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Plutarch Project Caulfield Junction, Victoria

A Special committee, part of the Greek Community in Melbourne, which will collect and record information of significanct about Greek the settlement in Victoria

Contact Information

location
P.O. Box 2343 Caulfield Junction 3161 (map)
phone
+61 413057426

Contact

Location

Caulfield Junction Victoria

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The Plutarch Project is a project that we hope will encompass the collections of most organisations in Victoria of Greek background. Some of these organisations have been around for more than 100 years in Melbourne. And it will be difficult to assess their archives as to what exactly they contain. However we're sure that there are thousands of valuable items out there that mark the history of settlement of Greeks in Australia. The first generation migrants to this state have almost passed away in total. Their descendants are not as interested as the first generation about objects used in expressing themselves, establishing themselves, co-ordinating settlement of their families, organising community groups, excelling in arts, sports, medicine, law etc. This history will eventually be completely lost unless there is a serious look at what is there. So partially Plutarch Project is a way of identifying the objects in question as well as making sure they're not ending up into the rubbish tips. Australia has a lot to benefit from recording its own history. We do not need to go into that topic. The Plutarch Project is an avenue that will not only identify but also record what is really out there and nobody really knows to-date.

Significance

Like in every collection, there are items of extreme significant value and others no so. In order to be able to ascertain the real significant value we must start collecting information. We expect to find items of historical, artistic, social and scientific significance. However even this is speculation unless the proper registration starts.

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31 items

Film magazine - Κινηματογραφικός Αστήρ

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Bi-weekly magazine size A4, published in black and white by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures" for the purposes of film shows and distributed free of charge.

Historical information

This magazine was first published in January 1959 and was a fortnightly edition which was distributed for free. The story is that in May 1963 at the National Theatre in Richmond when the film titled "KRYSTALLO" ("Κρυστάλλω") was about to be screened for the first time "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures" thought of a very unique way of promoting it. Apart from the usual publications to the "Kinimatografikos Astir" (Film Star) magazine and the flyers, they decided to display on the theatre roof 25 live sheep in a scene from a typical Greek village stable with a shepherd etc. They also assigned the task of creating a large banner sized 2 metres by 8 meters approx. to an Australian artist (name unknown) to adorn the front of the National Theatre. When these sheep and the banner were finally displayed before the first screening there was so much traffic congestion created in front of the theatre that it became a standstill. Very quickly the police was informed and the RSPCA who attended and ordered the organisers to dismantle the setup of sheep on the roof as it was considered cruelty to the animals and that it was organised without a proper license. Nevertheless the film had so much success, that it was unprecedented for the times. First showing was 9th May 1963

Significance

Primary historic significance to the Greek Film and Entertainment industries in Australia. Secondary Social and Rarity publication significance.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Κινηματογραφικός Αστήρ"

Girls dancing costume scarf - κασκόλ, στολή, costume, scarf, Plutarch

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Yellow girl's dancing costume scarf, triangular in shape, silk with gold and silver embroidery around top. Part "D" of a four piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by girls in the 16th to 19th century AD. In Australia used by Thessaloniki Association “The White Tower” in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in functions, dancing and parades.

Projector tripod stand

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Metal construction Projector tripod with a cloth on top to stop damaging the projectors. It has an adjustable height depending that extends to about 1.5 metres.

Historical information

From January 1959 and until 1982, “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures”, owned by Mr Peter Yannoudes (Παναγιώτης Γιαννούδης) and Mr Stathis Raftopoulos (Στάθης Ραφτόπουλος) travelled around Australia to entertain the Greek, Turkish, Indian and Yugoslav speaking population of Australia and provide a significant cinema culture. They travelled as far as Perth in WA, Adelaide in SA, Tasmania, Darwin in Nt, Canberra in ACT and Sydney and NSW. However they found themselves also in places like Berri and Renmark in NSW, where concentrations of migrants lived and thrived during the period. Initially they were travelling by train, carrying all their equipment by hand and placing them in boxes and suitcases. However after 1962 when they acquired their first automobile, travelling became less of a burden, nevertheless cumbersome and laborious. They carried with them initially two portable projectors (second one as a backup) and at times travelled with a third in order to ensure that technology will not be letting them down at the time of film projection. At times the films were projected onto a white sheet of cloth because there was no proper screen to project it on at the venue they were using. This projector stand was the actual projector stand used in their trips around Australia.

