Family $77

Location

89 Merri Street Warrnambool Victoria

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Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village collection holds over 10,000 items.

Our focus is centered around early Victorian shipwreck and settlement artefacts from 1850 - 1940.

Our most significant item is the Loch Ard Peacock which is a minton earthernware majolica glazed peacock that survived the shipwreck of the Loch Ard. Other items of interest in our collection include the Carmichael Watch, the ships bells from numerous Shipwrecks, cannons and the Schomberg Diamond Ring.

Ongoing work continues to better understand our collection and we welcome comments you may have on any items you see. We are not experts and will value your contribution.

PLEASE NOTE WE ARE NOT A VALUATION SERVICE AND WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ADVISE YOU OF ANY VALUES ON YOUR ITEMS.

Significance

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village's collection of items is significant as it is the largest collection of shipwreck artefacts to be held in Victoria. The value of the collection is also important due to the provenance of many of the items, their social significance as well as their rarity.

Cr Jacinta Ermacora, Mayor of Warrnambool 24 July 2011 2:57 PM

Thanks Peter, The Victorian Community Collections Project is a ground breaking project and will prove invaluable for heritage preservation on behalf of our community here in Warrnambool. Please pass on my appreciation to the volunteers and staff involved in the project

Peter Abbott 31 January 2013 11:54 PM

Great archive of items. Well done to volunteers who have developed this rich collection and ways to view it. Can not wait to see more.

Margaret 14 October 2013 9:27 AM

Is it me? Finding a lot of the photographs are not coming up on view. Are there gremlins in the system or?? Great idea - will check back again.

Helen Sheedy 17 October 2013 3:35 PM

Thanks for your comment Margaret. yes there are a number of photos that did not load in the mass upload computer. Our volunteer team is busily working away to get as many of these online at the moment. As you can imagine it is an enormous task checking through all 7000 items. If there is an item in particular you would like to view let me know and I can alert the team to ensure the photo is loaded asap.

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37 items with documents

37 items

Post Office Receiving Pillar

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Post Office Receiving Pillar, or letterbox.1885 “High Door Round” design. Tall cast iron cylinder with decorative dome cap with crown on top. Side has a slot and a hinged door with handle shaped as a fist. Painted red with gold trim. “POST OFFICE / RECEIVING PILLAR” lettering cast into cylinder. Restored in 1980 and once again operating as an Australia Post mailbox. Commemorative plague on pillar.

Historical information

This Post Office Receiving Pillar was restored in 1980 and is now a fully operational Australia Post mailbox. In early August 1980 Prime Minister Mr. Fraser posted Warrnambool’s first commemorative envelope into this restored Post Office Receiving Pillar at Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village. The special limited edition envelopes are numbered 1 – 7000. When posted, the envelopes would have the Flagstaff Hill Logo and Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village’s own postmark of a ship’s steering wheel surrounding a lighthouse and a sailing ship, and were dated August 3 on the First Day Cover. Amongst Flagstaff Hill’s collection is that very first letter posted by Prime Minister Fraser. HISTORY OF POST OFFICE RECEIVING PILLARS In 1851 ‘pillar boxes’ were installed at roadside locations in the island of Jersey, England; they had already been successful in several European countries. The use of new prepaid, adhesive postage stamps as well as the roadside pillar boxes meant there was no need for the public to take a trip to the Post Office just to post a letter. By 1855 London had installed its first six Pillar Boxes. In 1856 the pillar boxes were first introduced in Sydney. These were circular with a crown on the dome, supported by leaves. Early Victoria Mail was originally collected by ‘letter carriers’, first appointed in Melbourne in 1841, equipped with leather bag and hand bell. He wore a red coat with brass buttons and a black top hat! In 1844 two wooden receiving boxes were erected in Melbourne. The first cast iron boxes were installed in South Melbourne (Emerald Hill) and were still in service until 1967. They were a fluted circular design and made in England. In the early 1860’s the ‘low door round’ design posting box was introduced, being circular and surrounded by a crown, with two broad embossed bands around its circumference. The clearance door was in front of the box and low down. These were made in Australia. In the early 1870’s square boxes with a tapering top were being used. These too were made in Australia by different manufacturers with slight variations on style such as the orientation and number of slots. Next came the circular boxes again, similar to the ‘low door round’ but with the clearance door extending to just below the posting slot, often referred to as ‘high door round’. These boxes did not have embossed bands. In 1887 small cast iron boxes were introduced, attached to posts and poles and called ‘lamp post receivers’. Around 1930 a ‘London’ model was used in Victoria. It was copied from the flat-domed type in London but made in Tasmania. [References: Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village records, The Warrnambool Standard, August 1st, 1980, “Stamps.Au” http://www.stampsau.com, 4th April 2011 (Extracted from “Australian Street Posting Boxes” by Ken Sparks – out of print)]

