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Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation Gabo Island , Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority, created by the Parks Victoria Act 1998 and reporting to the Minister.
Our estate covers more than 4 million hectares, or about 18 per cent, of Victoria. We manage the largest and most diverse collection of heritage places on public land in Victoria, with around 2,900 heritage assets and many places of National and State significance.
Our primary responsibility is to ensure parks are healthy and resilient for current and future generations. We manage parks in the context of their surrounding landscape and in partnership with Traditional Owners.

Gabo Island is rich in cultural history, contains significant flora and fauna and has stunning landscapes with magnificent views of Croajingolong National Park, including the Cape Howe Wilderness Zone. It covers an area of approximately 154 hectares and features the only operating island lighthouse in Victoria. The lighthouse was constructed from 1858 to 1862 using the distinctive pink granite found on the island. Tours of the magnificent 47m high structure are available, with spectacular views from the top of the lighthouse.

Contact Information

location
Level 10/535 Bourke St Melbourne Victoria 3000
phone
+61 131963

Contact

Opening Hours

Tours of the lighthouse are available by arrangement with the caretaker. If staying at the lightstation these tours are included in your accommodation price.

Entry Fee

N/A

Location

Gabo Island Lightstation Gabo Island Lighthouse Reserve Gabo Island Victoria

The Gabo Island Collection comprises around 175 inventoried items located within the lightstation precinct. Most are spread over the lightkeeper’s quarters, the assistant lightkeepers’ quarters, the lighthouse and the shed formerly used for blacksmithing, and there are three shipwreck items displayed outdoors. About half the objects and parts of objects relate to lightstation’s core function of ensuring safe routes for shipping and establishing and maintaining communications, visually and electronically.

Significance

The first and second level items identified in this report contribute to the State level heritage significance of the lightstation for their historic values, including some for their relative rarity, representativeness, aesthetic or technological merit and potential to yield further information that will contribute to an understanding of Victoria’s cultural history.

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Bosuns chair and pulleys

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Chair (wooden piece of wood with cable threaded through 4 holes) with cables joining together above seat. Two metal pulleys with wire cable attached.

Historical information

Bosuns chair and harness with pulley. This device suspended a person from a rope and seat to perform work duties in safety. It includes a chair made from a flat piece of wood threaded through with a cable attached to pulleys, which move people or goods up or down heights such as the lighthouse, where it was used for painting the lighthouse and other tasks.

Significance

It has first level contributory significance for its relative completeness, historic value and provenance to the lightstation.

Insulator

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Four armed cross shaped insulator with two holes through diagonally opposite sections. It is ceramic with a clear glaze.

Historical information

Modern communication technologyarrived on gabo Island with the construction of the telegraph line from Eden to Gabo Island in 1870. The insulator is associated with the telegraph station. Used at the H.F Radio Beacon. The items of telegraphic equipment comprise a number of ceramic and glass insulators of varying age and type. In addition to insulators, there is a telephone insulator bracket made of metal with wooden pins. It was once attached to the top of a steel pole and some of these remain in situ along the former telegraph line (0044). Telegraphic communication commenced at the Gabo Lightstation in 1870, just eight years after the lightstation opened. The line from Sydney reached Eden, NSW by 1868 and was then extended to Gabo with the costs shared equally by NSW and Victoria. It was initially carried on posts across the sea to the island but was changed to a line along the seabed after the posts were washed away. The first telegraph office was a timber building on east side of the assistants’ quarters. In 1887 a new concrete telegraph office was built which included quarters for the operator, with Victoria and NSW sharing the construction costs. The 1992 CMP identified remnants of the line from its various phases of operation,and these were seen in 2016. Other ceramic insulators in the collection are associated with lines supported on utility poles for the transmission of high voltage electricity.

Significance

The various insulators have second level significance for their historic value and provenance

Lens section

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Section of a lens from a lighting apparatus , rectangular louvers of glass enclosed in a metal frame.