Significance

Historic and rarity (only one left that was used by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures") Primary significance

Inscriptions & Markings

T.J.N. Macey - Toolmaker and Manufacturing Engineer

Door key

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Metal key with an eye on top and long by today's means, used to open front door of a house in Kato Zodia, Cyprus

Historical information

This key was taken by the owner of the house as they were trying to flee from a war zone because of an invasion in 1974.

Significance

The name of the person who took it was Ioanna Spyrou of Kato Zodia, Cyprus when she fled with her 6 member family to the south of the island to avoid the war zone. Then it was handed over to her eldest daughter Andrea. The original owner passed away in 1988

Girl's dancing costume vest - Γιλέκο στολής βλαχοπούλας

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Red velvet girl's dancing costume vest with embroidery along outside and sleeves. Part "B" of a four piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by ladies in the 16th to 19th century AD. Here used by Thessaloniki Association in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in functions, dancing and parades.

Printed handkerchief

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

A white printed paper towel inscribed, in black ink, with a message in Greek to those it was handed to by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures"

Historical information

This handkerchief was used as a marketing material to promote the film titled "The Heavens are ours" in Greek by "New World Film Entertainment" shown at Melbourne Town Hall. There were 2000 of these printed by the company for the premiera showing. The film was later screened by the same company at Premier Theatre in November 1958 by popular demand. The handkerchief gesture had the desired effect of attracting large crowds to the show.

Significance

This handkerchief's primary significance is derived from the innovative story behind its use.

Inscriptions & Markings

The inscription in Greek says: "ΦΕΡΤΕ ΤΟ ΜΑΖΥ ΣΑΣ. Θα σας χρησιμεύσει να σφουγγίσετε τα δάκρυά σας παρακολουθώντας το συγκινητικώτερο, το δραματικώτερο δράμα όλων των εποχών που θα κάνει και τις άψυχες πέτρες να ραγίσουν 'ΟΙ ΟΥΡΑΝΟΙ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΔΙΚΟΙ ΜΑΣ'...." In English translation it says: "BRING IT WITH YOU. You will need to wipe your tears watching the most dramatic and emotional film ever, that will have stones with no soul crack... titled "THE HEAVENS ARE OURS" with the unforgettable Golfo Antigoni Valakou, of the most prominent film production company FINOS-FILM presented by NEW WORLD ENTERTAINMENT. The touching story of a girl who has been lost by her parents she still lives with them, in sadness and in laughter.... THE MOVIE THAT NEEDS TO BE WATCHED BY EVERY FATHER , EVERY MOTHER, EVERY YOUNG MAN AND WOMAN. In Melbourne On Saturday, 19th April 1958 MELBOURNE TOWN HALL

Lady's dancing costume Apron - Ποδιά στολής βλαχοπούλας

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Navy embroidered apron with sequins and coloured stitching. Black lining on reverse side. Part "B" of a four piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by ladies in the 16th to 19th century AD. Now used in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume.

Girls dancing costume apron

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Girl's dancing costume apron, red velvet with embroidery along outside. Red lining. Part "C" of a 4 piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by girls in the 16th to 19th century AD. In Australia used by Thessaloniki Association “The White Tower” in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in functions, dancing and parades.

16mm Portable Optical & Magnetic Sound Projector

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

From January 1959 and until 1982, “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures”, owned by Mr Peter Yannoudes (Παναγιώτης Γιαννούδης) and Mr Stathis Raftopoulos (Στάθης Ραφτόπουλος) travelled around Australia to entertain the Greek, Turkish, Indian and Yugoslav speaking population of Australia and provide a significant cinema culture. They travelled as far as Perth in WA, Adelaide in SA, Tasmania, Darwin in Nt, Canberra in ACT and Sydney and NSW. However they found themselves also in places like Berri and Renmark in NSW, where concentrations of migrants lived and thrived during the period. Initially they were travelling by train, carrying all their equipment by hand and placing them in boxes and suitcases. However after 1962 when they acquired their first automobile, travelling became less of a burden, nevertheless cumbersome and laborious. They carried with them initially two portable projectors (second one as a backup) and at times travelled with a third in order to ensure that technology will not be letting them down at the time of film projection. At times the films were projected onto a white sheet of cloth because there was no proper screen to project it on at the venue they were using. One of the three projectors used in every trip was this 16mm Portable Projector, which was used taken to about 60 towns and cities around Australia, as Mr Yiannoudes states. This projector is in working condition serviced by Mr Yiannoudes himself regularly. It is an optical and magnetic sound projector, a rare one of its type. Apart from this projector these items were taken on each trip. -a- 3 projectors in total -b- 2 tripod stands -c- 1 20 feet x 10 feet screen -d- 6 projector lamps and 2 exider lamps for sound -e- 2 extra lamps per film to be shown -f- 1 film rewinder (see rewinder in same collection)

