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Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) is the professional body for all specialist obstetricians and gynaecologists in Australia and New Zealand. The College has a museum collection comprising of O&G instruments. A key feature is a significant collection of obstetric forceps dating from the mid- 18th century to the present day. The advances in obstetric teaching, neo-natal investigation, as well as fertility investigation, infertility treatment and contraception are represented in the RANZCOG Museum collection.

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Contact Information

location
254-256 Albert Street, East Melbourne, Vic 3002 East Melbourne Vic 3002 (map)
phone
+61 61 3 9412 2923

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The RANZCOG Museum medical collection has medical equipment relating to the history of Obstetrics and Gynaecological practice and neonatal and postnatal care in Australia. The collection includes a fine collection of obstetric forceps, an extensive collection of contraceptive devices, fertility investigation equipment and some early Invitro- fertilization equipment, neonatal investigative equipment such foetal stethoscopes and ultrasound equipment, laparoscopy equipment, historic teaching models and a collection of microscopes.

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401 items

Cupping glass

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Glass connection with red rubber hand pump.

Historical information

A cupping glass was in use from the early 1700s. Its purpose was to draw the nipple out from the areola in preparation for breast feeding. It may also be used for expressing small quantities of breast milk. Other possible uses include drawing fluid from other parts of the body such as oedema of the limbs or abdomen.

Photograph, framed

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Portrait, framed black and white photograph of Professor Hector MacLellan 1905- 1978. Professor MacLellan was President of RCOG London in the 1960s.

Cervical Dilation kit

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Cervical Dilation kit,A set of 16 metal cervical dilators, graduaaaated sizes, in a metal case, manufacturer "WATVic/ George Carsberg LTD/ London". Victoria .

Historical information

Used by Dr Nance (Senior) of Colac,Victoriaand donaated by his son Dr Nance, who practised as a general practitioner in euamris, grauating form the University of Melbourne in 1956. Dr Nance gave his collection of instruments and some of his father's instruments to Dr Geoff Bishop in 1996.

teaching model, female reproductive organs

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Model of female uterus with cross-section revealing a foetus, also, fillopian tubes and ovaries with cut away section revealing vagina and cervix. Painted plastic on metal rod with round wooden stand. Labelled on base "AV618.2 / 01 Fetus". Stamped on base, "PRINCE HENRY'S HOSPITAL/ NURSES LIBRARY." Label underneath base"Adam Rouilly/ London England".

Historical information

Originally this teaching model belonged to Prince Henry's hospit�l library and was transferred to the Monash Medical Centre, Clayton in the 1970s by Sister Gertrude Berger, a famous nurse-educator, who is best known for her work leading up to the transfer of nursing education in Victoria from hospitals to universities in 1986.Gerty (as she was known in the School of Nursing) bought them in Europe in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Bottle, Chloroform

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Amber glass bottle (empty) with clear glass stopper with original label "W.J. Bush Ltd. London ... Chloroform.."". . On the base is the number "12" and "AS 9A"

Pelvimeter, Ramsay

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Pelvimeter, metal, with callibrator graduated to 18 inches/ 45 cms. Inscribed " Ramsay" upper arm.

Historical information

This was included with other obstetric instruments, mostly destructive instruments, from Box Hill Hospital labour ward given to RANZCOG in February- March 1998. The maternity service at Box Hill hospital combined with St Geroge's hospital in Kew to be known as Birralee Maternity Service. These instruments were collected by Julie Collette, Unit Manager, St George's Kew and given to RANZCOG Museum Curator, Susan Barnett.

Bottle, infant feeding

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Bottle, glass, for infant feeding, four sided, tapering to a short neck. Callibrations in both imperial and metric,, imprinted "MAWS". On base, "MADE IN BELGIUM'.

Infant feeding bottle

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Clear glass bottle tapering to a short narrow neck 17.5 cms in length. Calibrations embossed on the glass in ounces (0-8) and mls (0-240). Embossed on the side: "Agee Pyrex Feeder".

Pap boat

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Pap boat, also known as an infant feeding cup made of white china with an extended slim lip.

Dilator, uterine, Goodell's

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Uterine dilator, Goodell's, stamped inside the blades '22". Manufacturers logo stamped on near netral screw joint, Medical symbol, serpent entwined around a sword with crown on top.

Historical information

Mostl likely donated by Dr Frank Forster, possibly collected by him from colleagues initially.

Crochet

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Crochet, with slightly tapered rod, ["Continental" marked on label] and with a mahogany turned handle. Stamped near handle, Krohne & Co London.