Historical information

Detached sector panel from upper lantern. The lens segment is one of a pair of freestanding panels that formerly stood on a platform in the upper lantern room on either side of a small fixed light. The platform rested above the 1860/62 Chance Bros. first order, fixed lens and could be accessed by a ladder. The two sector lens panels were each set in a bronze frame and comprised a curved wider (belt) piece in the centre with nine curved, slim line pieces above and below it (19 pieces in total). The belt aligned with the light source to provide optimal focus and range. The panels, the light and the platform were installed in 1934 to upgrade the original optical system with red warning lights. Fitting them above the lantern was a convenient and inexpensive way to do this, with each lens panel set up behind a red glass panel to project a red sector to the seaward over to Cape Howe and the Western Shore. The two sectors are likely to be Chance Bros. by manufacture although they do not appear to bear the maker’s name. This is probably because Chance Bros. typically fixed metal plaques to their apparatus and tended not to stamp smaller components such as their lens frames. It could possibly indicate that the two sectors are former components of a larger system, i.e. another lens. This can easily be confirmed by closely inspecting the bronze frames. A series of holes on the frame would indicate that ‘they would have bolted to other panels to make a larger lens assembly’. The absence of holes would confirm that ‘they were made specifically to stand alone’. The sector panels were removed from the Gabo lantern in February 1992. At some point after their removal, they were found in boxes marked with ‘Ince Pt.’, however it is thought that Ince Point lighthouse ‘never had … stand alone sectors’. The panel in the Gabo Island collection is one of two segments discovered at the Eden Killer Whale Museum in about 2007. One section was repatriated to Gabo Island and the other was to go to Smoky Cape Lighthouse in northern NSW. The Gabo lens segment has first level contributory significance for its historic value and provenance to the lantern room. It is recommended that Parks Victoria/AMSA seek to return the Smoky Cape segment to Gabo Island and reunite the sector panels.

Significance

The Gabo lens segment has first level contributory significance for its historic value and provenance to the lantern room.

Tanks, kerosene vaporiser

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Two large green cylinders standing in a metal frame. There is also a pumping mechanism attached to the stand with a wooden handle.

Historical information

The heavy twin tanks formerly contained vaporised kerosene which was used as a fuel to light the lantern. Kerosene became available in the 1860s as the oil industry in the United States developed, and vaporised kerosene soon became the most common system of illumination. The kerosene vapour lamp was perfected by Chance Bros. for burning the light in their renowned lenses. The system involved vaporising kerosene under pressure and mixing it with air and then burning the vapour to heat an incandescent mantle. The lamp had to be watched throughout the night in case a mantle broke, and the tanks needed to be maintained by hand-pumping each hour or so. Kerosene tanks like these were developed in the early twentieth century, and kerosene as a fuel was phased out by electricity, with the last kerosene system in Australia eventually replaced in 1985. The wick lamp in Gabo Island’s light was altered to a vaporised incandescent kerosene mantle burner in 1909. They would have been in use until 1935, when the light was electrified and the original first-order lens was replaced by a fourth-order lens. The Gabo Island tanks, which are presumed to be those used in the lighthouse between 1909 and 1935, are not attached to the optical apparatus and are no longer in the lighthouse. They are also missing the pressure gauges that were formerly attached to the top of each cylinder. Cape Schanck has a pair of unattached tanks, which are not historically associated with the lighthouse. Point Hicks has an iron stand that formerly supported its lighthouse oil tanks.

Significance

Despite their lack of intactness, the Gabo Island tanks have first level contributory significance for their provenance to the lightstation and historic association with the lantern’s original Chance Brothers first order lens, which was removed in 1935