Historical information

One of the three projectors used in every trip was this 16mm Portable Projector, which was used taken to about 60 towns and cities around Australia, as Mr Yiannoudes states. This projector is in working condition serviced by Mr Yiannoudes himself regularly. It is an optical and magnetic sound projector, a rare one of its type.

Significance

Primary historic significance as well as rarity significance

Inscriptions & Markings

Siemens

Shortwave Radio Antenna - Active Antenna

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

"World Tuner AT4 SW" antenna with a 920mm fully extended aerial, a tuned circuit and two transistors to prevent loading of the antenna and boost signal output. It is made of plastic, black in colour with the aerial being made of steel. The signals picked up by the antenna are fed via a 15pF ceramic capacitor to a tuned circuit consisting of either VC1a or VC1b and either L1, L2, L3 or L4. The slider switch S1 selects the band to be tuned. The band range is normally from 3 to 30MHz. When S1 is in position A, L1 and VC1a are selected and the antenna can be tuned from 3-9MHz. Similarly positions B, C, and D select higher frequencies up to 30MHz. It was purchased by Iakovos Garivaldis for this use for $119.

Historical information

This antenna was used between 1989 and 1990 to help receive the daily news service in the Greek language directly from Athens, Greece. At the time, news from Greece for the Greek people in Australia were arriving in Melbourne a week late, on newspapers from Athens sent through air-mail. These newspapers were displayed at Salapatas and Carras newsagents at Lonsdale street in Melbourne. One thing that was a problem for this service was that the news came at least 7 days late. Using the Shortwave Antenna we could get the latest news from Athens on shortwave radio directly and within an hour these news were recorded on a cassette tape and taken to the Tricom Group P.L. offices in Melbourne (1155 Malvern Road, Malvern 3144). The tape was loaded onto a system which allowed people to call a local phone number and listen to the latest news with a cost of a local call, or a little bit more. As this was prior to the Internet being established around the globe, it was the fastest news service directly from Greece, in the Greek language. It was used for a span of about 12 months, until Tricom closed down their dial-in services, sometime in 1990. The service was captured and loaded onto the system by Iakovos Garivaldis, then an employee of the Tricom Group which was a subsidiary of Southern Cross TV.

Significance

The Primary significance of this object is of its historical value, social and informative value for the first generation of Greeks in Victoria

Inscriptions & Markings

WORLD TUNER AT4 SW "Amplituned" Shortwave Antenna

Kritovoulos Book - Κριτόβουλος (ο Ίμβριος)

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Book in the Greek language, written by Panayotis Kalaitzis.

Historical information

This author P. Kalaitzis was founder and director of the magazine by the name "Σύγγραμμα - Επετηρίς" at the time of publication. He describes here the education situation on the island of Imbros from the 17th Century till the mid-1900s. The book is in the Greek language. It has no illustrations and its 18 pages long. - It was printed by printers D. Giannopoulos - 3 Kororoit Creek Rd., North Williamstown

Significance

Historical significance of the activity of Greeks in Victoria during the period

Inscriptions & Markings

ΚΕΝΤΡΟΝ Ιμβριακών και Τενεδιακών Σπουδών - Περιοδικόν Συγγραμα - Επετηρίς, Ιδρυτής Διευθυντής Παναγιώτης Δ. Καλαϊτζής. Έκδοσις Β'. (Issue B), Melbourne 1972. Blue soft cover

Boy's Costume dress - Φουστανέλα

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

White linen cloth dress worn by soldiers from the 16th to 19th century AD. It has 400 creases depicting the 400 years Greece was under occupation by the Turks.

Historical information

Part of the Tsolia traditional Costume worn by soldiers in the 16th to 19th century in the mountains of Greece. It has 400 creases depicting the 400 years Greece was under occupation by the Turks.