Inscriptions & Markings

“POST OFFICE / RECEIVING PILLAR” lettering cast into cylinder. Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum – Port of Warrnambool. This letter receiver was officially commissioned on 3rd August 1980 by the Prime Minister of Australia, the Right Honourable Malcolm Fraser M.P. on completion of 25 years’ service as the Federal Minister for Wannon.”

Pulley

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

This item is an oval-shaped brown and orange wooden shell from a ship’s pulley. The original wooden material is now petrified but the lighter coloured concentric rings of the wood's grain are still visible. A metal sheave or drum is fitted into the centre hole and some of the edge of its sheave’s collar has corroded and broken away. The collar has three holes of equal size that are evenly spaced around it. The bearing ring is now detached but still connected to the pulley with a string on which a label is attached. Most of the six cylindrical metal roller bearings are sand encrusted but some are still visible.

Historical information

Wooden pulley wheel section from the wreck “Newfield”. The Newfield was a three-masted iron and steel barque, built in Dundee, Scotland, in 1889 by Alexander Stephen and Sons. It was owned by the Newfield Ship Company in 1890 and later that year It was registered in Liverpool to owners Brownells and Co. The Newfield left Sharpness, Scotland, on 28th May 1892 with a crew of 25 under the command of Captain George Scott and on 1st June left Liverpool. She was bound for Brisbane, Australia, with a cargo of 1850 tons of fine rock salt, the main export product of Sharpness. At about 9pm on 28th August 1892, in heavy weather, Captain Scott sighted, between heavy squalls, the Cape Otway light on the mainland of Victoria but, due to a navigational error (the ship’s chronometers were wrong), he assumed it to be the Cape Wickham light on King Island, some 40 miles south. He altered his course to the north, expecting to enter Bass Strait. The ship was now heading straight for the south west Victorian coast and at about 1:30am ran aground on a reef about 100 yards from shore and one mile east of Curdie’s Inlet, Peterborough. The ship struck heavily three times before grounding on an inner shoal with 6 feet of water in the holds. Rough sea made the job of launching lifeboats very difficult. The first two lifeboats launched by the crew were smashed against the side of the ship and some men were crushed or swept away. The third lifeboat brought eight men to shore. It capsized when the crew tried to return it to the ship for further rescue The Port Campbell rocket crew arrived and fired four rocket lines, none of which connected with the ship. A local man, Peter Carmody, volunteered to swim one mile to the ship with a line to guide the fourth and final lifeboat safely to shore. Seventeen men survived the shipwreck but the captain and eight of his crew perished. The Newfield remained upright on the reef with sails set for a considerable time as the wind slowly ripped the canvas to shreds and the sea battered the hull to pieces. The Marine Board inquiry found the wreck was caused by a "one man style of navigation" and that the Captain had not heeded the advice of his crew. According to Jack Loney ‘… when the drama was over . . the Newfield was deserted except for the Captain’s dog and two pigs.’ Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum has several artefacts that have been salvaged from the wreck. See also other items in the Flagstaff Hill Newfield Collection.