Whale bones

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

1. Whale vertebrae, bleached white. 2. Whale bone, (rib) bleached white.

Historical information

Whale bones found in harbour area. Dr Imlay operated a whaling outpost in Santa Barbara Bay in the early 1800's. John Morris ventured into whaling in 1848. The success of these ventures is not known. Retrieved from the Gabo Island Harbour in 1999, the collection’s two venerable whalebones are reminders of the whaling industry that was associated with Gabo Island prior to construction of the lightstation. Evocative relics of this long ceased activity, they are now also symbolic of today’s concern for protecting and saving whales. The whalebones are the only known artefacts in the collection that illustrate the period when European sealers and whalers intermittently used the island for their activities. The Imlay brothers, who operated from Twofold Bay, Eden NSW, used the island as a base and lookout up until about 1846, and several huts were erected.Whaling was last associated with the island in 1848, when John Morris surreptitiously ventured into this activity while being paid to erect lightstation buildings for the NSW government. Gabo’s historic jetty store, which stands as the oldest structure on the island, was thought to be built by Morris and is possibly associated with the activities that led to his dismissal. The whalebones were recovered from the harbour, close to the location of the store and the site of the former whaling outpost.

Significance

The bones have first level contributory significance as evidence of the island’s whaling activities, which pre-date the history of the lightstation.

Hatch cover

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Timber & steel hatch cover from ship.(wrekage) Rectangular shaped piece of wood with a circular shape cut from centre. Corroded metal fragments have adhered to the wood.

Historical information

Wreckage from unknown ship. Found on "big beach" at Telegraph Point. 2002. Made of wood with corroded metal fragments, the hatch is undated wreckage from an unknown ship.

Significance

The remnants of shipwreck fabric have second level contributory significance for their interpretive and historic value as artefacts that highlight the distinctive history of the Gabo Island Lightstation.

Anchor

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Large rusted metal anchor.

Historical information

The iron anchor is from the iron steamship, Easby built in England in 1873. It struck Skerries Reef at Gabo Island and sank in the harbour in April 1907 while carrying a cargo of potatoes. The iron anchor was recovered from the wreck at an unknown date and put on display between the two sets of keepers’ quarters. Parts of the ship, including the collapsed hull plating, engine and boilers as well as another anchor lie at a shallow depth at the wreck site 15m west of the jetty. This wreck became a shipping hazard and was eventually blown up. (1928) Another anchor of identical design lies underwater on the shoreline 15 metres west of the jetty.The wreck site and relics, including the anchor on display, are protected by the Victorian Heritage Register (VHDS S204).

Anemometer

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Anemometer and tripod stand. Three cupped brass discs on rotating arms fixed to turned brass cylinder shaped shaft. Beneath discs is a lead directional wind arrow attached to a rotating arm. A wooden three legged stand with central supporting pole of black painted hardwood and attached to a white painted marine ply circular base.

Historical information

This device was used to measure surface wind speed and direction. This anemometer was located on a concrete pad outside room 2.15 on a steel pole. The pole was considered unsafe and the anemometer was relocated to it's current position. When lowering the pole it fell over and was badly damaged. The Bureau of Meteorology donated it to the museum. It was then repaired and restored. The central pole on which it is mounted is galvanised iron pipe painted black. The anemometer, a portable device that manually measures wind speed, was a necessary instrument once common to all weather stations. The arms are attached to a vertical rod and as the wind blows, the cups rotate, making the rod spin. The stronger the wind blows, the faster the rod spins. The anemometer counts the number of rotations, or turns, which is used to calculate wind speed, surface wind and direction. They were designed to be durable to withstand the corrosive environment and strong winds expected at coastal sites such as those at Gabo Island. Anemometers existed in the nineteenth century and their design was improved by various experts including John Robinson in 1846, John Patterson in 1926, Brevoort and Joiner in 1935 and Derek Watson in 1991 who added wind direction measurement to its functions. This example was made for the Bureau of Meteorology by the Melbourne instrument company, Synchrotac, which became registered and incorporated on 26 July 1966. It is now displayed inside the building.

Significance

A good example of its kind, the anemometer has first level contributory significance for its historic value and provenance to the lightstation.

Inscriptions & Markings

Under wind cups: " SYNCHROTAC / MELB. / ser.no.70/372 / MADE IN AUSTRALIA." Above wind direction arrow: "C.OF.APT..../ SYNCHROTAC / MELB ? MADE IN AUSTRALIA / ser.no.70/372"

Log book

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Lined log book with hard cover. Hand-written dated inscriptions in ink inside the book. Entries are from 1 September 1948 - 6 Novemebr 1951.