Head of Apollo sculpture - Apollo

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Sculpture of head of Apollo, carved out of jelutong wood

Historical information

This beautiful sculpture by Sotiris Mandalvanos has been created in 1986 and its an artifice from the original statue of Apollo in Olympia Greece

Significance

The sculpture primarily has an artistic and historical value because it is the only known sculpture of Apollo by the only known sculptor migrant of Greek origin in Melbourne.

Inscriptions & Markings

Back inscription by hand "SM 1986"

35mm Projector

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

This metal (most probably steel) projector is part of a number of projectors owned by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures". It is in dark blue/grey colour and still operational to project 35mm films if needed. It has two inscriptions detailed below and was last used at Liberty/Galaxy Theatre in Brunswick in 1985 (for more details about the history of Galaxy Theatre follow this link http://technicolouryawn.com/?page_id=2988)

Historical information

This 35mm Westrex 14 projector was purchased from Waverley Theatre (Cnr Burke Road and Waverley Road in Malvern, in 1962) last used by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures" as follows: from 1962 to 1967 - National Theatre, Richmond. from 1967 to 1970 - in a small leatherette on Bridge Road, Richmond. from 1971 to 1985 - Galaxy Theatre Brunswick. After that it was stored at the back of Westgarth Theatre in Northcote.

Significance

This projector has a primary historic significance as it covers the largest part of the history of film shows by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures", and cultural/social significance since it has been used to project a number of other language films (about 10 different languages) by the company. It also carries a secondary significance of rarity being the last used projector by the company at Galaxy Theatre.

Inscriptions & Markings

INSCRIPTION 1 (red background) Westrex 14, High Intensity Arc Lamp, Serial Number A.5401018. Manufactured for Westrex (Australia) Pty. Limited by G.B.H. Electronic Laboratories - Made in N.S.W. Australia INSCRIPTION 2 (blue background) Westrex R4A Reproducer Made in Australia Western Electric Co. (Aust) Pty. Ltd.

Hand Operated drill

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Metal adjustable height, hand operated drill. Rusty appearance. It seems to have a small piece at the bottom broken off, but still in working order according to Mr P. Yiannoudes. This drill was used to drill holes in cinema light carbon sticks in order to extend their life.

Historical information

From January 1959 and until 1982, “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures”, owned by Mr Peter Yannoudes (Παναγιώτης Γιαννούδης) and Mr Stathis Raftopoulos (Στάθης Ραφτόπουλος) travelled around Australia to entertain the Greek, Turkish, Indian and Yugoslav speaking population of Australia and provide a significant cinema culture. They travelled as far as Perth in WA, Adelaide in SA, Tasmania, Darwin in Nt, Canberra in ACT and Sydney and NSW. However they found themselves also in places like Berri and Renmark in NSW, where concentrations of migrants lived and thrived during the period. Initially they were travelling by train, carrying all their equipment by hand and placing them in boxes and suitcases. However after 1962 when they acquired their first automobile, travelling became less of a burden, nevertheless cumbersome and laborious. They carried with them initially two portable projectors (second one as a backup) and at times travelled with a third in order to ensure that technology will not be letting them down at the time of film projection. At times the films were projected onto a white sheet of cloth because there was no proper screen to project it on at the venue they were using.

Significance

Primary historic significance in the context that it was used, as well as rarity significance

Boy's soccer shorts

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Navy blue polyester soccer shorts with white string around waist and side inscription. Part "B" of a two piece soccer uniform.

Historical information

The full costume was worn by players belonging to the Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower" taking part in outdoor and indoor soccer matches organised by the Association as part of the annual "Dimitria" celebrations called DIMITRIA CUP, starting from 1997 and beyond. It is not know exactly when was the last time the tournament was held.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in tournaments, indoor and outdoor soccer competitions at the DIMITRIA CUP, which was done through co-operation of Thessaloniki Association and Pan-Macedonian Association

Lady's dancing costume Belt - Ζώνη από στολή βλαχοπούλας

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Lady's dancing costume belt. Woollen with silver sequins and beading. Fringe on either end. Slightly damaged, silver buttons missing. Part "D" of a four piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by ladies in the 16th to 19th century AD. Now used in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume. In Australia used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower".

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in functions, dancing and parades.