Historical information

Most likely collected and donated by Dr Frank Forster.

Pessary, wishbone

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Pessary, wishbone, intracervical device, copper metal compound with a round head and two wings.

Historical information

Acquired 27/11/1997. The wishbone pessary had flexible wings that were compressed to facilitate insertion into the cervical canal.

pointing bone

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Aboriginal pointing bone, from Cerntral Ayustralia, rituallistically used in a ceremony of male contraception. The object is a macropod fibula. At one end theire is a blob of resin and an attachment of human hair string,, at the other end , the bone has been sharpened to a point.

Historical information

used in ceremonies as a pointing bione were sorcery was performed on the male to prevent him from impregnating his woman..see supplimentry file 27.The pointing bome was given to Sir Wilfred Fsh, FRC, presumablyin the 1920s,. His daughter Mrs Vivian Greaves gave this item to Sir Keith Draytion., of New Zealnd. He thouight it was more appropriate forr the Australian college to have it and,passed it on to Professor Frazer.

Stamp, postal

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

One stamp, issued to celebrate the centenary of antiseptic surgeryc1961in the United Kingdom. Heading; "Lister Centenary" portrait images of Joseph Lister and Queen Elizabeth 2.

Teaching model, female reproduction organs

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Teaching model- 3D Female Reproduction Organs Painted and numbered plastic mould, showing vagina and one ovary and fillopian tude in cross-section. The model is mounted on metallic grey painted timber panel. Manufacturer Adam Rouilly, London. label on lower right.].Monash Medical Centre Clayton. Accompanying booklet missing.

Historical information

Originally this teaching model belonged to Prince Henry's hospital library and was transferred to the Monash Medical Centre, Clayton in the 1970s by Sister Gertrude Berger, a famous nurse-educator, who is best known for her work leading up to the transfer of nursing education in Victoria from hospitals to universities in 1986.Gerty (as she was known in the School of Nursing) bought them in Europe in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Box lid

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Box lid, circular, cardboard, manufacturer Dr Wansbrough, with label and instructions containing two lead nipple shields.

Operating table, portable of Sir Victor Bonney

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Operating table, portable, comprised of a laminated plywood rectangular panel, with two laminated plywood extensions; a head board and a foot board. Two detachable stirrup poles each with a canvas stirrup attached fit into two holes at the lower end of the centre panel. The table is supported by two timber trellises cross braced with metal bars and supported at the centre by two metal arcs that allow the table to be tilted and locked into the desired position, allowing a Trendelenburg tilt ( a 45 degree tilt, with the patient's head downwards.) The operating table is demountable for transportation and re-assembly.

Historical information

This portable operating table was owned and used by a famous Gynaecological Surgeon Sir Victor Bonney in London, U.K. c 1900. This highly successful surgeon employed two theatre sisters and had two sets of instruments and portable operating tables. This made it possible for Dr Bonney to 'complete three or more operations a day by rotating staff and equipment with a chauffeur driven Lanchester or Rolls Royce', delivering them from one house to the next. The donor of the operating table, the late Dr Frank Forster, was a distant relative of Sir Victor Bonney's widow, Annie Appleyard formerly of Tasmania. When he visited her in the UK after Bonney death, she offered the operating table to Dr Forster for the RANZCOG Museum. It was still in a canvas bag in the boot of one of Bonney's cars.

Significance

Sir Victor Bonney was the pioneer of myomectomy; the surgical procedure for removing uterine fybroids. In collaboration with Berkeley, he extended and perfected Wertheim's operation for carcinoma of the cervix. Bonney was an influential teacher, developing and promoting conservatism of surgical technique (minimal intervention) that has had a lasting influence in modern surgical practice. To theatre-sisters, labour-ward sisters and young house-surgeons he will always be remembered as the discoverer of Bonney's Blue an antiseptic that was characteristically blue.

Inscriptions & Markings

Traces of staining by antiseptic solution Bonney's Blue centre of the main panel.

Pessary, Hasting's Cup

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Black vulcanite pessary with a stem attached to a cup. This device was used for the treatment of procidentia (severe utero-vaginal prolapse). Cotton tape would be attached via the holes at the distal end of the instrument and tied around the waist to hold the pessary in position.

Historical information

The usually enlarged cervix would sit in the inserted cup. The vagina and the uterus were returned to the anatomically correct position. The instrument would be removed for cleaning approximately every three months. Women deemed to be a severe surgical risk were the beneficiaries of this treatment.