Historical information

This is a lightstation log book used on Gabo Island from the 1 September 1948 - 6 Novemebr 1951 to note all happenings at the lightstation, such as supplies arriving, boat arrivals, duties carried out etc.

Significance

Has at least secondary contributory value to the significance of the lightstation.

Insulator

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Typewriter

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

1. Black and white plastic and metal typewriter. 2. Grey vinyl typewriter cover.

Historical information

The black and white manual typewriter is made of plastic and metal by the Swiss company,Hermes. The model name ‘Ambassador’ and the series number M82, indicate that the typewriter was made sometime between 1953 and 1965. It demonstrates the working operations of the lightstation under the Commonwealth Lighthouse Service when it was managed by the Department of Transport, which introduced a number of modernising initiatives during this period.

Significance

It has second level contributory significance for its historic value as an original item of office equipment. It demonstrates the working operations of the lightstation under the Commonwealth Lighthouse Service when it was managed by the Department of Transport, which introduced a number of modernising initiatives during this period.

Inscriptions & Markings

2. On cover,"HERMES / Ambassador / FABRICATION SUISSE / MADE IN SWITZERLAND / D" : 1. On typewriter," M82". On label, " C.of A / D.O.T. 143851".

Brackets

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Two similar stainless steel brackets; half tubes with diagonally protruding flat section with hole at end. End is rounded.

Historical information

Stainless steel brackets off the wreck of the Gypsy Moth V, wrecked near the lighthouse on 19 December 1982. These brackets were used to hold wire stays to the mast or bowsprit. The comparatively recent relics have a reliable provenance to the yacht Gipsy Moth V, which ran ashore on rocks under the lighthouse on 18 December 1982. It was the yacht that carried Sir Francis Chichester (1901-1972) on his second world voyage in 1971. While sailing the 19m (63.5ft) vessel in the 1972 Transatlantic Race, Chichester became weakened by cancer and had to abandon the competition and died two months later. His son Giles sailed the yacht back to England. In December 1982 British skipper, Desmond Hampton chartered the yacht for the around the world, single handed race. He had been running second and was nearing the end of the second leg of the competition from Cape Town, South Africa to Sydney when the accident happened. After going to bed he set the yacht on self steering and it wedged itself into a crevice just below the lighthouse and broke up. Everything was salvaged except for the masts and the engine. Twenty five years later, in 2007, items salvaged from the wreck surfaced in regional Victoria in a display of the ‘Gipsy Moth V Collection’, which included wreckage as well as photographs. The information from the ‘Sail World’ website did not provide any further details about the exhibition or its organisers.

Bottle

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Dark brown glass bottle, tall with gradual tapering to a narrow opening. Slightly misshapen. White coating on one side.

Historical information

This dark brown bottle with lip, collar, neck and gently sloping shoulder, was made by the Bottle Co. of Victoria P/L for Melbourne Bitter. The Parks Victoria inventory indicates that the bottle dates to 1925. Still brewed today, Melbourne Bitter has been made since 1904, when the Melbourne Cooperative Brewery in Abbotsford was formed by well known pub owners that included Henry Young of Young & Jacksons, and future Lord Mayor Sir Stephen Morrell. They made four beers – Abbotsford Stout (which became Abbotsford Invalid Stout in 1909), Abbots Lager, Melbourne Bitter and Abbotsford Sparkling Ale. Of those, Melbourne Bitter and the Invalid Stout remain largely unchanged and both are now brewed by the South African owned CUB. The bottle was found in the sea or on the island.

Significance

Whatever their provenance, they have an association with an event or activity on Gabo Island and for this reason have second level contributory significance for their potential to yield information relating to the cultural history of the lightstation.

Inscriptions & Markings

Within a club motif, "M.B.C.V" "The property of the manufacturers. / Bottle co of Victoria Pty Ltd" "6 1925"

Flag canisters

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Forty-one galvanised canisters with separate lids. The canisters are painted a grey/white colour and have either numbers, letters or words painted on the lid and on the cannister in black paint. There are variations in the style of canister and in the style of the inscriptions.