Greek serving as an Australian solider WW2

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Photo in brown frame Photo solo solider in uniform, shorts and wearing a cap, holding rifle bayonet, standing at attention.

Historical information

Paul Soumilas left Greece with his family to escape the 2ndWW, but was then conscripted by the Australian Air force when he arrived in Australia/

Significance

Many Greeks immigrants served in the Australia armed forces at times of conflict.

Men's Soccer Jersey

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Men's navy blue and white soccer jersey, with white collar and inscriptions. Has Thessaloniki logo across the chest and in white writing, S.S.I. logo, and Pronto Refrigeration logo of same name sponsor. S.S.I. manufacturer logo also on white collar. Polyester material and part "A" of a two piece uniform.

Historical information

Full uniform used by Thessaloniki Association's soccer team in a tournament organised as part of "Dimitria" celebrations in soccer matches, outdoor and indoor.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in indoor and outdoor soccer matches

Inscriptions & Markings

Thessaloniki, S.S.I., Pronto Refrigeration

Girl's dancing costume dress - Κοριτσίστικη στολή Βλαχοπούλας

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Girl's white cotton dancing costume dress, with embroidery along neck, sleeves and bottom of dress. Part "A" of a four piece costume. Four in Thessaloniki Association's possession.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by ladies in the 16th to 19th century AD. Now used in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume.

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association "The White Tower", in functions, dancing and parades.

Film rewinder

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

A film rewinding gadget, perhaps home made, with a wooden base, two reels, and an metal winder used for transferring the film from one reel to the next.

Historical information

From January 1959 and until 1982, “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures”, owned by Mr Peter Yannoudes (Παναγιώτης Γιαννούδης) and Mr Stathis Raftopoulos (Στάθης Ραφτόπουλος) travelled around Australia to entertain the Greek, Turkish, Indian and Yugoslav speaking population of Australia and provide a significant cinema culture. They travelled as far as Perth in WA, Adelaide in SA, Tasmania, Darwin in Nt, Canberra in ACT and Sydney and NSW. However they found themselves also in places like Berri and Renmark in NSW, where concentrations of migrants lived and thrived during the period. Initially they were travelling by train, carrying all their equipment by hand and placing them in boxes and suitcases. However after 1962 when they acquired their first automobile, travelling became less of a burden, nevertheless cumbersome and laborious. They carried with them initially two portable projectors (second one as a backup) and at times travelled with a third in order to ensure that technology will not be letting them down at the time of film projection. At times the films were projected onto a white sheet of cloth because there was no proper screen to project it on at the venue they were using. This winder was part of the equipment they carried around Australia

Significance

Historical significance Primarily as it is the actual unit used to manually rewind all films.

Inscriptions & Markings

"Premier - Made in England"

Boy's Tsolia Costume belt - Ζώνη από στολή τσολιά

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Part of a six piece costume, red woollen belt with black fringe. The full costume used traditionally by soldiers in the 16th to 19th century AD. Recently used in parades and plays as a traditional costume

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by soldiers in the 16th to 19th century AD. Recently used in parades and plays as a traditional costume. This is the actual belt used with the costume

Significance

Has been used by Thessaloniki Association in parades and plays

Boy's Costume Jacket - Παιδική στολή τσιολιά

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

This is a jacket for boys that is worn as part of the six piece traditional costume. It is navy blue in color and has gold and silver embroidery along the edges. It has silver buttons and a silky orange lining

Historical information

This is part of a contemporary traditional costume worn by males in parades and theatre productions these days, however worn by soldiers in battle during war times in Greece in the 18th - 19th century