Significance

The report from SHP documented the following in regards to the Newfield collection: Flagstaff Hill’s collection of artefacts from the Newfield is of historical and archaeological significance at a State level, because of its association with the shipwreck, which is on the Victorian Heritage Register. The collection is significant because of its relationship between the objects. The Newfield collection is archaeologically significant as it is the remains of an international cargo ship. The Newfield collection is historically significant for representing aspects of Victoria’s shipping history and its potential to interpret sub-theme 1.5 (Living with natural processes). The collection is also historically significant for its association with the shipwreck. The Newfield collection meets the following criteria for assessment: Criteria A: Importance to the course, or pattern, of Victoria’s cultural history Criteria B: Possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Victoria’s cultural history Criteria C: Potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of Victoria’s cultural history

Inscriptions & Markings

The pulley has a string through it that attaches it to the bearing. The label on the string bears the handwritten words “PULLEY WHEEL / NEWFIELD / PETER ROLAND”.

Skylight frame

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Skylight frame. The glass pane is missing. Heavily encrusted brass framework. 8 bolts around the long side. 4 bars of metal forming 2 ‘v’ shapes across the centre, slightly concave towards the inner side. The shorter ends of the frame each have a ‘U’ shaped bracket attached in the centre. The shorter ends are wider on one end and taper towards the other end to about a quarter of the thickness.

Historical information

This skylight frame would have been fitted on the Newfield’s poop deck (or raised deck that forms the roof of a cabin at the aft or rear of the ship). It would have covered and protected a glass pane that allowed light to enter the area below desk. The glass pane from the skylight is missing. The Newfield was a three-masted iron and steel barque, built in Dundee, Scotland, in 1889 by Alexander Stephen and Sons. It was owned by the Newfield Ship Company in 1890 and later that year It was registered in Liverpool to owners Brownells and Co. The Newfield left Sharpness, Scotland, on 28th May 1892 with a crew of 25 under the command of Captain George Scott and on 1st June left Liverpool. She was bound for Brisbane, Australia, with a cargo of 1850 tons of fine rock salt, the main export product of Sharpness. At about 9pm on 28th August 1892, in heavy weather, Captain Scott sighted, between heavy squalls, the Cape Otway light on the mainland of Victoria but, due to a navigational error (the ship’s chronometers were wrong), he assumed it to be the Cape Wickham light on King Island, some 40 miles south. He altered his course to the north, expecting to enter Bass Strait. The ship was now heading straight for the south west Victorian coast. At about 1:30am the Newfield ran aground on a reef about 100 yards from shore and one mile east of Curdie’s Inlet, Peterborough. The ship struck heavily three times before grounding on an inner shoal with 6 feet of water in the holds. Rough sea made the job of launching lifeboats very difficult. The first two lifeboats launched by the crew were smashed against the side of the ship and some men were crushed or swept away. The third lifeboat brought eight men to shore. It capsized when the crew tried to return it to the ship for further rescue The rescue was a difficult operation. The Port Campbell Rocket Crew arrived and fired four rocket lines, none of which connected with the ship. Peter Carmody, a local man, volunteered to swim about one mile off shore to the ship with a line to guide the fourth and final lifeboat safely to shore. He was assisted by James McKenzie and Gerard Irvine. Seventeen men survived the shipwreck but the captain and eight of his crew perished. The Newfield remained upright on the reef with sails set for a considerable time as the wind slowly ripped the canvas to shreds and the sea battered the hull to pieces. The Marine Board inquiry found the wreck was caused by a "one man style of navigation" and that the Captain had not heeded the advice of his crew. According to Jack Loney ‘… when the drama was over . . the Newfield was deserted except for the Captain’s dog and two pigs.’ Peter Carmody was awarded the Bramley-Moore medal by the Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society for Saving Life at Ssea, which he received by mail on January 21st 1893. The Skylight joins other items in the Newfield collection.