Historical information

The 41 alphabetic and numeric visual signalling flags (including substitute and answering pennants) have either square or pointed ends. They are made of bunting, a coarse fabric of worsted (open yarn wool) in various colour combinations. Some of the flags are marked with inscriptions, for example “B”. Attachments to the flags include hemp rope and metal clips. Each flag has its own galvanised canister and lid, each of which is painted grey and marked with a letter, number or word. The flags were used for communicating messages to passing ships. Knowledge of visual signalling was mandatory for all lightkeepers and all lightstations maintained a set of flags. Although used for centuries, visual flag signalling formally developed in the nineteenth century and was published internationally as a system in 1857. By the early twentieth century it had developed into an effective means of conveying all kinds of short range visual messages. The signal flags and canisters at Gabo Island form a complete set and are not historically linked to the lightstation and their provenance is unknown. It is known however that they originate from a lightstation in Victoria and for some years were on loan from AMSA to the Queenscliff Maritime Museum, where they were held in storage and not displayed. In three of the six lightstations that Parks Victoria manages have sets of signal flags in their collections.

Finials

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

4 x Cylindrical shaped finials. Threaded inside. Cast iron. tapers to a point. 1. & 2. have residue paint.

Historical information

Ornamental drop finials x 4 from the lighthouse staircase.The four cast iron drop finials are decorative architectural features that were appended to the underside of the original lighthouse staircase, which was built between 1861 and 1862.The Conservation Management Plan prepared by Australian Construction Services in 1992 states that the original stair ‘was probably the first cast iron spiral stair to be built in an Australian lighthouse.’ From about 1978 to 1988 the tower’s original staircase was gradually removed and replaced by an iron replica and by 1992 the dismantled staircase had been shifted to the old jetty storage building and was ‘awaiting disposal’. Fortunately, it was not trashed but accessioned into the Eden Killer Whale Museum where it has since been incorporated into a recreated lighthouse.The staircase was removed from the tower prior to the lightstation’s inclusion in the Victorian Heritage Register in November 1999 (H1773). which may be the earliest cast iron spiral stair built in an Australian lighthouse.

Significance

The four baluster drop finials are of first level contributory significance to the Gabo Island Lightstation for their historic value and clear provenance to the tower’s original staircase erected in 1862, which may be the earliest cast iron spiral stair built in an Australian lighthouse.

Bedside tables

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Two Scandinavian style bed-side tables. Two drawers in each. Chipboard veneer top. Solid wood frame / legs. Stained an orange colour.

Historical information

Used at Lightstation. There are an identical pair in the studio cottage at Cape Otway Lightstation so they are most likely purchased for the Lightstation. The two drawer table has the name ‘Kalmar Melbourne’ on the rear confirming its provenance.The three tables, along with the nest of tables, chest of drawers , and two bookcases would have been purchased as part of a large order placed by the Commonwealth Government sometime between 1957 and the early 1970s, when Kalmar was concentrating on large commissions. Cape Otway Lightstation has a pair of the same bedside tables.

Significance

Gabo Island’s two bedside tables have first level contributory significance as part of a set, and for their clear provenance to Steven Kalmar whose functional designs introduced modern, low cost furnishings to a number of Australia’s lightstations.

Cabinet

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Two door wooden (cedar) cabinet. One internal shelf, panelled, curved back. Doors are attached. Frame has been stripped, doors are unpainted.

Historical information

Cupboard is original to Lighthouse. This nineteenth century cedar furnishing has two doors and one internal shelf. It remains in the lighthouse although its original location was probably the lantern room, where similar surviving cabinets are more typically found. It was purpose built for the lighthouse with a curved back to fit the proportions of the tower interior with the wood reputed to have originated from a partition in the assistant lightkeepers’ houses, and the cupboard doors possibly crafted at a different time. Curved cabinets similar to this example can be found at three other early lighthouses investigated by this study. It is possible that these specially designed cabinets were included in the standard complement of furnishings provided to the colony’s lightstations by the Victorian Public Works Department. Other similar cabinets with curved backs remain in the Point Hicks Lighthouse and at Cape Nelson (two examples )and Cape Schanck, which has a curved front as well as back .

