Historical information

This photograph is part of the Caulfield Historical Album 1972. This album was created in approximately 1972 as part of a project by the Caulfield Historical Society to assist in identifying buildings worthy of preservation. The album is related to a Survey the Caulfield Historical Society developed in collaboration with the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) and Caulfield City Council to identify historic buildings within the City of Caulfield that warranted the protection of a National Trust Classification. Principal photographer thought to be Trevor Hart, member of Caulfield Historical Society. Most photographs were taken between 1966-1972 with a small number of photographs being older and from unknown sources. All photographs are black and white except where stated, with 386 photographs over 198 pages. House is commonly spelt as "Payneswicke".

Significance

From: Glen Eira Heritage Management Plan (1996) by Andrew Ward and Associates "Payneswicke" is locally significant as a prominent and substantially intact villa of its period, distinguished by its cast cement enrichment, unpainted stuccoed surfaces and commanding aspect to the south-west. Its role for a period as home for local builder, Patrick Millane (compare no. 11 Gladstone Parade) is of interest. In 1889, a nine roomed brick house was in the course of erection on the site. The house was completed in 1890 and Millane took up residence. Millane continued as owner/ occupant in 1894. However, in 1899, although Millane still occupied the house, ownership had been taken over by the Land Mortgage Bank. By 1910, Andrew Brown was occupant. Occupancy passed to Edward Brown by 1920 and to Miss A.N. Brown by 1930. Miss Brown continued to live there in 1941.

Physical description

Page 50 of Photograph Album with three exterior photographs (2 landscape and 1 portrait) of Paynswicke, a double storey house.

Inscriptions & markings

Hand written: No 13 [top right] / "Paynswicke" N.E. cnr Gladstone Pd & Hartington St [top right] / 8 Oct 1966 [under top left photo] / 50 [bottom right]