Significance

Flagstaff Hill’s collection of artefacts from the Newfield is significant for its association with the shipwreck Newfield, which is listed on the Victorian Heritage Registry. The collection is significant because of the relationship between the objects. The Newfield collection is archaeologically significant as the remains of an international cargo ship. The Newfield collection is historically significant for representing aspects of Victoria’s shipping history and its association with the shipwreck.

Trophy

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Trophy silver, with lid, on square, two-tiered timber base, displaying award shields. This is the Sir W. Clarke’s Trophy, for the Victorian Militia Garrison Artillery, first presented in 1886. Large, elaborately decorated, silver bowl with conical shaped pedestal, two handles on top edge of bowl, matching fitted lid; much of the decoration is three dimensional. The fine, detailed decoration includes a semi-kneeling figure with upturned face on top of lid, vine-like handles resting on necks of swans with outspread wings, figures seated on ridge, two on each side, with ends of limbs hanging over the ridge, two holding lyres, patterns of leaves, flowers and draped ribbons. Base is painted black on the outside, has engraved silver shields around its sides with inscriptions of trophy winners. There is a hand written, pencil inscription “1887”under timber base. Trophy is on loan from the Australian Army.

Historical information

This silver trophy is named “Sir W. Clarke’s Trophy” after its donor. Sir William John Clarke, Baronet, who was an esteemed and generous citizen and philanthropist, well known in Melbourne and throughout Victoria. He gave donations to many public projects including Melbourne University and was a patron of many and varied sports. He encouraged the defence services with prizes for competitions among both military and naval forces. In colonial Australia in the 1880’s there was an increase in the size of the colonial military forces, rising from 8,000 in 1883 to 22, 000 in 1885. In 1885 there was a return of unpaid volunteer soldiering, along with a fear of a Russian attack on Australia. The Sir W.J. Clarke’s Trophy was given as a prize in 1885 to Victorian Militia Garrison Battery competition winners, for artillery firing target accuracy in the then colony of Victoria. On Saturday 12th December 1885 the conclusion of the first artillery competition for Sir W. Clarke’s Trophy was held at the Williamstown battery. Competitors over previous weeks were South Grant, Harbor Trust, Warrnambool, South Melbourne (late Footscray), North Melbourne and Geelong, where each man “strove to do his military best”. The first winner of the Sir W. Clarke’s Trophy was the Geelong Garrison Battery, with the prize Sir W. Clark’s Trophy presented to them in 1886. An announcement was made the following year in the Geelong Advertiser; “The very elaborate cup or vase given for competition among the riflemen members of the Victorian Militia by Sir W. J. Clarke, and.won.by the Geelong Artillerymen, was on exhibition in the window of Messrs Bright and Hitchcocks' establishment, Moorabool Street, on Saturday evening. Alongside the massive and handsome trophy was a framed picture containing the photographs of the men who were successful in winning the trophy for the first time.” In 1887 Warrnambool Garrison Artillery, under the command of Major W.S. Helpman, was the proud winner of the Sir W. Clarke’s Trophy. A Government report outlined the benefits of the competitions held to procure the esteemed prize “The annual competitions for the trophies and prizes presented by Sir W. Clarke and Lieut. Colonel Sargood have been keenly contested throughout the Service, and have been productive of much good. Those for the Garrison Artillery have been greatly improved by the introduction of a target which is a fair representation of the mark which would be presented to a battery by a ship attacking it.” The Clarke Trophy contest was held at Point Gellibrand. The trophy was formally unveiled at the Warrnambool orderly-room on 3rd August 1887. The major (Mr. Helpman) addressed the men, expressing a hope that the garrison would do all in their power to keep so handsome a trophy. The garrison were invited to partake of refreshments by the mayor after the parade. In May 1889 the Portland Guardian reported that “the Warrnambool militiamen have again proved their superiority in gunnery in competing for Sir W. J. Clarke's handsome trophy. The effective shooting, faultless drill, and general smartness displayed by the local detachments in handling the big guns at Williamstown on Wednesday last called forth special commendation from the Commandant and other officers on the ground, and the result was from the first looked upon as a moral for the Western district representatives. Although no official returns are yet available, it is certain from what can be learned of the performances of the other batteries in the competition that Warrnambool again wins by a large number of points.” In June 1892 the annual competition was held at the Gellibrand battery in Williamstown. The canvas targets were moored at sea and fired upon from three breech-loading guns mounted on disappearing carriages. Each team was allowed 4 shots fired from each of the 3 guns. An article in the Portland Guardian stated that “the final result will not be known until some time this week, when the canvas from off the target is examined in the presence of umpires and fort commanders but … the Warrnambool team is certainly looked upon as the certain winners.” The same article reported that In this particular year the Government withdrew its previous award of 10 pound cash to the men of the winning team, described in the Portland Guardian as “one of the petty economies of the Government”. The Warrnambool Militia Garrison Artillery did win the Trophy, now for the third time, and because of this they became Absolute Possessors of the prize. On 11th August 2016, in a well-attended ceremony at Flagstaff Hill, the Australian Army handed over custodianship of two very significant historical items - the 1885 W. Clarke Trophy and the 1861 Warrnambool Ladies Silver Bugle – to Warrnambool City Council, and Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, who proudly received them. Both the W. Clarke Trophy and the silver bugle are strongly connected to the Warrnambool Garrison, a Victorian State Heritage Listed site at Flagstaff Hill. [REFERENCES: 1887 Victoria, Report of the Council of Defence; Colonial forces in Australia, Wikipedia; Competition for the Sir William Clarke Trophy, Portland Guardian, 8-6-1892; Firing Competition, Geelong Advertiser, 15-12-1885; Sudden death of Sir W.J. Clarke, Bart., Kalgoorlie Western Argus, 20th May 1897; The Clarke Trophy, Argus Melbourne, 3-8-1887; The very elaborate cup, Geelong Advertiser, 26-7-1886; Warrnambool Militiamen, Portland Guardian, 24-5-1889]