Significance

The Gabo Island cabinet has first level contributory significance for its historic value, uniqueness, provenance to the lightstation and clear association with the functions of the lighthouse lantern room.

Hull wreckage

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Curved piece of wood with several copper nails protruding from base. Blackened (as if burnt but may be tar). Ends taper. Floor beam from boat.

Historical information

Part of ships’ hull, floor beam, found on the beach or in the sea.

Table

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Australian cedar table with turned legs and front drawer with brass keyhole and wooden knob. Unpainted.

Historical information

This table was found in the shed and restored in the 1990's by lightstation staff. The late nineteenth century cedar table has turned legs, a front drawer with brass knob pull (this may not be original). The wood has lost its original finish. Despite this, it has first level contributory significance for its historic value as an original furnishing that has remained at the lightstation since the nineteenth century.

Significance

It has first level contributory significance for its historic value as an original furnishing that has remained at the lightstation since the nineteenth century.

Tables

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Nest of three Scandinavian style tables, solid wood. Curved U shaped legs, one bar at base of table.

Historical information

Commonwealth government issue. This nest of tables are currently in use by the lighthouse staff.The set of three tables of descending size are designed in the same distinctive style as the bookcases and share the same wood type and finish (GILS 0012.2). Information on the underside of the tables indicates they were purchased by the Commonwealth through the Department of Transport for the CLS. The design bears the stylistic marks of the easily recognisable furnishings produced by the Kalmar firm, Sydney. Steven Kalmar (1909-1989), who migrated to Australia in 1939 and opened his own interiors business in 1949, played a significant role in popularising modernist design concepts in Australia drawing his ideas from Scandinavian and American trends. Born in Hungary, he trained as an architect and his contemporary affordable furnishings were especially suitable for the open-plan houses built in Australia’s new post-war suburbs. He closed the retail side of this in 1957 and concentrated on commissions, some for large-scale orders. One of these bulk orders came from the Commonwealth Government sometime between 1957 and the early 1970s, with several examples of light, compact and functional domestic furnishings supplied to lightstations in Victoria. Because the order was placed by the CLS, it is possible that Kalmar furnishings were also provided to lightstations in other states. Additional examples at Gabo Island include three bedside tables (GILS 0042.2 & 0076.10), chest of drawers (GILS 0077) and two bookcases (GILS 0012.2), with the backs of at least two of the furnishings bearing the Kalmar label. Kalmar furnishings in the other Victorian lightstations investigated by this study include bookcases at Cape Otway, Cape Nelson (3 examples) and Point Hicks (2 examples); two bedside tables at Cape Otway, and a long coffee table at Wilsons Promontory.

Significance

The set of tables has first level contributory significance for their clear provenance, completeness and association with Steven Kalmar whose functional designs introduced modern, low cost furnishings to a number of Australia’s lightstations.

Inscriptions & Markings

Underside of GILS007.3:"C of A / D.O.T 1444248" (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Transport.) •All tables have "16" on underside.

Telephone

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Telephone, wall-mounted in a wooden surround. Black crank handle on right-hand side. Separate black hand piece on left-hand side attached to main body by a fabric covered cord. The mouthpiece is fixed to the front of the telephone. There is a wooden rest attached to the lower front of phone on an angle. There are two half circular bells attached to the phone above the mouthpiece.

Historical information

It has been restored by lightstation staff in 2002. The phone has a fixed mouth piece and is attached to the lantern room wall on a timber box mount. Dating from the early twentieth century, it is the earliest of four telephones at the lightstation and the sole box-mounted model, and is also the only telephone in the lighthouse. It has a crank handle, a separate black hand piece and an inclined horizontal shelf for jotting down notes. The four telephones provided an intercom system that facilitated communication between the lightstation buildings. Four other wall-mounted phones remain at the Cape Nelson Lightstation but unlike the Gabo Island example they do not provide a rest for jotting down notes. As a fixture, the telephone is part of the building fabric and is included in the existing Victorian Heritage Register extent of registration for the Gabo Island Lightstation (H1773).