Trireme Replica - Paralos

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Wooden replica model ship that is an exact replica of the ancient Athenian trireme making it unique in the world since there's no other such replica made. Great care was exercised to ensure that it will include all functionality and detail of the ancient ship used to by the Athenians to fight in the Sea battle of Salamis and beyond. Mr Denis Paraskevatos constructed the Paralos Trireme over a period of eighteen months. Mr Paraskevatos relayed the history of his Trireme. The first Trireme was constructed in Greece by the shipbuilder Aminoklis in 704BC, originating from Corinth. The first four Triremes he constructed were ordered by a Poliykrates from Samos, thus the ships were known as Samines. Poliykrates realised he would be able to use the Triremes for his own benefit against invading pirates, as well as to engage in activities of piracy himself. The Athenians built 200 Triremes for the battle of Salamis, all constructed over a period of eighteen months. This was a huge feat, on average a new ship was build every second day. Triremes were primarily used in sea battles, however there were two unique Triremes, the Salaminia and the Paralos, which were considered Holy and only used for Ambassadors and Consulates on overseas trips. Mr Paraskevatos’ Trireme is the Paralos. The term Paralos derives from the Greek social class from the shores, or the merchant classes. Greece was divided into three basic social classes. The mountain region, the plateaus or fields bound to agriculture, and those from the shores. Paralia translates to from the shore. The Paralia were an important class in influencing the democracy. They were divergent group who would deliberately vote on the contrary to everyone else. This is how the Trireme was born. Every Trireme held between 20-50 soldiers, and either 170 or 174 oarsmen. Mr Paraskevatos’ Trireme is a 174 oarsmen ship. The role of the oarsmen was difficult and specialised. When engaged in sea battle and the wind was not enough, the navy would remove the masts and leave them on shore and solely use the oarsmen, leaving the deck clear. However when there were sufficient winds and both the sails and oars were in use the oarsmen had to show great skill in manoeuvrability. When the oarsmen were not needed to manoeuvre the ship they also engaged in battle.

Historical information

The name Trireme comes from its distinct three rows of oars/oarsmen. The first tier of rowers were known as the Thranites, translating to Thrones. They were the most prestigious, and worked the hardest because their oars were furthest away from the water and therefore had to work harder. They were usually younger and they were paid one and a half drachma per day, half a drachma more than the other two tiers of rowers who were paid one drachma per day. After a few years working as Thranites, each was moved down into the second tier, the Zygites. Zygites derives from the word balance, as the second tier was balanced in the middle. After more years again, oarsmen were moved down into the third and final tier, known as the Thalamites. The Thalamites were consistently wet due to the proximity of their tier to the water. The water would leak through the gaps where the oars entered the ships despite the leather skins used to close the openings.

Significance

This is a unique specimen made by D. Paraskevatos, in that it is the only one of its kind in the world that has been built to the exact specifications of the Athenian vessel. It was built in Melbourne and it also has historic and artistic value

Boy's Costume beanie - σκούφο

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Red woollen beanie with black tassel part of the traditional tsolia costume, with tassel stitched to the top of the beanie. Part "E" of a 6 piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by soldiers in the 16th to 19th century AD. Recently used in parades and plays as a traditional costume. Beanie is an integral part of the costume

Significance

Historical significance used as part of traditional functions by Thessaloniki Association

Film screening Log Book - Log Book

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

This is the Log Book, manually updated and used by "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures" for films shown in different parts of Australia