Significance

The Silver Trophy is locally significant to the community of Warrnambool for its connection to the Warrnambool Volunteer Rifle Corps., which formed part of the original Warrnambool Garrison to protect the Warrnambool Harbour. The site of the 1888 Warrnambool Garrison and Fortifications is Victorian State Heritage Listed significant for its intact and operational nature, and is one of the best preserved pieces of Victoria’s early colonial heritage.

Inscriptions & Markings

Trophy’s front, left shield; “1886 / WON BY / GEELONG / GARRISON BATTERY / Major J PRICE / COMMANDING OFFICER” Trophy’s front, centre large shield; “VICTORIAN MILITIA / GARRISON ARTILLERY / SIR W. CLARKE’S / TROPHY” Trophy’s front, right shield; ” -1887- / WON BY / WARRNAMBOOL GARRISON ARTILLERY / Major W.S. Helpman / COMMANDING OFFICER” Trophy’s back, left shield: “1888 / WON BY / NORTH MELBOURNE / Garrison Battery / Major F.R.Y. Goldstein / Commanding Officer” Trophy’s back, centre shield; “1889 / WON BY / WARRNAMBOOL / Garrison Battery / Major W.S. Helpman / Commanding Officer” Trophy’s back, right shield; “1890 / WON BY / HARBOUR TRUST BATTERY / Major J.H. Haydon / Commanding Officer” Trophy’s back, centre shield; “1891 / WON BY / WILLIAMSTOWN BATTERY /l Major W.H. Hall / Commanding Officer” Trophy’s right; left shield; “1892 / WON BY / WARRNAMBOOL / Garrison Battery / Major WS Helpman / Commanding Officer” In pencil underneath timber base “1887”

Type Caster

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Trader Horn Type Caster, used for making new type when required.