Significance

As a fixture, the telephone is part of the building fabric and is included in the existing Victorian Heritage Register extent of registration for the Gabo Island Lightstation (H1773). It is significant for its historic value and provenance, and relative uniqueness in a Victorian lighthouse.

Lifebouy

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Circular orange plastic ring with printed in black around ring. Ring has raised inscription. Remnants of white reflective tape in four places. White rope tied to ring through four holes in a distinctive taught crossed pattern at the back of the bouy.

Historical information

Possibly used as a tool to rescue people who may have been in distress in the ocean off Gabo Island. It was removed from Cape Otway and returned to Gabo Island museum. Information printed in black on the orange, plastic, ring shaped buoy confirms the item’s association with Gabo Island Lightstation and also indicates that it was made in Australia by the Rotadyne company for the Department of Transport, which oversaw lightstations between 1950 and 1982, and 1983 and 1987. The buoy was repatriated to Gabo Island from Cape Otway Lightstation in July 2015. It is unknown how it came to be there or how long it had been there.

Significance

It has second level contributory significance for its historic value and provenance.

Inscriptions & Markings

On front printed in black, "GABO ISLAND LIGHTSTATION", and embossed "MADE IN AUSTRALIA', 'DEPT. OF TRANSPORT / APPROVAL CERT. No 2315' On reverse, 'ROTADYNE'

Resuscitator kit & case

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Resuscitator box, green vinyl, hinged handle at top. Two metal fasteners on front, metal plated corners on lid. White thread stitching around edges. Case contains a resuscitator kit.

Historical information

For medical emergencies at Gabo Island. Unsure if ever used. The portable, manual resuscitator kit is contained in its original green vinyl, hinged case that has corner protectors and two metal front fasteners. Information on the case indicates that it is an ‘Air CIG Viva Resuscitator’. It was used for manual force feeding oxygen into a person’s lungs with the use of a breathing bag, and there are instructions for using the resuscitating bag. The kit was produced by the Commonwealth Industrial Gases Limited, Alexandria, NSW, a company active between 1935 and 1994. An identical kit, which has been accurately dated to 1951, remains at the Cape Otway Lightstation . Another identical kit is held by the Ambulance Historical Society Victoria.

Significance

Both kits have first level contributory significance for their historic values and provenance.

Inscriptions & Markings

On case "Air CIG Viva Resuscitator. "On sticker "C. of A. D.O.T. 141545"

Bottle

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Thick dark green glass bottle. Scratches over surface of bottle. It has a lip (for a cork), slightly bulbous neck, rounded shoulders and a tall tapered body.

Historical information

Found on Gabo island or in the sea or on the beach. This is identified as a typical nineteenth century rum bottle.

Significance

Whatever their provenance, they have an association with an event or activity on Gabo Island and for this reason have second level contributory significance for their potential to yield information relating to the cultural history of the lightstation.

Telephone

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Black bakelite telephone, wall mounted with reciever/ handset on spiral cord attached to the body of the phone. There is a crank handle attached to the front of the telephone.

Historical information

Telephones x 3 (GILS 0001, 0038, 0070; attached fixtures) There are three, black Bakelite, wall mounted, crank handle telephones across the lightstation; one in the former assistant keeper’s quarters, and two in the former head keeper’s quarters. The phone has instructions for its use on the crank dial. Two have acoiled handset cord, which dates the phone to just after 1949 when these came into use. The third has a smooth cord and must pre date 1949 (GILS 0070). Another much older wallmounted phone remains in the lighthouse (GILS 0041; attached fixture; see above 6.1). The four telephones at Gabo Island formed an intercom system that facilitated communication between the lighthouse and lightstation buildings. They demonstrate the necessity for employing various methods of communication in a remotely located lighthouse as well as communication between the lightstation buildings. Telephones of the same wall mounted, crank dial type remain at Cape Otway and Point Hicks As fixtures, the telephones belong to the building fabric and are included in the existing listing of the Gabo Island Lightstation in the Victorian Heritage Register (H1773).