Container, tin

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Round metal tin with yellow label containing silkworm gut used for suturing.

Historical information

This item belonged to Dr Mitchell Henry O'Sullivan�s (1892-1972) obstetric bag

Irrigator, rectal or vaginal

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Irrigator nozzle, black bakerlite,.

Historical information

Artefact may have been used for enema or vaginal irrigation. Mary Howlett (1840-1922) began practising as a country midwife in 1866 in the western district of Victoria. She qualified as a 'ladies monthly nurse' in 1887 and continued to practise as a nurse and midwife until 1920. Mrs Howlett's midwifery box and contents were given to Dr Frank Forster and he donated to the museum collection in the 1993. A related item held in the collection is Mrs Howlett's linen apron donated by Patricia Thompson in 1993.

Photograph

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Photograph, sepia, Mrs Mary Howlett, midwife, formal studio portrait, studio stamp "Johstone O'Shannessy & Co." Inscribed on verso, probably by Dr Frank Forster, "MRS MARY LIVINGSTONE/ HOWLETT".

Historical information

This paper was read on 14 June 1965 by Dr Frank Forster at a meeting of the section of Medical History, Victorian branch, Australian Medical Association, according to Ann Tovell, who worked at the AMA and in association with Frank. It was likely that Frank Forster acquired the midwifery box belonging to Mrs Mary Howlett at the former Eastern market that was located on the corner of Bourke and Russell Streets up to the early 1960s.

Forceps, artery

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Pocket dressing case, chamois, containing Staight Spencer Wells artery forceps x2, Allis box jointed tissue forceps x2, straight probe, curved mayo scissors, straight dissecting forceps, catheter [female], straight McPhail needle holder.

Towel

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Towel, thick cotton, "Hospital" woven into the central band.

Historical information

Dr Henry Mitchell O'Sullivan worked in the Victorian country town as a general practitioner in Casterton from 1919 until his death in 1977. He also practiced obstetrics. The gladstone bag and contents are a unique time capsule of the type of instruments and pharmaceuticals used in the inter-war period. His son, Dr David More O'Sullivan donated the obstetric bag and its contents to the College in 1999.

Douche, syringe

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Douche, syringe, consisting of bakerlite hollow rod with a red rubber bulb, imprinted in black, "CORONET GARANTEED", "ENGLISH MADE".

Historical information

This douche syringe was in the collection of Dr Frank Forster.

Tubal insufflator

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Rubin's tubal insufflator apparatus, large cylidrical glass canister inside a portable carry box with two doors with three glass nozzels at top with long rubber tubing attached on each. One surigical steel introducer, one glass introducer attached. A blood pressure manometer fixed on the inside door [incomplete or not available in this possibly early model?] Model may be dated c1919 or 1920s or 1930s. 1919 was the year Isodor Clinton Rubin (1883-1958) introduced the apparatus to detect tubal patency and investigate infertility.

Historical information

Label with Cyrus Jones monogram " Donated by Dr Lorna Lloyd Green, 1986/ Rubin's Insufflator/ NB "sparklet holder separate" missing?

Forceps,Denman's

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Forceps, Denman's, one blade only [incomplete], mahony insert in handle. Manufacturer's stamp, W & H HUTCHINSON/ SHEFFIELD on inner arm. These incomplete forceps have the exact dimesnions of the Denman forceps, seee table at back of Das, K "Obstetric Forceps".

Historical information

Possibly collected by Dr Frank Forster

Blunt hook and crochet

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Blunt hook and crochet, fitting one handle. Manufacters stamp, "Mayer & Meltzer London"

Identification bracelet

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Silver identification bracelet engraved with "FJ Browne/ Heath Lodge/ Watford Heath" worn by F.J. Brown, member of Royal Flying Corps.

Historical information

Identification badges were worn during World War II in England.

Infant feeding bottle

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Clear glass feeding bottle curved in the shape of a banana with a botttle neck at either end 18 cms in length. A flat depression on the underside allows the object to lie on a flat surface. The back of the bottle is marked in ounces and the front in tablespoons. Embossed on the front is a picture of a bee hive on a stand with the words: 'Ever Sweet Sanitary Feeder'.

Historical information

This feeder was used by the parents of Gerald Anderson to feed him Lactogen in 1922.

Test tube and case

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists,

Glass test tube with a thin glass lip in original cylinder cardboard case.

Historical information

This type of test tube would have been used to collect blood or other bodily fluids such as urine.