Vessel

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Vessel, the ‘Viator’, an historic Victorian ‘couta boat, handmade by renowned boat builder J.R. Jones of Williamstown, c.1890-1920. Single masted carvel vessel with a wooden hull and a pivoting centreboard and is likely to have had gaff rigging. The keel was constructed from red gum, the stern and stern posts were jarrah, and the planking and ribs were New Zealand Kauri. Viator is listed on the Australian Register of Historical Vessels (ARHV Number: HV000561)

Historical information

The Viator, a Victorian ‘couta boat, was built by renowned boat builder J.R. Jones of Williamstown, Melbourne between 1890 and 1920. Its keel was red gum, stern and stern posts were jarrah, and the hull’s planking and ribs were New Zealand Kauri. The son of J.R. Jones (J.B. Jones) was also a ‘couta boat builder. Viator served as a ‘couta fishing boat in the Warrnambool area until the mid-1930’s. Before then it may also have been used for fishing in the Apollo Bay and Queenscliff region. It seems that Viator also sailed the mail run between Port Phillip Bay and Apollo Bay. Viator then served as a mail boat across to Portland, and later as a fishing and recreation boat for local families. For years Viator sat in a paddock in East Warrnambool until purchased in 1975 and donated to Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, where she is the most significant boat in the museum’s fleet. ‘COUTA BOATS The ‘couta design for vessels is believed to have originated at Port Phillip, Victoria, for the purpose of the Barracouta (‘couta) fishing industry, being both fast and seaworthy. J.R. Jones was one of the early builders of craft with this design. The Viator is a rare example of the ‘couta craft from the early days that were sailed by fishermen for many years. It is carvel planked, has an open cockpit, a vertical stem and straight Keel, single mast and a pivoting centreboard. These features are all characteristics of an early Bass Strait ‘couta boat, as confirmed by experienced Victorian couta boat restorer Tim Phillips. OWNERS The Viator was registered Port Fairy in 1940 and owned by G.J. Richards. It was also registered in Port Fairy 1941-1945 and owned by Jens “Peter” Petersen. “Brusher” Richards of Warrnambool and Port Fairy used it for fishing during the 1950’s. Peter Watson and his son also went fishing in Viator. Frank Ferrier, boat builder (and son of William Ferrier, hero for rescue of La Bella shipwreck survivors), also owned the Viator at one stage. Arthur Rogers owned Viator too. He sold it to Terry Pridmore and Wayne Moorefield. John Lindsay had been told that the Viator was stored in a paddock in Fairmont Avenue, Warrnambool, where it was gradually deteriorating. After discussing this with the Manager of Flagstaff Hill, Peter Ronald, John arranged to purchase the vessel at a very reasonable price from Pridmore in 1975. John Lindsay then donated Viator to Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village. In its very early days it was fondly referred to as “the old mail boat”. RESTORATION Shipwright Erik Mikkelsen soon started restoration on the Viator by after it arrived at Flagstaff Hill in 1975. (A photograph published by The Standard May 29, 1975 shows Erik Mikkelson working on the decking, watched by John Lindsay (Planning Board Chairman), Don Maxwell (Tourism Officer) and Leon Habel (Works Supervisor). Another photograph published by The Standard August 9, 1973, shows Arthur Hoey (Shipping Supervisor) working on a mast mounting. ) Maritime Museums of Australia awarded a grant in 2006 to Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village to assist with the restoration and renovation of the Viator. IMAGES Six colour photographs are available showing the Viator the 1970’s; two are of the Viator in Port Fairy in 1971, the other four are of the Viator at the Warrnambool Breakwater in 1972 after preparing her to sail. Other photographs published in The Standard in 1975 and 1976 show the restoration process underway.

Significance

The Viator received Heritage status with the Australia Maritime Museums Council in 2006 and is listed on the Australian Register of Historical Vessels (ARHV Number: HV000561) The Viator is of Local, State and National significance as one of the oldest remaining Victorian Barracouta boats. It is an early and rare example of this type of craft, one of the last local ‘couta boat. Due to its age, it is the most significant vessel in the fleet at Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, according to Julie Winzar, Warrnambool City Council, June 2007.