Historical information

Yiannoudes Family Film Memorabilia It is normally a time consuming and difficult task to accurately assess a collection’s significance to the primary criteria, however in the case of the “Yiannoudes Family Film Memorabilia” we have no hesitation of its high significance about its historic, social, rarity, interpretive, cultural and provenance to Australia, including the country side where most of this collection memorabilia visited. From January 1959 and until 1982, “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures”, owned by Mr Peter Yannoudes (Παναγιώτης Γιαννούδης) and Mr Stathis Raftopoulos (Στάθης Ραφτόπουλος) travelled around Australia to entertain the Greek, Turkish, Indian and Yugoslav speaking population of Australia and provide a significant cinema culture. They travelled as far as Perth in WA, Adelaide in SA, Tasmania, Darwin in Nt, Canberra in ACT and Sydney and NSW. However they found themselves also in places like Berri and Renmark in NSW, where concentrations of migrants lived and thrived during the period. Initially they were travelling by train, carrying all their equipment by hand and placing them in boxes and suitcases. However after 1962 when they acquired their first automobile, travelling became less of a burden, nevertheless cumbersome and laborious. They carried with them initially two portable projectors (second one as a backup) and at times travelled with a third in order to ensure that technology will not be letting them down at the time of film projection. At times the films were projected onto a white sheet of cloth because there was no proper screen to project it on at the venue they were using. Mr P. Yiannoudes has also published a book in October 2010, titled “Greek Cinema Across Australia – Behind the Scenes”. The book was published in two languages, English and in Greek. Details about the launch can be found on the Diasporic Literature Spot website at this address (in the Greek language) http://diasporic.org/ellinika/biblia/greek-films-in-australia/. His book is devoted to those with whom he co-operated in order to bring for the first time Greek language films into Australia. Their names are: Stathis Raftopoulos, Andreas Papadopoulos, Andreas Katopodis, Theodoros Kanellopoulos, Michael Ioannou, Fotis Hatzipavlides, Kostas Vrahnas, Evaggelos Terpenos, Dionysis Lourantos, Dimitris Georgiou, Vasilis Florias and Jim Gragie. All businessmen with the right entrepreneurial spirit to be the first and to make their mark in the making of cultural Australia. Mr P. Yiannoudes a Cypriot by descent born in the town of Vouni, a village in the area of Lemesos. In Lemesos he learned the first few things about cinema which would help him in all his later life. He migrated to Australia in 1956 has been a prominent member of the Greek & Cypriot Communities in Melbourne for many decades. He has been President of the Cypriot Community, President of Federation of Cypriot Communities in Australia (for 18 years), President of SEKA (for 26 years) and highly regarded member of the Greek-Cypriots Diaspora since he also has been Vice-President of the Global Federation of Cypriots of Diaspora for 18 years. Mr P. Yiannoudes is now working on creating a small museum of these pieces in the back of the Westgarth Theatre with the help of the Plutarch Project and …. In this collection numbering hundreds of items, we will try and capture some of the glory that was the Greek film industry in Australia for 23 years between 1959 and 1982. “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures” also owned a large number of cinemas in Melbourne, the National Theatre in Richmond, the Westgarth Theatre in Northcote (which is still owned by the Yiannoudes family today), Sun Theatre in Yarraville, Kinema in Albert Park, Empire Theatre in Brunswick, Paramount Theatre in Oakleigh, Globe Theatre in Richmond, Galaxy Theatre in Brunswick and the Cosmopolitan Theatre in Brusnwick. At the same time they were hiring other theatres for film projections. They were the Astor Theatre in St. Kilda, Victoria Theatre in Richmond, Sunshine Theatre in Sunshine. Apart from Melbourne they were using the Pantheon Theatre in Adelaide, the Norwood Town Hall in Adelaide, the Shepparton Town Hall in Shepparton, the Premier Theatre in Perth, the Rivoli Theatre in Berri and the Renmark Theatre in Renmark. The number of films shown around Australia were over 1500 in total whilst about 1218 of them were in the Greek language. Other languages shown were in Turkish (about 150 films), Yugoslavian (about 100 films), English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch language films. “Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures” was the first company to bring Swedish and Dutch films to Australia. They also showed Martial Arts films for the first time in Australia in 1975 at the Galaxy Theatre in Melbourne. However one of the most significant pieces that tell the story with places and dates is the Show Logbook. The Show Logbook has a large number of stories to tell. It is still intact and in fair condition after all these years of travelling around Australia. It is categorised with an alphabetic index on the right by film title. Greek, Indian, Turkish and Yugoslav language film titles adorn its pages alongside the place where they were first shown, the towns and cities they visited and the dates for each one. It is an extremely significant part of history of the settlement of migrants in Australia.

Significance

This Log Book is of Primary Significance to the "Cosmopolitan Motion Pictures" and the Yiannoudes family film memorabilia collection. It has a Historic, Social, Provenance and Rarity significance for the settlement of migrants in Australia and the entertainment industry.

Inscriptions & Markings

Collins Stock Records Book

English wooden ship model - Cutty Sark replica

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

The English Cutty Sark replica model is a wooden replica scaled at 1:25. The wood is mahogany and it is normally displayed in a glass covered enclosure. It has three masts and it is the largest vessel of Denis Paraskevatos collection