Significance

These intact items of equipment have first level contributory significance for their historic value and provenance.

Inscriptions & Markings

On dial under crank handle. Outer perimeter of circular LABEL,"TO CALL:-TURN HANDLE & LIFT HANDSET / WHEN FINISHED PEPLACE HANDSET & TURN HANDLE"

Bottle

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Brown glass bottle, square sides

Historical information

The clear brown glass bottle has straight sides and a short neck, with the lip indicating that it originally had stopper rather than a lid or cap. There is heavy embossing on the face with the words 'Dexsal / Reg. Trade Mark', and base with 'F 397'. Dexsal was sold by chemists as a stomach antacid and the registered trade mark of the company was lodged in 1935. The collection of the Kiewa Valley Historical Society includes an example of the same bottle, which it dates to the 1940s.

Inscriptions & Markings

On front of bottle, written sideways, "DEXSAL / REG.TRADE MARK" On base, "F397"

Bottle

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Brown bottle with four flat sides. It tapers up, beginning with a small square base widening out and tapering to a narrow neck with a thread for a screw top. The bottle has a screw rim top, collar, short neck, four shoulders and a tapered body leading to an edged base.

Historical information

Embossed information on the side shows it to be the property if H.M. Leggo (1869-1938), a Bendigo merchant and manufacturer of grocers’ sundries that included pickles, sauces and condiments. In the 1920s the company expanded into chemicals such as arsenic, rabbit poison and pest sprays. Leggo’s bottles for condiments and preserves tended to be made of clear glass. The square base and tapered body is similar to the J Kitchen & Son brown phenyl bottle, and the Leggo bottle may have also contained a household chemical substance. It was found in the sea or on the island.

Significance

Whatever their provenance, they have an association with an event or activity on Gabo Island and for this reason have second level contributory significance for their potential to yield information relating to the cultural history of the lightstation.

Inscriptions & Markings

On side, "THIS BOTTLE IS THE PROPERTY OF H.M.LEGGO & CO LTD." On the side,"Reg.No 9376"

Locker, flag

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Timber cabinet painted grey, partitioned with numerous open compartments of the same size .

Historical information

Probably used in the past to house the Signal Flag set at the lightstation. Appears to have been stored in the old stables for a number of years.The rectangular wooden cabinet has the distinctive features of a flag locker, comprising numerous open compartments of the same size each for storing a signal flag of a unique design. It has three internal shelves and a bench top, and is painted grey, a colour that is used for many of the wooden utilitarian furnishings in the six lightstations Parks Victoria manages. The cabinet, without its flag contents, was found in storage in the old stone stable building and is highly likely to be original to the lightstation. A wooden flag locker is held at Wilsons Promontory Lightstation. A wooden locker comprising two sections of 16 pigeon holes and four cupboard doors is held at Cape Otway The two flag lockers at Cape Nelson Lightstation are included in Victorian Heritage Register for contributing to the significance of the lightstation. The Nelson, Otway and Promontory lockers have associated sets of flags which are original to the lightstations.

Significance

The Gabo Island cabinet has second level contributory significance for its provenance to the lightstation.

Desk

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Wooden desk with metal frame. Dark grey vinyl top, three drawers on left-hand sde with metal handles. Second drawer has filing inserts.

Historical information

Government issue desk. Manufactured (perhaps 1970s)

Significance

It has second level contributory significance as a furnishing that has remained at the lightstation to demonstrate its more recent working operations.

Inscriptions & Markings

Right-hand front leg on black sticker. "C. of A. / D.O.T. 147110"

Propeller

Parks Victoria - Gabo Island Lightstation, Gabo Island

Four armed propeller from a boat/yacht. It appears to be made of brass and has a stainless steel threaded bolt through the center.

Historical information

The 4 armed steel propeller is from an unknown yacht of unknown date. The object is fixed to a block of pink granite with bolts and is displayed in front of the lightkeepers’ quarters.

Significance

The remnants of shipwreck fabric have second level contributory significance for their interpretive and historic value as artefacts that highlight the distinctive history of the Gabo Island Lightstation.