Inscriptions & Markings

Marked "Viator"

Window

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool

Stained glass leadlight window in Gothic arched metal frame with 6 horizontal reinforcing rods. Image depicts a golden flat-bowled baptismal font on a slender stand with foliage proceeding from it. The image is internally framed by a Roman arch of coloured glass and surrounding rectangular and breaking-wave shapes. (It was previously known locally as the Dr. Connell Memorial Window.)

Historical information

This religiously themed window is situated in the western (weather) wall of St. Nicholas Mission to Seamen’s Church building in the Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village. It was crafted circa 1928. ABOUT THE WINDOW Originally known as the Dr. Connell Memorial Window, it was the feature of an external wall adjacent to the Women’s and Children’s Wards of the Warrnambool Hospital. Dr. Egbert Connell was one of a generation of Honorary Doctors to take a significant role in the operation of the Hospital in the years from 1900 to 1939. The green glass plate with black text has the inscription dedicating the window to Dr. Connell. This registered object is now held by Warrnambool and District Historical Society. The inscription reads: “A Tribute to Egbert John Connell M.B.B.S. who for 30 years rendered devoted and valuable service to this institution. April 4th 1928" “At the start of the period the senior-part time medical officer was replaced by the junior resident medical officer and control of beds and the right to operate were given to the honorary medical officers...and these men dominated the Warrnambool medical world in the years before the Second World War.” (‘A History of the Warrnambool District Base Hospital’, Forth & Yule, 2002). In 1899 Dr. Connell purchased the ‘Ambleside’ medical practice in Koroit Street and his private consulting continued at this address until his death in 1928. He also took a prominent part in hospital work, both as physician and surgeon, and often acted as spokesmen for the Honorary Doctors. According to colleague Dr. Horace Holmes’ subsequent notes, it was after the close of the First World War, and the following years of the world-wide pneumonic influenza epidemic, that Dr. Connell himself contracted pneumonia and died. His family and friends then recorded his work by gifting the memorial window in his honour to the Hospital. By the mid-1970s the old wards at the hospital had been replaced and there was no obvious place for the window. Discussions between the previous and past Hospital managers, the Anglican Diocese, and Flagstaff Hill Planning Board, led to its installation in its present position in St Nicholas Seamen’s Church, (installed without the bottom section of stained glass, which was inscribed as a memorial to Dr. Connell). St NICHOLAS SEAMEN’S CHURCH, Anglican Church Flagstaff Hill’s Mission to Seamen was opened in 1981. Its conception was partly motivated by the offer of Stained Glass Memorial Windows from the local Warrnambool and District Base Hospital, which was undergoing multi-storey development in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. The Manager/Secretary at the time was keen to see the historical windows installed in an appropriate location. The chapel or chapel was designed by a local architectural draftsman in conjunction with members of the Planning Board of Flagstaff Hill, and built by Mr Leon Habel. The vision of the designers included the hope that the church be used for formal worship such as weddings and funeral, and for multi-denominational special services such as War commemorations. The design is based on the ‘Mission to Seamen’ buildings in both Portland and Port Melbourne. These types of buildings were often erected to house social and worshipful activities for seamen. The materials used in the building include sandstone recycled from nineteenth-century buildings demolished in Warrnambool and unusual beautiful green American slates (roofing tiles) retrieved from the 1908 wreck of the FALLS OF HALLADALE. Most of the chapel furnishings came from the Williamstown Missions to Seamen, which was consecrated in 1946 but later decommissioned. These artefacts range from the altar cloth to the hymn board and include a visually stunning round stained glass widow called ‘Christ Guiding the Helmsman’. However the provenance of this particular artefact, large western window, is local.

Significance

This stained glass memorial window is of local, historical and social significance for its link with local Warrnambool doctor, Dr. Egbert John Connell (late 19th – early 20th century) who gave 30 years of dedicated, medical service to the local citizens.

Inscriptions & Markings

(The window was installed without the original memorial dedication to Dr. Connell and accompanying maker marks – see “Context”.)