Historical information

This replica ship was modelled to exact scale by Denis Paraskevatos with the original basic kit enhanced by a large number of brass and mahogany wooden parts used and showing on two labels positioned at the base of the model. These replica parts were specifically designed and constructed by D. Paraskevatos with the help of his family. This model along a large number of others have been displayed at the Victorian Parliament for ten days from the 18th March 2002 (Queens Hall) to the 28th March 2002, and the Melbourne Town Hall from 19th to 27th August 2004. The history of the 65 meter British vessel named Cutty Sark is as follows: THE CUTTY SARK (history) The “Cutty Sark” was a British clipper ship, aptly named of course as a [clipper for its speed ], which was built in 1869 on the [river Clyde in Scotland ] by the Jock Willis Shipping Corporation. It was primarily used to transport tea from China to Great Britain, as well to a lesser extent later in its life, wool from Australia; however, with the advent of the steam engines and the creation also of the Suez Canal in 1869, its days of operation as a sailing vessel were numbered, as the steam ships were now prevailing as technologically advanced cargo carriers through the shorter route by the Suez Canal to China. In fact, within a few years of its operation, as its delegation in the tea industry was declining, it was assigned primarily the duty of transporting wool from Australia to England, but this activity was thwarted again by the steam ships, as they were enabled by their technologies to travel faster to Australia. Eventually, the “Cutty Sark” in 1895 was sold to a Portuguese company called “Ferreira and Co.”, where it continued to operate as a cargo ship until 1922, when it was purchased on that year by the retired sea captain Wilfred Dowman, who used it as a training ship in the town of Falmouth in Cornwall. After his death, the ship was conferred as a gesture of good will to the “Thames Nautical Training College” in Greenhithe in 1938, where it became an auxiliary cadet training ship, outliving its usefulness as a training vessel by 1954, and permanently [being dry docked in Greenwich, London, ] for public viewing. Of course, the “Cutty Sark” was not the only tea clipper constructed and owned by the Jock Willis Corporation, as there were others who were also used for the transportation of tea from China to Great Britain. Noteworthy additionally in its impressive resume is the fact that, the “Cutty Sark” was not only valued and admired for its speed, but also for its prestige that it afforded to its owners, [as media coverage was insatiable during a tea race that was regarded a national sporting event, with fiscal bets being placed on a predicted winning ship ]. Disappointingly, even though the English tea clippers were the best in the world at the time in terms of marine design, they had never won a tea race, and Jock Willis was certainly determined to achieve this goal, as the American clippers were considered the fastest in the tea trade. Nonetheless, the British clippers were proven to be formidable opponents to their American counterparts in the tea trade, when in 1868 a British tea clipper called [“Thermopylae”, managed to travel from the port of London to Melbourne, in only sixty one (61) days, which Jock Willis was hoping to improve on such a feat with the “Cutty Sark” ] . Remarkably, the maximum speed that the “Cutty Sark” could achieve was 17.5 knots in spite of the challenges of the unpredictable winds, if any at times, and the high seas or ferocious storms. Interestingly, [the “Cutty Sark’s” greatest recorded achievement in distance in twenty four (24) hours was three hundred and sixty three (363) nautical miles ], which meant that it was averaging approximately fifteen (15) knots; much faster obviously than the recorded twenty four (24) hour distance of the “Thermopylae” which had accomplished three hundred and fifty (358) nautical miles. .... ______________ -*- Please read the complete history of the Cutty Sark vessel by Maria Paraskevatos in one of the attachments provided with this exhibit.

Significance

This model along with a large number of others was constructed by the Master craftsman Denis Paraskevatos, in Melbourne and has a historic, artistic significance because of the time and artist efforts in construction.

Inscriptions & Markings

CUTTY SARK LONDON

Lady's dancing costume - Βλαχοπούλα, vlahopoula costume

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Black and navy blue velvet and silver embroidery panels, button up at the front costume. Part "A" of a four piece costume. Three in possession of Thessaloniki Association

Historical information

Full costume traditionally worn by ladies in country towns of Greece. Recently worn in parades, Greek dances and theatrical performances

Significance

Historical significance for the purposes it was used by Thessaloniki Association in Australia

Inscriptions & Markings

ΠΑΙΔΙΚΗ ΧΑΡΑ

Boy's Tsolia Costume ribbed stocking,

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

White linen stocking part of six piece traditional tsolia boy's costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by soldiers in the 16th to 19th century AD. Recently used in parades and plays as a traditional costume.

Significance

Historical significance since it was used by Thessaloniki Association in parades and plays

Lady's dancing costume Jacket - Γιλέκο στολής βλαχοπούλας

Plutarch Project, Caulfield Junction

Lady's dancing costume Jacket, gold and silver embroidery around edges. It has orange lining of silk material, lace and linen frill sleeve. Whole costume is called "Vlahopoula". Velvet outer. Part "C" of a four piece costume.

Historical information

The full costume used traditionally by ladies in the 16th to 19th century AD. Now used in Greek dances, parades and theatrical performances as a traditional costume.

Significance

Historical significance due to the variety of traditional functions it was used during the 1990's